Video: Scary Crash Sends Porsche 911 RSR Into a River

We can’t even begin to imagine how harrowing an experience it is to crash a car at high speeds. That’s the kind of scenario we wouldn’t wish on anybody, even our worst enemies.

But some people just don’t have the luck, or safety bearings, as other people. In this particular case, it was a combination of both things. At the recent Hellendoorn Rally in the Netherlands, driver Harry Kleinjan was driving a Porsche 911 RSR during the rally when the brakes presumably locked on one bend, sending Kleinjan and his navigator straight into a cement barricade.

But the crash itself wasn’t the scariest thing to happen to the two; it was what happened after it.

Upon hitting the cement barrier, the 911 RSR immediately shot off the ground, smacked the barricade another time sending the wheels off of the race car before flipping over and hurtling straight into a river on its head. It’s the kind of scary crash that you normally see in movie, except that in the latter’s case, those crashes are planned and staged.

Neither happened on this occasion but fortunately, both Kleinjan and his navigator escaped their all-too-real brush with death without any serious injuries.

In the end, that’s the most important thing and given how the 911 RSR pretty much flew off the track, them coming out of the ordeal with their limbs intact was a bigger win than crossing the finish line first.

Click past the jump to read about the newest line of this successful racer, the 2013 Porsche 911 GT3 RSR

Source: YouTube

2013 Porsche 911 GT3 RSR

Porsche 911 GT3 RSR

The newest version of the 991-Series 911 GT3 RSR was unveiled just in time to celebrate 50 years of the Porsche 911.

For this model, a series of updates were given to make the race car ready for any competition around the world. These updates include a new wishbone front suspension replacing the previously used McPherson struts and a particularly lightweight racing gearbox. Under the hood the racing version keeps the same 460 horsepower 4.0-liter six-cylinder boxer engine as it predecessor.


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