car crash

car crash

  Car Crashes, always fun to watch, and a good reality call for all of us who love speed. Keep the road safe.

There are three types of accidents in the world of car racing: expected, freak, and “how in the [insert favorite expletive] did that happen?” Well, an accident involving an AMG racecar, air line, and four Mercedes DTM crew members falls into the latter of those three categories.

This is a clear example of a pit crew simply not following the most basic of pit rules: clean your crap off of pit lane after you’re done and secure your air hose properly until you are ready to use it. After a fairly quick pit stop by the AMG coupe during practice at Zandvoort on Friday, the coupe speeds away. The crew directly in front of the car apparently left their air hose dangling over the track in anticipation of a pit stop of their own and the car’s rear spoiler caught the hose.

Well, the hose turns into a massive bull whip with a crack that would make Indiana Jones feel inadequate. As it whips around, it catches four crew members and drops three to the tarmac. Luckily, no one was seriously injured, as Mercedes has released a statement that three of the four were released from the hospital and are back on the job, but one remains in the hospital with serious, but not life threatening, injuries.

From the 1:10 mark to the 1:15 mark, you can see the accident in slow motion and you can really get a look at how lazily wrapped the air hose is. The hose that the Mercedes hit was hanging halfway down, whereas the rest of the hoses in pit lane are tightly wrapped and well above the top of the spoiler.

We’re sure this team is in for a quick and harsh lesson on pit-lane maintenance and organization. Then again, getting bull whipped by an air hose may be lesson enough.

Source: AutoSport

The dangers of auto racing aren’t limited to just race drivers; in some instances, especially when they get really too close, spectators open themselves up to the same risks as the drivers.

Unfortunately, that reality reared its ugly head last weekend in Serbia during the FIA European Hillclimb Championship when a Mitsubishi rally car lost control on one of the turns before hitting a crowd that was sitting a little too close to the action.

The high-speed crash had fatal results, with three spectators dying when the rally car barreled its way toward them. The video that was captured of the crash is only 17 seconds long, but it was long enough to paint a real picture of what happens when things go terribly, terribly wrong.

Organizers of that event immediately banned all spectators from staying in the area, but it was a case of being too little too late.

Watch the video and see how the crash came about. If for nothing else, it’s a far cry from the video we saw last week of a rally driver performing an unbelievable save with, coincidentally, another Mitsubishi rally car.

Source: You Tube

We love car chases in movies and we love them even more when they involve beating the hell out of expensive cars. Well, “The Last Stand” just so happens to feature just that. In its trailer, we have found that it shows a Camaro ZL1 and a Corvette ZR1 in a high-speed chase that eventually lands itself in a corn field.

While the scene is short in the trailer, it is certain to pack a load of action in full length. In general, the movie looks like it’ll be pretty bad-ass, if you are the type that loves shoot-em-up bad-guy flicks... And I am one that loves those flicks.

When you add in the fact that three of my favorite actors are in it — Schwarzenegger, Johnny Knoxville, and Peter Stormare (John Abruzzi from “Prison Break”) – I just may be willing to pony up the $55, or whatever theaters are charging these days to see a movie. The two awesome cars duking it out are just the icing on the cake.

So check out the above trailer and keep a keen eye out at the 1:07 mark to get a glimpse of Arnie behind the wheel of the ZL1 and ramming the ZR1 into the corn field. Tell us what you think of the trailer and the fact that the production crew likely destroyed about $170,000 worth of cars in that one scene. Let us know what you think or have heard about this movie in the comments.

Source: LSXTV
Fisker Karma

The second Fisker fire fiasco has officially come to a close and the investigation turned up pretty much what we all expected: the batteries were not at fault. As we stated in our initial report, the fire was near the front of the vehicle, so failed batteries would have been a rather unlikely cause.

After a full investigation by Fisker’s engineers and an “independent fire expert” from Pacific Rim Investigative Services, it was discovered that the fire source was a faulty low-temperature cooling fan. In a fit of customer service, Fisker has decided to recall all affected Karma units.

In a press release regarding the findings, Fisker makes sure that everyone knows it’s not responsible by passing the blame torch to the fan manufacturer, calling it the “responsible supplier.” While that is technically a true statement, there is really no need to openly pass that blame. In all reality, your company installed the fan and performed the obligatory testing on it.

Surprisingly, the most directly affected person – the owner of the Fisker flambe – had the following to say: “I have been incredibly impressed with the way Fisker has handled this incident. I have personally started seven technology companies and know from direct experience that the US needs more innovative companies of this type, especially in the automobile sector. Fisker is a great company and one that I am personally planning to invest in. I look forward to getting behind the wheel of my next Fisker.”

Good for the customer for being so forgiving, but we would be hard pressed to get behind the wheel of a Fisker until there is plenty testing done without any incidents of fire.

We’re glad to see this fiasco come to an end and we truly hope that this is the last of Fisker’s issues, as we want to see this alternative fuel technology succeed and this success depends on the success or failure of both Tesla and Fisker.

Click past the jump to read Fisker’s full presser.

The Ferrari Daytona is one of the most sought after cars in automotive history and certainly the most sought after Ferrari. There were only 1,406 models built in its six model years, making it a very exclusive car. The spyder model, which is officially dubbed the Ferrari 365 GTS/4 is ultimately the rarest of the group, seeing only 122 models from 1971 through 1973.

