Review: 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour

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The Honda Accord has been the Iron Man of the midsize sedan market for generations. Now, with the great Accord name on the back, Honda has created an all-new version of the family sedan. Meet the Accord Crosstour, which adds a touch of modern versatility and a premium ride to the Accord lineup.

The Crosstour is Honda’s take on the swoopy five-door coupe-like crossover that seems to be making its rounds in the automotive world. So, is the new Crosstour good enough to be called an Accord?

If you think this design is new then you would be quite mistaken. The 2010 Accord Crosstour is just another five-door utility in the market. BMW has the X6 , Toyota has the Venza , and Acura has the ZDX.

Amazingly, despite being nearly the same company, the Acura ZDX is not at all similar to the Crosstour. The ZDX is based on a truck chassis, while the Crosstour is pure Accord.

Hit the jump to keep reading.

The Crosstour is nearly the same size as the Accord sedan, with only an extra 3-inches in length, though it can be very hard to tell when the two are side by side. The Crosstour just seems so much longer.

Honda has given the Crosstour a few design elements from the Accord coupe, like the headlights and taillights. Up front, the massive thick grille gives the car a big, blunt look.

From the side, the Crosstour’s short glass, high beltline, and fast sloping roof give the car a very muscular stance. Trimmed rocker panels add more style to the lower body.

Review: 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour

Around back, the Crosstour gets the Insight ’s dual-glass rear hatch, which is a hate it or love it feature, and dual chrome exhaust outlets. There is a small spoiler that cuts across the rear glass, helping too obscure visibility from the rear view mirror.

The test EX-L came with 18-inch alloy wheels, but 17-inch wheels are available.

Inside, the Accord Crosstour has the same styling as the Accord sedan. The upswept dash, intuitive layout, neat blue dials, and wood trim give the car a very upscale look.

The seats are supportive, with standard 10-way power for the driver and 4-way for the passenger. The EX-L adds leather, memory, and heat.

Steering wheel controls for audio and climate are standard, as well as Bluetooth, which was fairly easy to set up.

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Interior space is a bit of a letdown, as legroom, shoulder, and headroom all come up short to the Toyota Venza. The seatbacks fold 60/40 by pulling the handles in the cargo bay or buttons on the back of the seat.

It’s in the cargo department where the Crosstour really shines. The cargo lip is low for easy loading and, with the seats down, there is plenty of room for almost anything. There are three trays under the floor of the cargo area for dirtier items. The center tray lifts out and can be used as a cooler on road trips or picnics.

The 2010 Accord Crosstour comes with a 3.5-liter V6 with 271 horsepower and 254 pound-feet of torque, tied to a front-drive 5-speed automatic. Sadly, the gearbox lacks a sport shift option.

Review: 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour

The test car came with the same single speed four-wheel drive system that is found in the CR-V . Despite the 4WD badge on the back, we wouldn’t advise going offroading, as this vehicle is more car than SUV.

On the roads, the Crosstour feels like a large car. That being said, it feels strong and accelerates hard from a standstill.

Fuel economy is rated at 18 City/27 Highway on regular gas which is average for this sort of vehicle.

The suspension design is like the Accord’s, with double-wishbone front and multi-link rear. The Crosstour’s setup has been beefed up a bit in order to carry the added weight.

Review: 2010 Honda Accord Crosstour

The driving experience is a brilliant one. It’s agile and feels like a heavier Accord. The ride is smooth and comfortable and the Crosstour is able to take corners better than most cars of similar size.

The rear spoiler cuts right across the rear view mirror so rear visibility is a bit hampered.

Price wise, the base Crosstour starts at $30,380, while the upper end EX-L with four-wheel drive starts at $34,730. That puts the Crosstour well above the Venza in terms of cost.


9 comments:

It seemed that most companies are now using Facebook as their tool to promote their new products or announcements; From this unit, I am not impressed with its overall performance but rather mesmerized with the design. Somehow, I know it’ll be fun to check out this vehicle off the road but am in doubt of its additional features.

I know Honda’s not doing super hot right now but come on guys! A product placement deal with Gillette? Slapping a Mach 3 on the front end? At least when a product’s featured in a movie you’re not forced to stare at it every morning before heading into work.

This only gets 2mpg better than an Odyssey? I vote for the station wagon model that is coming as an Acura - but I want different front end styling on it. Honda really needs to rethink their designs.

It looks so plain. I guess it all ends up into the interior design.

it looks great, but not that much appealing as the mazdaspeed 6 crosstour and camry crosstour.

I’m guessing 99% of AB readers aren’t in the target market for this car... including myself. But my wife just like the authors thinks it looks good and that’s what really matters. I would guess that 85% of Crosstour buyers are female

This is a vehicle like a buddy of mine had in the 80s....the Mazda 626...it makes lots of sense, drives like a car and in convenient to load and unload...its what the Verza is not...that is another class of vehicle, more like the Edge, Murano, etc.

In mexico, the accord is used as a public car in mexico.

I am not a Honda owner and did not like this car when it was released, but I looked at one at a new car show and I really liked it. I do like the usefulness of hatch backs, I have a 03 Matrix and love it.

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