Chevrolet Corvette

Chevrolet Corvette

  After six long and beautiful generations, the Chevrolet Corvette is just as much a hot commodity as it was in 1953 when the first concept was rolled out for all to see. This American-made sports car comes in four different trims: Standard, Grand Sport, Z06, and ZR1. The standard Corvette and the Grand Sport are both powered by a 6.2L V8 engine that pumps out 430hp and 424 lb-ft of torque. Add the upgraded exhaust system and the models get 436hp and 425 lb-ft of torque. The Grand Sport differentiates itself from the standard model with a few upgrades, Z06 styling cues, and its won gear and rear-axle ratios. The Corvette Z06 is powered by a 7.0L V8 engine producing 505hp and 470 lb-ft of torque and the newer ZR1 boasts a 6.2L supercharged V8 delivering 638hp and 604 lb-ft of torque to the table. All engines are mated to either a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic transmission.

The 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray hysteria is just reaching full steam, so please avert your eyes if you are already bored to tears with the legendary Vette.

But part of the hoopla is genuine excitement that Chevy has produced such a vastly-improved sports car. After a few different drives by the TopSpeed team, the similarities in what we observed in these two different C7 models are remarkable.

Two guys who were traditionally more anti-Corvette would be hard to find. So the shared observations about the handling, power, cabin and - especially - theC7’s vastly improved structural rigidity are a resounding vote of confidence in the new Corvette.

For skeptics, all we can say is try it out before you flock to Porsche or BMW for classy driving thrills.

My drive was up near Chicago in a blue C7 , whereas TopSpeed’s founder Philippe was lucky enough to take a top-off cruise around Miami in a white example.

With palm trees flying by the windows and the blue sky visible above Phil’s curly hair, the Miami Vice jokes are on the tip of my tongue. I will refrain, however, as my first Stingray review already ruffled some feathers among the Vette faithful.

But the red leather of Phil’s Stingray Z51 really looks right so close to the ocean and all the glamor of South Beach.

Click past the jump to enjoy this detailed TopSpeed First-Drive Video of the 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Z51, one of the first media outlets to sample the Vette with its targa top panel stowed in the giant trunk.

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By the early 1960s, the Corvette had triumphed over the Thunderbird and was now firmly America’s sports car for the second-gen’s arrival as a 1963 model. Car guys, pilots and engineers all over America had taken the lightweight-big engine formula to heart with their prized first-gen Corvettes , but now they wanted more performance by every measurement. Much more speed, in particular.

Chevrolet had similar ideas when brainstorming ways to replace the C1 as far back as 1957. The Q-Corvette concept was a working idea of a smaller, lighter and nimbler Corvette than ever before. Four-wheel discs were to be standard, and the car was could hold its own on a racetrack right off the showroom floor.

Over the C2’s relatively short time — until 1967 — this Corvette became the quickest factory machine ever in the quarter-mile with the 11.02 second time recorded by the 1967 Corvette L88 Sting Ray Convertible .

Click past the jump for the full history of the 1963-1967 Chevrolet Corvette C2, with highlights from two prize-winning concours examples.

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Guess who got his paws on a 2014 Corvette Stingray out in the wild this week?

The joy of hooning this hotly anticipated sports car was spoiled only by having to give it back to Chevy at the end of the day.

Are the touted enhancements to the cockpit, performance and road stance enough to put the C7 on the radar of young enthusiasts for the first time in decades? Or just a bald fatty special like the C5?

Much as the pace and V-8 bellow was to be admired in the C5 and C6, the Vette was too Plastic Fantastic to cause much of a sensation to the uninitiated. The old Vette’s key buyer group of Wal-Mart-shopping "rich" people certainly would not help any car’s cool factor.

But the C7 feels about a million miles from those two Extenze-popping machines.

Despite screeching performance and the all-conquering ZR-1, the C6 Vette was mired in image hell based on some of its buyers. An interior so low rent that catching crabs was a real possibility only confirmed suspicions that America’s Sports Car was just for creeps and perves.

