> 

Ultimate Factories - Bentley Mulsanne

In the wake of what has been a busy week covering the 2011 Geneva Motor Show, we kind of left out a few important things taking shape this week, including the latest episode of National Geographic’s "Ultimate Factories".

The show, which actually airs tonight, will feature the latest handiwork of one of the world’s most exclusive and luxurious car brands, Bentley and their flagship luxury car, the Mulsanne .

Far and away, the Bentley Mulsanne is one of the most detailed cars to be built these days. Taking up well over nine weeks to build this precious masterpiece, the Mulsanne is finely-manicured to and designed with the greatest of care by the engineers working at the company’s production facility. One of the key ingredients that make up this world-class luxury car is the fine leather that’s personally hand-sewn by the people at Bentley Woodshop.

Seeing as the Mulsanne has over 300 wood panels and one panel takes over an hour to fully craft, you can imagine just how far and extensive Bentley goes to ensure that their customers receive nothing but the best in the Mulsanne.

To get you amped up for tonight’s episode, you can check out the teaser video National Geographic made.

Source: National Geographic


4 comments:

It seems that a series of quality control were made for a single set of this woods. I can’t believe that 33 people were working for a single car.. this really shows on how great this thing was crafted. This is definitely a great piece of art.

Nice.. I really love to see on how things were built. For the Bentley, I have seen on how skillful were these men working for the wood part of the car. And I think those woods comes in a higher standard.

Now I see why this cars cost a lot in the market. The way they build this car can be considered as an art in itself, what with all those hand made parts.

I am really a big fan of this series and haven’t missed a single episode yet. This one with Bentley also look rather interesting. I am really not into those cars, but it still amazes me how they were able to build them.

*Registration is required to post in this forum

Back to top