car racing

car racing

  Car Racing in any way shape or form: F1, WRC, Nascar, NHRA, drag racing, monster trucks and more

As with most iterations of the Audi R18 race car , this year’s e-tron quattro machine has just received a number of updates ahead of the 24 Hours of Le Mans . The endurance event is scheduled to take place in mid-June in France.

Unlike the version used throughout the 2014 World Endurance Championship, the Le Mans racer’s body has been optimized for minimal aerodynamic drag, an essential property on Circuit de la Sarthe — an unusual track that consists of several long straights and high-speed turns.

The Le Mans body might not differ much at a first glance, but a closer look reveals the Germans have altered the fenders, which now have opening on the inside instead of at the top, and elongated the body at the rear, with the wing no longer hanging above the diffuser. Lastly, the exhaust configuration has also been changed and the tail pipes are now located above the diffuser, instead of exiting to the right and left of the huge central fin.

Through these updates, the R18 e-tron quattro will be capable of higher speeds, and aim for faster laps and average race speed. Last year, factory driver Andre Lotterer achieved an average speed of 150.37 mph on his fastest lap.

Audi will field three teams in this year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans race with the goal of winning its fifth consecutive even and the 12th title since 2000.

The powertrain of the R18 e-tron quattro in Le Mans configuration remains unchanged, with a revised, V-6, diesel engine motivating the rear wheels and with an e-tron quattro hybrid system spinning the front axle.

Click past the jump to read more about the Audi R18 e-tron quattro Le Mans.

Ever since Gran Turismo announced the Vision Gran Turismo Concepts last year, only two manufacturers have unveiled their video game-only concepts . On May 23rd, that number goes up to three, as Volkswagen announced that it was unveiling its own virtual Golf GTI that it created exclusively for Gran Turismo 6.

Volkswagen is keeping its concept on lock down until the end of the week, at which time we’re all going to finally see that superb hot hatch concept that’s been pining to be unleashed in GT6.

Ahead of its much-awaited debut, Volkswagen has released a teaser video of the concept, or at least the process that resulted in the creation of the concept. We don’t actually see it until the end of the video, and it only offered a short glimpse of what we’re all in store for, but the little we saw already has us salivating to see it in full guise, complete with the prominent front splitter, the large wheels, and the roof-mounted spoiler.

Added bonus goes to the old line of Golf GTI models that Mattel Hammerbeck and Domen Rucigaj, the two people behind the creation of the concept, were driving in the game. Kind of made us nostalgic for those old hatches.

Click past the jump to read more about the Volkswagen Golf GTI Vision Gran Turismo.

There aren’t a lot of things about this industry that can drive us to tears, but we there will be at least some flowing down when we see former Indy Racing League driver Sam Schmidt get behind the wheel of a specially prepared Chevrolet Corvette Stingray at the Indy 500. If you don’t know, Schmidt was paralyzed in a racing accident 15 years ago. But thanks to the SAM (semi-autonomous motorcar) Project, Schmidt will once again find himself doing what he used to do best.

The SAM Project is a collaborative venture to use technology to get disabled drivers driving again and at the Indy 500, the group plans to unveil a specially designed Corvette Stingray race car that has been customized to include integrated advanced electronics and a human-to-machine interface, allowing the driver to essentially drive the car through head movement and brake by biting down on a pressure sensor.

It’s an incredible setup that will be shown in full focus once Sam Schmidt gets inside the car. The paralyzed driver will be wearing a unique hat that’s been dotted with reflective infrared markers, allowing Schmidt to steer the car using his head alone, tilting left or right to steer and backward to accelerate. The Corvette will come with a series of infrared cameras that will capture Schmidt’s head movements. From there, a CPU translates these movements and turns them into commands, relaying the information to actuators found on the Corvette’s steering wheel, accelerator, and brakes.

Incredibly, the car is safe to drive around the race track, an incredible feat that came from a collaboration of a number of tech companies, including Arrow, a supplier of industrial electronics components, Ball Aerospace & Technologies, Schmidt Peterson Motorsports, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and the non-profit Falci Adaptive Motorsports.

For all of the incredible work put in by these companies to develop this equally amazing Corvette, the attention will deservedly belong to Sam Schmidt. It’s been 14 years since that horrific crash Florida’s Walt Disney World Speedway that resulted in him being paralyzed so it’s absolutely amazing that he’s in this position now where he can, at least for one day, find comfort in his racing element.

He’s only driving four laps at the Indy 500 festivities, but make no mistake, it’s going to be the most emotional four laps the Brickyard has had in recent memory.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Corvette C7 Stingray.

