> 

Ferrari Threatening Journalists With a $70k Fine for LaFerrari Leaks

If you have ever wondered why TopSpeed.com doesn’t get to do many in-person reviews on Ferraris , this might help explain things. Certain car makers are very picky, and apply lots of heavy restrictions to their car reviews. According to Jalopnik, Ferrari has now started making writers agree to a $70,000 fine if they break embargo times for the Ferrari LaFerrari.

Basically, if I got to drive the Ferrari LaFerrari , and I wanted to talk to you about it today, it would cost me $70,000. If I waited a few weeks to tell you, it wouldn’t cost me a dime. It seems strange, but this is the amount of power that some of these exotic and exclusive companies wield. On top of these types of restrictions, Ferrari has a very short list of “approved” journalists that are allowed behind the wheel of their machines.

That is not to say that we wouldn’t play ball. Our most important site feature is you guys and gals, the readers. As absurd as a massive fine for talking about a car early may seem, we would jump through almost any hoop to get you guys the cool stories and awesome drives you deserve. We just aren’t on that short list yet.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari LaFerrari.

Source: Jalopnik

Why It Matters

This goes to show just how competitive our business is. Not only is there a $70k fine for releasing the information early, but we’re willing to bet that there are a few journalists willing to release the info a little early.

Ferrari LaFerrari

Ferrari LaFerrari

The Ferrari LaFerrari, is the latest in the decades-old line of range-topping supercars that include the Enzo and F40.

The LaFerrari is direct competitor of metal like the Porsche 918 and the McLaren P1. Just like those other supercars, the LaFerrari makes use a specialized hybrid powertrain. Thanks to combination of battery power and a 6.3-liter V-12, the LaFerrari can send 963 horsepower to the ground.

Ferrari claims that much grunt is enough to get the LaFerrari to 60 mph in less than 3 seconds, and up to a top speed greater than 217 mph. If 217 sounds like an odd number to be “more than” it translates over to 350 km/h. Makes more sense now, huh?

Regardless of how you want to look at it, this machine is going to be the fastest road-legal thing with doors to ever come out of the factory at Maranello.


What is your take?

Back to top