Atomic Hot Rods Releases New Promo Video

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Something that is really incredible about the Olympic Games is how enthralling it can be to hear the winning athletes talk about their sport. Even if the sport is something the viewer has never done or even seen, hearing an expert break it down can really bring it to life.

That is the mood from Brian Darwas in the latest promo for his mastercraft custom car shop, Atomic Hot Rods . He walks us through his vision for the hot rod ’s final state: authentic and real are the goals, so much that a bystander cannot tell if the car was made into a hot rod in 2002 or 1952.

There’s a real art to his craft and a beauty to bringing dead cars back to the roads. The best part of this expert promo video? The car (or one quite similar) featured within is for sale. A one-of-a-kind 1932 Ford Roadster with an all-steel Brookville Body is currently on the market from Atomtic Hot Rods.

Click past the jump to watch the promo video, featuring Brian Darwas and Atomic Hot Rods.

Atomic Hot Rods - Promo Video

Clearly trained in both film-making and metal grinding, Mr. Darwas features and narrates the action we see unfold inside Atomic Hot Rods. This is clearly a very passionate man, and one for whom every painstaking hour helps create even more special custom creations.

The 1932 Ford Roadster he has for sale is a great showpiece of his work and abilities. In addition, the hand-made nature of these projects mean a wealthy buyer could choose a much louder and more flamboyant paint job - if it could have been done in 1952!

Press Release

Atomic Hot Rods For Sale: 1932 Ford Roadster

Atomic Hot Rods Releases New Promo Video
  • 1932 Roadster, all steel Brookville Body. The car sits on a ‘32 Frame with stock front and rear cross members (the rear cross member has been flattened to bring the back of the car down for a better stance).
  • 1949-’53 Ford Flathead motor (8BA) capped with high compression Offenhauser heads (8.6:1). The engine is fed by an Offenhauser 2x2 intake (with two 94’s).
  • Dropped axle upfront with lengthened and split Model A wishbones (to match the length of ’32 wishbones). Ford nine inch out back held in place by 1937 Ford (rear) wishbones (with gusseted top links for added strength).
  • 1953 Buick steering wheel. ’32 dash with a finned aluminum gauge cluster and glove box.
  • The car was built by us a few years back and has been on the road. It does have a couple of little marks here and there in the paint, it’s a driver.


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