Source: Cnet
Posted on by Shanto  

It all started in 1956 when wealthy American businessman Tony Parravano hired the Italian manufacturer, Maserati to develop a new V-8 for use in the chassis of the Kurtis Indy. Maserati saw the opportunity to revive the project codenamed Tipo 54 and develop its own engine for use its sport-specific chassis. The original car carrying a V-6 engine with chassis number 3501 became the test bed for the car ordered by the American.

The 450S made its first appearance at the Swedish Grand Prix’s practice session in August 1956, stunning everyone with its tremendous acceleration and top speed. The car clocked the third best timing in the practice, but the underdeveloped car could not handle the vibrations resonating from the wrong firing order of the engine’s spark plugs. Afterwards, the 450S received a new chassis at Mondena factory.

The development continued and in 1957, the new production 450S was rolled out to have its maiden race at the 1000 km of Buenos Aires where it led the Ferrari twin-cam sports car by 10 seconds. The car suffered from a failed transmission and retired from the race. However, the car went on to claim its first ever podium finish in the 1957 Swedish GP. Sadly, FIA changed the rules next year, making 450S ineligible for the Grand Prix.

The car was quickly prepared for the 1956 Mille Miglia 1,000-mile race. Legendary driver Stirling Moss, along with Denis Jenkinson as navigator, experienced a brake failure and the car came to rest against a tree. Driver and co-driver walked away without a scratch, but the car had to return to the factory for repairs and further development.

Fantuazzi then came into picture when he designed a new body with a contoured design. The car also got a longer wheelbase to accommodate the new V-8 engine. The updated vehicle was tested in the Swedish Grand Prix in August 1956 where the car’s builders continued to tweak is new chassis and make improvements.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi.

Source: RM Aucions

We cover a lot of high-speed shenanigans here at TopSpeed, but this bit of news might take the cake for the fastest quarter-mile run we’ve seen in a long time. Then again, drag racing legend Don “Big Daddy” Garlits did set the world speed record for the fastest quarter mile time for an electric vehicle . Take a gander at the video above to see that ‘lectric sled complete the run in 7.258 seconds at 184.01 mph.

Through the shaky camera work, you’ll watch Garlits’ 2,000-horsepower electric dragster shoot from the starting line almost silently. With no exhaust noise, only the massive tires gripping the pavement is audible.

Making this possible is an array of lithium-polymer batteries comprised of four packs. The packs are divided up with two on each side of the car, with each pack containing 300 cells. The batteries produce 420 volts and 3,600 amps that feed six 7.5-inch series-wound DC motors. In total, the car produces 1,500 kilowatts, or roughly 2,000 horsepower.

Excluding those Top Fuel dragsters that rock massive hand-built V-8 engines snarling incomprehensible amounts of horsepower, this electric dragster might be the fastest thing on the planet. However, Garlits told Wired that he wouldn’t be satisfied till the car breaks the 200 mph barrier and drops the time into the six-second range.

Source: Wired

With all due respect to all other supercars in the world, there’s nothing quite like seeing a McLaren P1 dressed in all black and rampaging around a world famous circuit like the Spa-Francorchamps track in Belgium .

That’s exactly the sight a hand full of people witnessed when McLaren decided to hold what looks a testing session or track day event at Spa. The P1 was even accompanied by a few other McLaren models out enjoying their time out on track. Even still, it’s the P1 that really got all the attention.

This video further confirms the P1 falls within the ranks of those vehicles that appear to be in motion while merely sitting still. Those swooping lines and curvacious body panels exude so much emotion and evoke such a spirit of speed. What’s more, the short film captures the P1 actually carving the track, proving that it’s just as at home on the circuit as it is inside a collector’s garage.

The P1 had some shaky twitches in the start, something we’ll pin as the driver’s responsibility, but overall, the car looked planted and totally controlled throughout its time on the track.

How it must feel like to get behind the wheel of one...

Bragging rights are a funny thing when it comes to setting records in the auto industry. Everyone shoots for it and once they achieve it, they try to break their own records in an attempt to become better than...themselves. So excuse Subaru for trying to show that it’s better than what it was in 2011 when it set the four-wheeled lap record on the world-famous Isle of Man TT course. That’s because the Japanese automaker is shooting to break the 19 minutes and 56.7 second lap time it set three years ago with British rally champion Mark Higgins.

