Audi Quattro

Audi Quattro

  Considered to be the most significant technological advancement of the Group B rallying era, the Audi Quattro, or Ur-Quattro as it is sometime referred to, introduced the world to what we know today as the best all wheel drive system on the market. Introduced in 1981, the top of the line two door fastback was eventually powered by a turbocharged 2.2 Liter DOHC inline 5 cylinder engine making 217 HP and capable of reaching a 143 MPH top speed. In competition trim, the five cylinder was tuned to make as much as 500 HP while the car's curb weight was dropped to around 2,400 pounds good for a 0 to 60 MPH time of only 3.1 seconds. The Quattro won two WRC manufacturer's championships in 1982 and 1984 with Walter Röhrl and Stig Blomqvist behind the wheel as well as a pair of driver's championships with Hannu Mikkola and the Stig in 1983 and 1984. Meanwhile the Audi Quattro also won the 1985 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb in record setting time with Michèle Mouton at the controls and then again in 1987 with Mr. Röhrl at the helm.

It wasn’t even a week ago that we were eyeing the Audi Quattro Concept at the Paris Motor Show with the full intent of drooling over one if the German brand ever decided to turn this concept into a production reality. Out of the many concept cars that appeared in Paris, the Quattro just seemed to carry an air about it that excited us. And, apparently, we weren’t the only ones that felt that way as Audi has already been in talks to make a production model for the sports car. If this does happen, the production version will be assembled in limited numbers on a dedicated line at the company’snewly acquired sister firm , ItalDesign, near Milan.

Stefan Reil, head of development at Audi’s Quattro Gmbh division said: "We are rethinking standard processes to make it possible. We know how to engineer it already. We need feedback to see if it is possible. Audi has no heritage in building 200-500 cars that are really exotic. But it won’t be over €100,000 (around $140,000 at the current exchange rates)."

The Quattro Concept unveiled at the Paris Auto Show is powered by a five-cylinder turbocharged engine that delivers an impressive 408 HP, but the production version will be somewhere in the 350 HP area.

Source: Autocar

We love our concept cars and the Paris Motor Show certainly didn’t disappoint in that regard. Automakers left and right all showed up and brought their concept rides with them, much to the delight of the entire attending auto scribes.

Of all the concepts that were present in Paris, one that really caught our attention was Audi ’s Quattro Concept . Sure, there were a lot more bombastic vehicles in attendance, but if there was one concept that really found its way into our subconscious longing of owning one, it’s the Quattro Concept.

Unfortunately, the car is classified as such – a concept – for a reason. We don’t know if and when the car will see the production line and how much one would set us back financially should the car make it to the dealerships. Then again, that’s a problem waiting to be solved at another time. For now, we can’t stop ogling over this car, and with these two new videos of the Quattro Concept that Audi just released, we wouldn’t be surprised if you start doing the same.

Unedited version after the jump

Source: Audi

Next to the standardQuattro concept , Audi has also displayed at the Paris Auto Show a rally version for it. However this model only was in display, with no official details on it. But if you take a look at the image, you will notice it comes painted in red, white and black as an homage to the early 1980s.

Besides this features it will be distinguished from the usual Quattro concept by a ventilated hood, a massive front lip spoiler, aerodynamic changes around the wheels, polycarbonate racing windows, a big rear wing and the German flag added on the sides. Like the standard concept it also gets center-locking 20-inch alloy wheels. It also gets numerous carbon fiber inserts and LED lights.

The Quattro Concept is powered by a five-cylinder turbocharged engine that delivers an impressive 408 HP and sprints the car from 0 to 60 mph in only 3.9 seconds.

Fancy yourself owning a piece of racing history? If your answer is yes, then we have something that should picque your curiosity.

An independent dealer in Las Vegas claims to have an Audi 200 turbo Quattro Trans-Am race car that he claims to be a completely legitimate car that competed at the American Trans-Am series. And that’s not his only claim; he also says it’s the very same Audi that Hurley Haywood drove on his way to winning eight of the 13 races during the 1988 American Trans-Am series.

The seller is also saying that this particular racer was purchased straight from Audi Sport in Ingolstadt, Germany and that it comes with some pretty intimidating firepower underneath its hood, specifically a turbocharged inline-five engine - it produces over 510 horsepower - that was also used by some of Audi’s world rally championship cars.

No word yet on how much this car will cost and anybody who’s interested will need to inquire to the seller to see how much moolah they’re going to need to fork over. But if everything checks out, this Audi 200 Turbo Quattro Trans-Am race car just may be too good of a deal to pass up.

It goes without saying that the Quattro system has become such an integral part of Audi ’s fleet of models, especially in the US where the whole system was partially responsible for turning the image of Audi from a Volkswagen -owned automaker to a brand that pretty much has stood as its own unique marquee.

But while the words ’Audi’ and ’Quattro’ have become synonymous with each other, the question on a lot of people’s minds, who aren’t familiar with the technology, is what the whole Quattro principle really is.

If you ask any one of us, we can give you a watered-down version of it, but that wouldn’t be any fun and it wouldn’t be as – how shall we put it – educational as hearing it straight from the horse’s mouth.

