2011 (maybe 2012) Ford Explorer rendered, again

While we are all sitting around and waiting to see the final production version of the 2012 Ford Explorer, all we seem to get are more and more renderings of the future Explorer . The Australian magazine, Car Advice, revealed today new details on the future SUV that will be released at the end of the year along with a computer generated rendering as seen above.

For the 2012 Explorer, Ford will use a 2.0-liter turbocharged, directly injected, four-cylinder EcoBoost engine that will find its way to a few other products as well. There will also be a more powerful 3.5-liter Ecoboost with 355 hp (265 kW / 360 PS) and 350 lb-ft (474 Nm) of torque, which, according to Ford, should give the Explorer "best-in-class fuel economy and V6 performance." The Explorer will also be made of a unibody construction that will allow for a decrease in weight that, in turn, will provide better fuel economy.

The Explorer will also share Land Rover ’s Terrain Response traction control system. The terrain management program will provide appropriate traction for any driving conditions the road may present to the driver using powertrain and braking controls. The system is utilized by a console-mounted, switchable knob that can provide assistance through normal driving conditions, mud, sand, and snow.

Source: Caradvice

6 comments:

The vehicle provides excellent ride and handling characteristics, a comfortable and roomy cabin, and strong power and a high towing capacity on V8 models.

I only bring it up because I can’t think of anything else noteworthy about it. Did Explorers also become exciting during that time frame? It’s always seemed toward the bottom of the SUV pile; all of the truck-like ride of a traditional SUV without any of the off-road capability.

Too much design language from the Range Rover. And that front fascia is on the whole lineup. I like the smoother lines/front fascia of the focus and fiesta.

What is a novelty "hailing again from the Rover domain" though is a terrain management system with a total of five settings.

The new electronics also eliminates the need for a heavy and fuel-economy sapping transfer case by using existing power train and brake systems to modulate wheelspin and power distribution.

That cut line isn’t added in the Photoshop—it’s on the real car. Looks awkward in photographs, but it works in person because in person the vehicle is 3D and you get that the cut line disappears because of the wheel bulge.

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