We are not certain how many of the 122 spyder models are still in existence today, but that number may be taken down by one after a horrible meeting between a GTS/4 and a German tree. As expected of such a meeting, the tree won, leaving the once-worth-$600,000 GTS/4 with some serious damage.

According to reports, the driver claimed that his brakes failed, causing him to slam into the tree. Fortunately, the driver was not injured and his passenger was only treated for minor injuries. More than likely, the GTS/4 will be rebuilt, but judging from the damage, it will no longer be a $600K car. Hopefully the driver had some pretty stout insurance coverage on this puppy...

Source: Jalopnik

Almost on a daily basis, we express our complete obsession with rally racing, as their drivers have to have ice in their veins to even consider whipping a car around these often treacherous tracks at triple-digit speeds. With this incredible speed and loose surfaces come some of the most incredible wrecks, but also some of the most incredible saves.

The above video comes to us from a Polish rally and from the date stamp on the video, it occurred on the August 11th. The driver of this Mitsubishi Evo came into a wet turn just a little too hot and went over the embankment at the end of the turn. Suddenly the car ends up on two wheels, but somehow it winds up back on the road and heads in a straight path.

Typically, when a racecar hits two wheels, an inexperienced driver simply plays damage control. He prepares for impact and hangs on. This driver is obviously rather seasoned, as he maintains control, doesn’t panic, and acts as if nothing happened once the car is back on all fours. This definitely qualifies as an entrant into the Save of the Year running for 2012.

Check out the video for yourself. There is one video above and two more after the jump. It’s rather impressive, but pretty loud, so you may want to adjust the volume on your speakers a little.

Click past the jump to see the two alternate views.

The old term “They sure don’t build ’em like they used to” should always be followed up with a “Good,” because modern cars perform better in crash tests than any of the land yachts of the 1970s. Yeah, these cars may be smaller and lighter than those of yesteryear, but advancements in crumple zones and energy transfer over the decades has made them into very protective shells that crumple into piles of tin for the sake of protecting their passengers.

Unfortunately, all of this technology is not without its flaws, which the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is now pointing out. The IIHS has developed a new test to mimic the cause of nearly a quarter of all front-end collision deaths, which is called the “small overlap” test. This is when only a small portion of the front bumper impacts another vehicle or an object.

You may be surprised to hear about who’s failing this important new test. Among those tested to receive the IIHS’ worst rating, “Poor,” was the Mercedes Benz C-Class , Lexus IS and ES , and the Audi A4 . Receiving a score of “Marginal,” which is just above poor, is the Acura TSX , BMW 3-Series , Lincoln MKZ , and Volkswagen CC .

Click past the jump for the rest of the results, as well as an obnoxious statement by one top automaker in regards to the testing process.

Yesterday, we brought you an exclusive interview with Paul Dallenbach following his death defying accident at the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb. Now, we have managed to get our hands on a few more bits of exclusive material, thanks to Paul and his PR rep.

The first bits of material we received were the actual images of the trees that Paul’s 1,400-horsepower racecar plowed over. As you can see in the images, he snapped those pines like they were No. 2 pencils. The second image shows us his mangled open-wheel racer laying covered in what appears to be fire-extinguishing foam.

The last bit of material took some time to get, but it was well worth the wait. Paul has graced us with the first look at his in-car footage from the accident. We never knew exactly how far into the race he was when the accident occurred, but it turns out that he was less than a minute from the starting line before careening into the woods, according to the footage, which you can see above.

The sheer violence of the impact really shows us just how lucky Mr. Dallenbach was to survive this ordeal. What an amazing piece of footage and what an amazing man to be willing to share all of this information with us.

A huge thank you to Paul, Mary, and the entire Dallenbach Racing team. Best wishes on a full recovery to Paul and we can’t wait to see him behind the wheel again.

Pikes Peak is the home of the dramatic wreck, thanks to its 156 twists and turns over a 12-mile-long mountain course. Thanks to Paul Dallenbach, we got a really cool first-hand account of one of the two most dramatic wrecks of this year’s run. Fortunately, he is doing well and seems ready to hop back in the driver’s seat.

By far the most dramatic wreck, but only because we get to see the entire thing unfold, is the one that Jeremy Foley and his co-driver endured. As his Lancer Evolution was heading toward an area very appropriately named “Devil’s Playground,” Jeremy lost control of his Evo and went straight over the hill, rolling about 10 times – by our count – before finally coming to a smoking rest. The two had Dallenbach-like luck, as neither broke any bones, according to reports, but the co-driver is suffering from a sore shoulder. Check out the dramatic video above.

Click past the jump to see additional footage of other wrecks from the 2012 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb.

Pikes Peak is by far one of the most treacherous courses in the U.S., as it climbs a total of 4,720 feet over a span of 12.42 miles and it boasts 156 turns. Even on its own site it says “Competitors and vehicles must be in top shape simply to finish...let alone win!” The video above shows exactly what can happen when even the slightest error in a car can cause a deadly crash scene.

Fortunately for the racing world, Paul Dallenbach, the driver of the 1,400-horsepower monster you see taking high-speed plunge into the trees, cheated death this time around. We were interested in how he was feeling, so we gave our Paul a call and checked on his recovery process. He felt so good, he was able to give us a short interview about the crash, so our readers can get a good idea of what actually went on.

UPDATE 08/14/2012: Check out our images of the Dallenbach’s race car post crash, as well as the state of the scene after the crash!

We were also able to get a video of the crash from the car’s onboard camera!! Check it out above!

Click past the jump to read what Paul had to say about this gut wrenching wreck.


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