2013 Syrena Sport

The auto industry is full of brands that have gone by the wayside, for one reason or another.

It’s not uncommon given the competitiveness of the industry and yet for some of the legendary brands of yesteryear, there’s always that hope that the brand will be reborn if there’s somebody willing to finance it.

Over in Poland, Syrena was once a brand that roamed its streets back in the 50s up to the early ’70’s. But while it did last for quite some time, the irony is the model that most people associate with Syrena was the one that never made it into production: the Syrena Sport.

But thanks to entrepreneur, Rafal Czubaj, the Syrena Sport may finally see the light of production. With the help of a team that includes designer Pavlo Burkatskyy - one of the people that helped pen the Arrinera supercar - Czubaj is determined to finally bring the Syrena Sport to life.

Click past the jump to read more about the Czubaj’s plans for the Syrena Sport

Exterior

Syrena Sport

Using the underpinnings of a Nissan 370Z , the up-to-the-times design of the Syrena Sport mixed with some aggressive curves and swooping lines justify its designation as the sports car that never was all while boasting a curb weight of just 2,865 pounds.

The presence of a hood scoop will do wonders in air circulation for the engine but those raised headlight housings appear to be a tad too high for our tastes.

But we can handle that, particularly because the overall design does justice to the mysterious legacy of the Syrena Sport.

Interior

Syrena Sport

No clear images of the interior have been released, but we’re venturing a guess that it will be a two-seat configuration with plenty of technological equipment that will give justice to the rather edgy and expressive exterior look of the sports car.

Likewise, we’d be surprised if there’s no presence of leather or Alcantara trim present inside the cabin. With a car that looks like this, it only deserves the finest materials inside.

Performance

Syrena Sport

The car will be powered by a 3.7-liter V-6 engine that will produce to different levels of output: 330 horsepower on a naturally-aspirated engine and a more powerful 450 horsepower when you throw a turbocharger into the mix. The latter output, in particular, can hit some pretty impressive performance numbers, including a 0-to-60 mph time of less than 4.5 seconds with a top speed of 180 mph.

Pricing

Syrena Sport

For now, the Syrena Sport will be build depending on how much demand it receives from customers. There’s only one example that’s already in the production oven, but we expect more should there be an interest in it.

Competition

Touring Superleggera Disco Volante.

Touring Superleggera Disco Volante

In the event that the Syrena Sport does hit production, albeit in a limited basis, the sheer exclusivity immediately makes it a pretty hard car to get. Even more so should the sports car become a popular sell.

But if you’re ready to hitch your wagon on the Syrena Sport, maybe you should stop and take a look at a car that not only looks pretty similar to the Syrena but also carries roughly the same amount of power: the Touring Superleggera Disco Volante.

Just like the Syrena Sport, the Disco Volante will be extremely limited — just 500 units — with cars being built on a per-order basis. As far as its overall shape, you can make a case that the Disco Volante is right in the wheelhouse of the Syrena Sport. There are some striking differences, like the front profile and the more classic and sleek look of the Disco Volante, but ultimately, you’re going to get an eye-catching sports car whichever one you choose.

As far as powertrain goes, the Disco Volante is powered by a 4.7-liter V-8 engine that produces about 450 horsepower and 347 pound-feet of torque with an estimated 0-to-60 mph time of 4.2 seconds and an estimated top speed of 181 mph.

Conclusion

Syrena Sport

We like the reason for giving birth to the Syrena Sport. Plus, you’ve got some very capable and highly astute minds working on the project. Our big problem, like with most limited, per-order sports cars, is the fact that it is limited.

Sure, there’s that feeling of exclusivity that everybody likes, but what happens when it needs maintenance and you have parts that are extremely hard to find?

It becomes too much of a hassle to own, especially if you have to seek some parts from Poland.

LOVE IT
  • Impressive design
  • Powertrain has heart
  • Bringing back the Syrena name
LEAVE IT
  • Extremely limited
  • Hard parts to get?
  • Plenty of other options

What is your take?

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