Later this month, Subaru will once again go to the Isle of Man, only this time it’s bringing the 2015 WRX STI performance saloon to the record attempt. Common sense suggests that since the old record was set by the WRX STI’s predecessor , the 2015 model should have little problem blowing that lap time record away, right?

Well, it’s still easier said than done, especially when you take into consideration how tricky it is to run through a lap without damaging the car. On that end, Subaru did its part by giving the WRX STI some sturdier safety equipment, including adjusting the springs and dampers, as well as fitting the car with a roll-cage, race harness and fire suppression system.

Preparation’s the easy part, but actually achieving what you set out for is the tough part. Hopefully, Higgins and Subaru get to toast to another year of having the fastest time around the Isle of Man TT course.

Pictured Above is Subaru’s 2011 record-setting run at the Isle of Man.

Click past the jump to read more about the Subaru WRX STi.

This Formula One season is looking more and more like a lost cause for every team on the grid not named Mercedes GP. Defending champion Red Bull will likely lose out on the title this year, so in order to pass the time – or at least make it interesting for the four-time champs – the team and its partner Infiniti have taken to launching a new video series called the "A to Z of Formula One."

As the title of the series implies, Sebastian Vettel, Daniel Ricciardo, Sebastien Buemi, Christian Horner, and Adrian Newey all take turns highlighting key aspects of Formula One tied to each letter of the alphabet.

Some are pretty self-explanatory like (A)erodynamics, (H)elmet, (F)ly-aways, and (I)nterlagos, but other letters represented some pretty interesting aspects of Formula One that are a little more obscure. Items like (C)omputational Fluid Dynamics, (D)rag Reduction System, and (K)inetic Energy Recovery System (or as it’s come to be known now, ERS) are interesting to listen to. What’s more is the excellent way the Red Bull guys explain the complex systems on a level that we all can understand.

The series runs in six different episodes, with the second to sixth episodes after the jump.

More videos after the jump.

There are literally a handful of cars in the history of the industry that’s revered more than the Ferrari 250 GTO . Really, you can probably count in one hand those models and we’re guessing you’re even going to have a hard time doing it. Such is the level of respect people have of this true classic. Consider how much a 250 GTO fetches in auctions these days. Last November, a variation of the 250 GTO - the 250 LM - sold for $14.3 million . But even that pales in comparison to the incredible $52 million price Connecticut-based collector Paul Pappalardo paid for a 1963 250 GTO. So yeah, unless there’s a DeLorean out there that actually flies, no car today - classic or modern - will even come close to sniffing that record purchase.

So imagine what it must have felt for Petrolicious to get its hands on a 250 GTO. In this video, Derek Hill, the son of former Formula One champion and Ferrari factory driver Phil HIll, managed to acquire a 1964 250 GTO. We can only wonder what it must have felt like to be entrusted with a car that probably has a higher value that the GDP of some countries. But if anybody understood the value of this car, it’s Hill. After all, his father actually raced this exact 250 GTO at the Daytona Continental, which the older Hill ended up winning.

You really can’t understate the rarity of this particular GTO, chassis #5571. It’s actually one of the last GTOs ever built and was also the first of the Series II bodies and it came with a 3.0-liter V-12 engine that produces 300 horsepower.

Not that we’re pining for it to hit any kind of auction in the future, but can you imagine how much it would fetch in a setting like that? It’s not just a 250 GTO; it’s a 250 GTO with a real racing history attached to it.

North of $50 million? We’d be fools not to at least consider it.

BMW has a rich history of building safety cars for some of the world’s biggest racing series. This year, the M4 Coupe has joined Beamer’s safety car family when it made its debut at the start of the 2014 DTM season.

The M4 Coupe joins the 1 Series M Coupe , the M3 , the M5 , and the M6 Gran Coupe in that list of BMWs that have been commissioned for safety car duties. That’s an impressive list, and to help celebrate the occasion, the M4 Coupe DTM Safety Car was given all the bells and whistles to successfully serve its purpose.

Obviously, the M4 Coupe DTM Safety Car is based on the road-going model. That being said, a lot of the usual components of the road version have been taken out in favor of installing the necessary safety equipment as required by FIA regulations.

It’s a comprehensive modification that clearly was done for a specific purpose, just like the past BMW models that have been lucky enough to see duty as safety cars at one time or another.

The development of the M4 Coupe DTM Safety Car was also a case of good timing for BMW. There’s no better way to usher in the era of the M4 Coupe DTM Race Car than having one of its own in front of the pack – one that’s responsible for a lot more than just winning races and making podiums.

Click past the jump to read more about the BMW M4 Coupe DTM Safety Car


Back to top