Vince Megna Files the First Lemon Law Claim Against Tesla Motors

Tesla’s legal team has yet another case added to their already cluttered desks as the self-described "King of Lemon Laws" attorney Vince Megna files a suit against the California automaker with allegations of a defective product. Already contending with the New Jersey car sales ban fiasco, Tesla must now confront the auto industry’s most notorious lawyer and his Franklin, Wisconsin-based client.

The issues apparently started when Megna’s client purchased a Tesla Model S in March of 2013 for a cool $98,000. Shortly after delivery, the car had troubles starting and holding a charge. With no dealers around, the car had to be towed an hour and a half south to Chicago, IL. Over the first five months of ownership, the Model S spent a total of 66 days in the shop.

After attempting to have Tesla buy back the car on three separate occasions — as possible under the Federal government’s Lemon Law — the owners contacted Megna for help.

With a reputation for never going easy on automakers, Megna has been known to make short videos full of ironic humor, wit, and duct tape-wearing paralegals detailing his clients’ cases, just as you can see in the video above.

Be sure to stay tuned to TopSpeed for any developing information on Tesla’s first Lemon Law case.

Click past the jump for the video and to read more about the Tesla Model S.

Tesla Model S

Tesla Model S

Starting production in 2012, the Tesla Model S is the realization of entrepreneur Elon Musk and his goal of making electric cars a reality. Fed up with the public’s notion that electric cars were slow and ugly, he and his company designed and built the Model S.

Costing between $57,000 and nearly $100,000, the Models S is a luxurious four-door machine with a maximum cruising rang of over 300 miles. It’s track performance is respectable as well, doing 0 to 60 mph in just 4.5 seconds on its way to a 126-mph top speed.

Tesla’s Model S hasn’t been a stranger to bad publicity since its two instances of fire. However, the California automaker somehow seems to rebound after these headline-making ordeals.


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