Equus Bass770 Was Built Using 3D Printed Components

The all-new Equus Bass770 is the dream of every classic muscle car fan. It takes retro look, adds a dash of bad-ass a whole heaping load of horsepower. This labor of love is more than a rocking way to cruise town, as Equus is using some of the most advanced construction techniques ever devised to create its prototypes. Mostly it is using various methods of 3D printing to create molds and parts for interior, trim and small body pieces.

WELCOME TO FREAKING FUTURE!

Thanks to these processes, Equus was able to try out new parts and ideas quickly and cheaply. When it comes to prototyping, speed and cost are key. Depending on the size of the part, it can have an entirely new one made in a couple hours.

This type of creation also gives Equus the ability to make small changes quickly. If you make apiece that doesn’t quite fit, adjust the dimensions in your PC file, and reprint a new one in a few hours. Aside form helping Equus create an amazing looking retro slab of awesome, this technology can be expanded to every automaker to help make every car a little bit better.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Equus Bass770.

Why it Matters

It may not seem like much, but with Equus proving this type of technology usage is feasible, it opens the doors to other manufacturers to do the same. Soon, we could have beautiful, well-made and interesting trim in some of the cheapest cars on the market. As a bonus, having cheaper R&D costs could ultimately result in vehicle MSRPs decreasing, as the automakers have less overhead and design costs to recoup.

It really is a win-win for everyone involved.

2014 Equus Bass770

Equus Bass770

The Equus Bass 770 is a resto-mod style car that is being produced in quantity. It follows after brands like Icon and Singer in creating modernized versions of some of the world’s favorite cars. While Icon and Singer actually modify and create around cars that already exist, the Bass 770 is an entirely new car that takes its inspiration form the classic metal of the 60s and 70s.

Just like the classic muscle of the era, there can never be enough power under the hood of a car like this. To make sure buyers never want for speed or grunt, the Bass770 has been fitted with the supercharged LS9 V-8 from a Corvette ZR1.That means 640 horsepower, a sub-four-second 0-to-60 time and a top speed around 200 mph.

Yes, please.


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