Volkswagen presents new 3-cylinder turbodiesel

Volkswagen announced today that they will release the new 3-cylinder TDI engine at the 31st International Vienna Motor Symposium either today or tomorrow. This engine will be utilized in the Polo BlueMotion first and will deliver a total of 75hp and 180Nm at 2,000 rpm.

The specifications for the new 3-cylinder TDI called for the greatest possible dynamic engine performance with reduced displacement, maximum acoustic comfort, and systematic weight reduction – without compromising the engine’s thermodynamic efficiency. All of the advantages of a reduced number of cylinders – primarily reduced weight and friction power loss - are being exploited as well.

The International Vienna Motor Symposium will feature Professor Dr. Wolfgang Steiger, Head of Future Technologies in Group Communication, as he "discusses the future technology for power-trains, engine technology, and environmental impact from combustion engines in the world." Audi has chosen this event to debut their 3-cylinder TDI engine to illustrate its seriousness in providing a better product to protect the environment, improve fuel economy, and be easier on the wallet. These issues are the main focus at this particular symposium.

Press release after the jump.

Press release

Along with the presentation of a new 3-cylinder TDI, Volkswagen will be represented by a contingent of engine experts at the 31st International Vienna Motor Symposium. Its presentations in front of an international audience of engineers will focus on top values in CO2 emissions and fuel efficiency. However, another key issue that will be addressed is what conditions are crucial to achieving market penetration of alternative drives.

Professor Dr. Wolfgang Steiger, Head of Future Technologies in Group Communications, deals with such technical, societal and political requirements. In his lecture today in Vienna, Steiger explains: "Attitudes toward mobility are changing – not least of all due to the effects of the economic crisis and climate change – and are moving toward a sustainability perspective. Political entities around the globe react very differently to these issues, but they nearly always end up focusing on the promotion of electric mobility."

Steiger adds that long distance and freight transportation will continue to rely on internal combustion engines with highly efficient drive systems in the foreseeable future, so a long period of coexistence can be expected between E-technology and classic internal combustion engines.

Proving that such internal combustion engines can meet current and future demands – with top values in reduced emissions – is the new 1.2l TDI with 3 cylinders in the Polo BlueMotion. Despite its relatively small displacement, the 1.2l 55kW / 75PS TDI engine can deliver a torque of 180 Nm at 2,000 rpm. The specification for the new 3-cylinder TDI called for the greatest possible dynamic engine performance with reduced displacement, maximum acoustic comfort and systematic weight reduction – without compromising the engine’s thermodynamic efficiency. All of the advantages of a reduced number of cylinders – primarily reduced weight and friction power loss - are being exploited as well.


5 comments:

The specification for the new 3-cylinder TDI called for the greatest possible dynamic engine performance with reduced displacement, maximum acoustic comfort and systematic weight reduction – without compromising the engine’s thermodynamic efficiency.

It is built for economy. With low drag numbers it would work fine on the highway. I would even consider a VW if they would sell this in the US.

Basically Volkswagen really have the strong performance of engine so i guess 74HP is perfectly fine for a daily use.

suzuki also created their 3 cylinder version, and that is the Suzuki alto, but it’s displacement is only 1.1L good enough for a small car does it? but the this is a Full sized polo GTi so it really needs to have a higher displacement and a turbo kits installed on it.

Most of the commuter cars in Europe have 75-110hp. people use them to go to work and do their shopping (Europeans also shop less than Americans), not for drag races. Fuel consumption, safety and comfort are are the most important things, power is the last concern for most of the people in Europe.

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