2009 RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block

On occasion, we find extremely rare and desirable cars that roll across the auction block, but few are as pristine and well kept as this 2009 RUF CTR3 . Its beautiful chassis has only called one garage home while having traveled a mere 547 miles. They don’t come any better than this.

Although it looks like a modified Porsche 911 or Cayman , this is no chop job. The small German manufacturing company RUF designed and built the CTR3 from the ground up, using only a handful of original Porsche parts in creating perhaps one of the top supercars ever produced.

The CTR3 starts off with the front crash zone, floor pan, and hood of a 911 GT3 RS delivered directly from the Porsche assembly line. RUF then added the mid-mounted engine cradle and integrated roll cage. Adding to the car’s safety are Porsche production GT3 doors with integrated side-impact braces. A modified 3.8-liter, twin-turbo flat-six is then fitted snugly behind the passenger compartment. It powers the rear wheels through a six-speed sequential transmission. A massive 750 horsepower and 708 pound-feet of torque move to 3,086-pound car from 0 to 60 mph in a scant 3.1 seconds.

Bringing the car to a halt are four 15-inch, carbon-ceramic rotors clamped by six-piston aluminum calipers front and rear. Huge 265/35ZR19 tires up front and massive 335/30ZR20 tires out back grip the road. The CTR3’s track is five inches wider than a standard 911 and the wheelbase has grown 10.8 inches, while the overall length hasn’t changed. The beautiful rear suspension set up is a multi-link arrangement while the front uses the 911’s MacPherson struts.

Only 31 CTR3s were ever made and this particular example is for sale in California. It was imported into the U.S. in 2009 to an owner who never had it registered. It was then shipped back to Germany in 2012 for upgrades including a bump in horsepower to its current output. Even with its outrageous power, it still meets all federal emissions standards and is completely street legal. Current asking price is unknown, but other CTR3s have sold for $400,000 plus. Head over Canepa to see the RUF’s actual listing.

Click past the jump for photos and info on RUF and this 2009 CTR3

Source: Canepa

2009 RUF CTR3

RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block

Exterior

RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block
RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block
RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block
RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block
RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block

Interior

RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block
RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block
RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block

Engine Bay

RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block
RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block
RUF CTR3 Rolls Across Auction Block

RUF: The Back Story

It all began with one man and a company named after himself in 1939. Alois Ruf Sr. ran a tiny service garage in Pfaffenhausen, Germany. He eventually grew the garage into a full-service gas station by 1949. During that time, Alois had started developing his own automotive designs and in 1955 he designed and built his first tour bus.

The popularity of his tour bus around Germany became large enough that Alois started a separate company for his second business endeavor. RUF’s first involvement with sports cars started when his son, Alois Jr., became obsessed with repairing and restoring Porsches in the 1960s. Then in 1974, Alois Sr. passed away leaving the company to is son, who at the time was only 24 years old.

Alois Jr. took control of the company and redirected its focus to building performance Porsches, particularly 911s. RUF debuted their first complete build in 1977 – a Porsche 930 with a stroked 3.3-liter engine. Throughout the years, RUF has won numerous awards and speed records, and continues to build their reputation as a premium supercar builder. The rest, as they say, is history.

All images are credited to the Canepa Collection and are used with permission


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