Rare Ford GT X1 TT is up for sale for $450,000

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More V-8 supercar news. This time it is an American car with a massively powerful V-8 in the form of a Ford GT X1 TT . This highly modified Ford GT has been worked up on by Rich Brooks from the The GT Guy LLC. The engine in this car puts out no less than 1000 horsepower.

Ford built the Ford GT in 2004 as a replacement for the Le Mans winning Ford GT40. The company produced just over 4000 units of the GT. The standard car was powered by a 5.4-liter V-8 coupled with a supercharger.

The thirsty configuration was able to put down 550 horsepower. The car was designed along the lines of the original with flared rear haunches and low roof line. It was pretty unique car this.

Rich Brooks was able to double the output by adding a twin-turbo contraption to the already powerful 5.4-liter V-8 to a rare, limited edition Ford GT X1. Just 30 examples were ever built as part of a deal with the Genaddi Design Group.

The twin-turbo 1000 horsepower V-8 was then called the Ford GT X1 TT. At present, the car is in the U.S. with 3700 miles on the odometer and is up for sale for $450,000.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ford GT

Ford GT

Ford GT

I like the Ford GT. Yes, it is brash in its own way. But, that’s how supercars are supposed to be. The engine is not built to please Greenpeace either. The 5.4-liter V-8 engine does not sip fuel but gulps instead. It is a mental.

A twin-scroll supercharger feeds pressurized air into the combustion chamber in order to generate over 550 horsepower and 500 pound-feet of torque which is available at your command at as low as 3750 rpm.

As far as the transmission is concerned, no dual-clutch setup here. A good-old h-pattern manual gearbox sits in the middle of the raised central tunnel. You sit low with a large, almost vertical bank of round dials dominating the scene. With a dab of throttle, the supercharger whine just rings in the ear while the rear tires struggle for grip. It is a special car, this.


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