Unique Aston Martin DB4GT auctioned for $4,9 million

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Things went pretty great for Aston Martin during this weekend: next to unveiling the CC100 Speedster , the company also obtained a record auction price for a unique DB4GT. The car was part of the Aston Martin Centenary Sale at Aston Martin Works on 18 May 2013, which totaled a record total of over £10 million (more than $15 million), with every lot sold.

The DB4GT was auctioned for an impressive amount of £3,249,500 (a little over $4.9 million) - the highest ever price paid for an Aston Martin at auction.

However, this is not a regular DB4GT: it is nicknamed "The Jet" and was the last DB4GT to be built. The model is a one-off edition and has been designed by the Italian design house Bertone. The model was unveiled at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show.

This unique DB4GT won a total of 12 awards, including first in class at Pebble Beach and the Hurlingham Club, and best in show at Villa d’Este.

Click past the jump to read more about the Aston Martin DB4GT.

Aston Martin DB4GT

Aston Martin unveiled the DB4 in 1958 and the GT version arrived in September, 1959. When compared to the standard DB4, the GT version received enclosed headlights and a thinner aluminium skin for lighter weight.

The DB4GT delivered a total of 302 horsepower and was capable to sprint from 0 to 60 mph in 6.1 seconds and up to a top speed of 151 mph.

A total of 75 DB4GT units were built, with 19 of them being modified by Zagato and one by Bertone and called "The Jet."

Press Release

A unique Aston Martin DB4GT fetched a world record price of £3,249,500, the highest ever price paid for an Aston Martin at auction, when it went under the hammer as part of the Aston Martin Centenary Sale at Aston Martin Works on 18 May 2013. The sale itself also realised a record total of over £10 million, with every lot sold.

The annual Bonhams auction of Aston Martin and Lagonda cars, the 14th to be held at Aston Martin Works, celebrated 100 years of the marque and had the distinction of being the first major event to make use of the new Heritage Showroom, the final stage of the major redevelopment of the historic Aston Martin Works site.

The DB4GT, nicknamed ‘The Jet’, was the last DB4GT to be built. It is the only one of its kind, with coachwork by Italian design house Bertone, and made its debut at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show. It was one of the first design commissions for Giorgetto Giugiaro, who would go on to become one of the most celebrated automotive designers of our time.

The previous owner commissioned Aston Martin Works to restore the DB4GT to concours condition, which went on to win 12 awards, including first in class at Pebble Beach and the Hurlingham Club, and best in show at Villa d’Este.

Other lots sold included several ‘barn find’ Aston Martin models, including a 1964 DB5 coupe in original condition and with fewer than 48,000 miles on the clock. In need of restoration after 30 years off the road, the DB5 fetched £320,700.

Kingsley Riding-Felce, Managing Director of Aston Martin Works, said: “This year’s Bonhams sale was a great success, with 197 lots finding new buyers and more than 2,000 customers and enthusiasts taking part. It was the first event to make use of the fully refurbished Olympia Building which now houses our Heritage Showroom, and that made the day all the more special.

“The Heritage Showroom allows customers to take advantage of the vast knowledge and experience of the Aston Martin Works team, whether for sales, service or our world-renowned restoration division. We can now provide the unique experience of being able to view and compare cars from every era of Aston Martin’s 100 years.”

Jamie Knight, Bonhams Group Motoring Director commented: “As ever the day was tremendous, with both Bonhams and Aston Martin Works contributing much to ensure this was once again one of the highlight sales on the global auction calendar. ‘The Jet’ realising the highest price ever achieved for an Aston Martin here at Newport Pagnell was a fitting tribute in the marque’s Centenary Year.”


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