That being said, we invite you to watch this six-minute video of Audi explaining what the Quattro system is all about. Pay attention because it’s as close to a crash course as you can get.

Source: Audi

There’s nothing like a trip to memory lane that brings back nostalgic moments from the past.

For Walter Röhrl, a man many regard as the finest rally car driver in history, there may be such a thing as too many memory lanes to choose from. So Autocar did him a great service by picking one particular event his past: the 1984 Rally Monte Carlo.

If you were old enough to have seen it, you’ll probably remember Röhrl winning that race on-board an Audi Quattro . What Autocar then decided to do was bring Röhrl back to his scene of conquest 26 years later on with the same race car – the A2 Quattro – and in the same scenic leg of the Rally Monte Carlo – the Col de Turini.

Check out how Röhrl fared this time around and watch first-hand exactly why this man was bestowed the title of Rally Driver of the Century in Italy and
Rally Driver of the Millennium in France.

Source: Autocar UK

It’s hard to imagine Audi’s Quattro system being around for 30 years, but if you think about it, yeah, it’s been around that long.

First introduced at the 1980 Geneva Motor Show with the Audi Ur-Quattro, the Quattro system has gone on to become an integral part of Audi’s fleet of models, especially in the US where the whole system was partially responsible for turning the image of Audi from a Volkswagen-controlled carmaker to a brand that pretty much has stood as its own unique marquee.

In light of the Quattro system’s anniversary, Audi is scheduled to plan a year-long celebration with activities lined up, including an exhibition at the Audi Forum in Ingolstadt and an Audi Tradition where the brand shows off various Quattro models to shows all over Europe.

If you’re a fan of Audi’s Quattro system – from it’s roots back in 1980 with the Ur-Quattro all the way to the latest generation TT Coupe –then this celebration, along with the corresponding tour exhibits, is something we’re pretty sure you wouldn’t want to miss.

Source: Audi

We here at Top Speed have been eagerly awaiting the return of the original four-wheel drive performance machine. The Ur-Quattro was mix of parts from the Volkswagen parts bin that Audi’s Group B engineers used to develop what at the time, most said would be too heavy and bulky an idea to be worth it. Today, all vehicles that compete in the top tier of rally racing are all wheel drive.

As you know Audi is preparing to bring back the Ur-Quattro . A first concept will be unveiled in 2010, with the production version following soon after in 2012. The production model will be available with stylish rims sized either 19 or 20 inches housing ceramic brakes and a newly designed aero package with an active rear spoiler, larger air intakes for additional cooling, wider sills and a magnetic-ride suspension. Of course the new model will come with a set of quattro sport differentials.

The new model will combine a sharp appearance with advanced technology and offer it in an affordable package just in time to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Ur-Quattro’s original rally success . Under the hood Audi will use a variety of power plants. Ranging from a V8 to biturbo V6, there is even talk of a twin charged 2.0 Liter four cylinder engine making an impressive 300 HP and the proven 2.5 Liter five cylinder from the factory tuned Audi TT RS .

Source: Autobild
Posted on by Terence 4

Certain automotive enthusiasts have a particular lust for certain makes and models that can lead them to do crazy things. Some spend ridiculous amounts of money, some dedicate a little too much elbow grease and other do both. Their quest to obtain the vehicle of their dreams often ends with half built cars, clutter garages and broken marriages; but for some reason they strive on. Fortunately there are a few instances where all of the benefits can be had with none of the nasty drawbacks. One suck lucky car builder is Coen Donkers from Holland. Donkers was a fan of a particular Audi race car, but being that the real thing is over twenty years old and in limited supply, Coen decided to build himself an Audi Sport Quattro .

When Donkers picked up the car that would eventually become what you see before you, it was a wrecked shell of its current self, but luckily for Coen, he runs an Audi parts shop in Veghel, Holland. So he already had garage space for the project and a team of mechanics that could work on it in their down time. Coen decided to keep things simple, replacing the bent bodywork and work out pieces with all new OEM parts. Despite the Audi Sport Quattro replica’s wild appearance, the exterior is stock, it is just covered in graphics inspired by the rally car from the 1980s that make it look so radical.

Continued after the jump.

Source: Speedhunters

Everybody’s favorite Group B contender, the Audi Sport Quattro, could be making a comeback in four ringed showrooms as early as 2012. The Audi Quattro Audi Quattro , also known as the Ur-Quattro was a milestone of automotive engineering. When others said that 4 wheel drive was too heavy to be competitive Audi laughed. Mating their now infamous quattro all wheel drive system to a turbocharged 5 cylinder engine made them a force to be reckoned with from the European FIA rally stages to the American Pikes Peak Hill Climb, the Quattro dominated them all. So it is no wonder that the Volkswagen brand will bring back the championship winning name.

Audi Quattro coming back in 2012

The new Quattro will be based on the A5 chasis and include a 425 HP turbocharged V6, an R8 inspired front end and thanks to Audi’s aluminum construction the vehicle should weigh in at less than 3000 pounds. Priced at around €70,000 (almost $90,000) the new iteration of the classic Audi is sure to become a collector’s item.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the Group B car, or just want to see it in action again, check out the videos after the jump.

Source: Autobild

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