Lamborghini Not Planning a Competitor for Hybrid Supercars

Lamborghini has no plans to enter the hybrid supercar market, which means that dreams of a Lambo taking on the Porsche 918 Spyder , McLaren P1 and Ferrari LaFerrari can now be put to rest. Lamborghini president and CEO Stefan Winkelmann put the kabosh on ice, saying that there’s no way a supercar market can sustain building hybrid exotics and expect them to be produced as normal production cars. It’s a niche market for the time being, and the obscene price tags attached to these models is not, in Winkelmann’s words, "fulfillable at the time being".

“What you see now — and I don’t want to be, let’s say, finger pointing — but what you see now in the world of the hybrids is not something which is going to be in normal production cars; due to cost, or due to weight if the cost is a normal one,” Winkelmann told CarAdvice.

Feasibility is a big thing for Lamborghini and the idea of building a hybrid supercar just isn’t one, especially when it’s in the business of selling as many of its already awesome naturally aspirated exotics like the Aventador and the recently-launched Huracan .

Tacking a million-dollar price tag on a hybrid supercar isn’t a market that’s sustainable even if P1 and the LaFerrari sales go through the roof. In some ways, the car’s exclusivity is what’s making these sales figures rise up. But if Ferrari or McLaren decide to offer the LaFerrari and the P1 as normal production cars, it’s going to be difficult for them to maintain a significant market of customers willing to pay that kind of premium.

That kind of thinking is more than enough reason for Lamborghini to do away with thoughts of joining the party. If the costs go down and interest is still there, then Lambo could probably change its mind, but for now, it’s not a road Winkelmann is comfortable leading Lamborghini to.

Click past the jump to read about the 2015 Lamborghini Huracan

Source: CarAdvice

Lamborghini Huracan

Lamborghini Huracán LP 610-4

Keeping with Lamborghini traditions, the Huracan is named after a famous bull from 1897. The suffix indicates, that the car that replaces the Gallardo is powered by a 610-horsepower engine and employs all-wheel drive. Seems like a good start, then.

With the Huracan adopting a family face of sorts, borrowed from Aventador, what we have here is a supercar that looks that match its character. Following its take over by Audi, the Aventador came along as the next-generation supercar, and the Huracan follows on a similar design philosophy as its elder cousin.

The mid-mounted, 5.2-liter V-10 develops 610 horsepower at 8,250 rpm and 413 pound-feet of torque at 6,500 rpm. Coupled to a seven-speed, dual-clutch automatic, the Huracan does 0 to 60 mph in just 3.2 seconds and has a top speed of 202 mph.


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