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GM Recalls all Current Generation Chevrolet Camaro Models

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2014 turned out to be a terrible year for General Motors as far as recalls go, and things aren’t likely to change very soon. With more than one million vehicles to worry about, GM is now facing another major recall, this time surrounding the current-generation Chevrolet Camaro . Not just the 2012 and 2013 model year ZL1s we reported about last week, which will have their defective superchargers replaced for free, but the entire 2010 through 2014 Camaro production line. Specifically, GM is recalling all current generation Camaros after discovering that the ignition key might move out of the "run" position if the driver bumps the key fob with his knee.

The issue may affect drivers sitting close to the steering column and could cause reduction or sudden loss of power. The condition was discovered during internal testing following GM’s huge ignition switch recall earlier this year and it is currently linked to three crashes that resulted in four minor injuries, the automaker explained in a press bulletin. However, GM stresses that this issue is unrelated to the one affecting the vehicles included in the ignition switch recall.

To fix the issue, GM will replace the current key, which is concealed in the fob and is opened by pushing a button, with one that features a standard design. The new design will make the ignition key and fob independent from each other so that any contact with the fob won’t affect the key’s position.

A total of 511,528 2010 through 2014 model year Chevrolet Camaros are affected by this recall, 464,712 of which have been sold in the United States. The remaining coupes and convertibles have been delivered to Canada and Mexico, and shipped overseas. There’s no info as to when this recall will begin, but GM will notify Camaro owners by mail as to when they can bring their vehicles into Chevrolet dealerships for repairs. The keys will be replaced at no cost to the owners, who will also receive courtesy transportation as needed.

Click past the jump to read more about GM’s Camaro recall.

Why It Matters

With more than 450,000 Camaros recalled in the U.S. alone, GM dealerships are set to become awfully crowded over the next months. Replacing the key fob should be an easy fix, but this new issue casts yet another dark cloud over GM’s past and current products, and raises even more concern in regard to safety. The good news is that GM seems to have learned its lesson. The company’s more recent issues have been discovered during internal testing, which means GM is set to eliminate every bug in the system. Granted, that’s not an easy task, but it sure helps reduce the number of crashes caused by such glitches.

Chevrolet Camaro

Chevrolet Camaro

The fifth-generation Chevrolet Camaro stormed dealerships in late 2009 for the 2010 model year. It was the first Camaro available since the previous generation’s production ended in 2002. The production model is based on a concept car that was showcased in 2006 and received its first and only facelift in the 2014 model year.

The current lineup includes four models. The base version is powered by a 3.6-liter V-6 that generates 323 horsepower and returns the most mpg on the highway in its class at 30. Next in line is the Camaro SS , which carries a 6.2-liter, V-8 unit under the hood and can be had in two different flavors: 400 horsepower and 410 pound-feet of torque with an auto trans or 426 horsepower and 420 pound-feet with a manual trans.

Sitting at the top of the range is the supercharged Camaro ZL1 . The blown, 6.2-liter, V-8 mill delivers a whopping 580 ponies and 556 pound-feet of torque, making it the most powerful Camaro to date.

Lastly, there’s the track-ready Z/28 model that takes its juice from a naturally aspirated, 7.0-liter powerplant. Although the unit is rated at "only" 505 horsepower and 481 pound-feet of torque, the stripped interior and the race-spec parts make the Z/28 faster than the ZL1 on the track.

Production of the current generation Camaro will come to a halt next year , when a brand-new model will hit auto shows and showrooms.

GM’s this year recall list

GM Recalls all Current Generation Chevrolet Camaro Models

Press Release

General Motors will recall all current generation Chevrolet Camaros because a driver’s knee can bump the key FOB and cause the key to inadvertently move out of the “run” position, with a corresponding reduction or loss of power.

The issue, which may primarily affect drivers sitting close to the steering column, was discovered by GM during internal testing following the ignition switch recall earlier this year.

“Discovering and acting on this issue quickly is an example of the new norm for product safety at GM,” said Jeff Boyer, vice president of GM Global Safety.

The Camaro ignition system meets all GM engineering specifications and is unrelated to the ignition system used in Chevrolet Cobalts and other small cars included in the ignition switch recall.

GM is aware of three crashes that resulted in four minor injuries that it believes may be attributed to this condition.

The company will change the Camaro key to a standard design from one in which the key is concealed in the FOB and is opened by pushing a button. The change will make the ignition key and FOB independent of each other, so that inadvertent contact with the FOB won’t move the key from the “run” position. There are 464,712 Camaros from the 2010-2014 model years in the U.S. included in the recall. Including Canada, Mexico and exports, the total recall population is 511,528.

Separately, GM also announced two safety recalls and one non-compliance recall involving a total of 65,121 cars in the U.S. all three of which were reported to the NHTSA on Wednesday, June 11, 2014. Including Canada, Mexico and exports, the total recall population is 69,839.

In all cases, customers will receive letters from GM letting them know when they can bring their vehicles into a dealership, where the recall repairs will be performed free of charge and courtesy transportation would be provided as needed.




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