Big, big changes for the C7 line. In a dream scenario this week, we found ourselves set loose in the C7. It was the meat of a day that also included a frightening hour in the Nissan GT-R (that left me trembling with delight) and a brief intro to the lumbering and oddly off-putting SRT Viper GTS .

But what to do in that Nirvana moment: a full tank of gas, the brand-new Chevrolet Corvette C7, and a heavy right foot? We cooked the tires, did a few straight-line blasts, and took as many pictures as the camera would hold.

Luckily, the impression this incredible car left is etched in the memory with the staying power of a brain tattoo.

Click past the jump for this exclusive TopSpeed Driven review of the 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray, with nearly 75 all-new, high-resolution images of the production model we sampled.

The anticipation for the new Corvette has been incessant for the better part of the year with journalist and Corvette fans clamoring for information on the all-new Stingray . Well, starting this month, the public can get a closer look at the Vette’s birthplace.

Chevrolet announced yesterday that tours of the Bowling Green Assembly Plant will resume Monday, October 14. The plant, which as been closed since last fall, underwent an extensive $131-million upgrade to its assembly equipment for the new 2014 Stingray. Plant tours are only $7 and include a one-mile hike around the production line for an intimate viewing of the processes that bring a C7 to life.

Along with the tours, Corvette’s Museum Delivery, Buyers Tour and Corvette Photo Album programs will resume as well. For a cool $990, buyers will have the opportunity to pick up their hot-off-the-press C7 at the National Corvette Museum next door to the assembly plant with the Museum Delivery package. Dropping another $800 affords buyers the chance at watching their very own Stingray roll down the assembly line while on an extended private tour. Finally, the whole assembly process can be documented and showcased in a 20-plus page, leather-bound photo album for a measly $700.

Tours will be open to the general public and run Monday through Friday at 8:30am, 11:30am, and 2:00pm CDT. Chevrolet says they recommend making reservations when planning a tour of your own.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Corvette Stingray.

Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

SRT had to slow production of the new Viper due to slow sales, while Chevy is having the exact opposite issue. The seventh-generation Corvette — AKA the Stingray — is starting to roll into dealers now, and General Motors officials are warning that customers could wait up to six months to get their car keys and many are paying up to $20k over the sticker price to get one.

Apparently the new Stingray ’s $51,995 base price makes it quite a hit among customers, as Chevrolet’s General Marketing Manager, Chris Perry, says the company has "six months’ worth of orders" and there are some dealers that have already sold out their initial stock.

Huge technological and construction advancements on the Stingray , like the new, aluminum frame and the extensive use of carbon-fiber body components, are the likely culprits for its initial success. Of course, we’re sure the shocking new design, the improved performance and enhanced fuel economy have helped sell models too.

Though some customers are willing to pay more for the new Corvette, GM is "frustrated" over the premium prices that dealers are raking in on the model. Of course, the only reason GM is frustrated is because it’s not raking in these extra profits...

If you don’t feel like waiting, there’s plenty of Vipers to go around...

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Corvette Stingray.

Posted on by Simona  

A few weeks ago, Chevrolet started shipping the seventh-generation Corvette to its local dealers, customers have already started enjoying their new sports car . Some of them decided to really push the car to the limits, and Hennessey reports this is the first customer-owned Stingray to run the quarter-mile, which it did in 12.23 seconds at 114.88 mph.

If you remember, a few days ago Rick Hendrick received the very first Corvette Stingray that he paid $1.1 million for at a Barrett-Jackson auction last January. But, he decided not to beat on his investment, leaving this as the first quarter-mile run by a customer-owned Stingray

The model that achieved this result was a 3LT trim level equipped with automatic transmission and a Z51 package. Along with the quarter-mile results, the VBox showed a 0 to 60 mph sprint time of 4.15 seconds (Chevrolet reported a sprint time of 3.8 seconds when Z51 package added) and 0-to-100 mph in 9.5 seconds. The slower 0-to-60 time can be linked to track conditions, tire temperature or many other variables, so don’t start trashing Chevy just yet.

Posted on by Simona  

About two weeks ago, the first truckload of 2014 Corvette Stingrays started their journey to Chevrolet dealers around the country. While customers get to enjoy driving the new American sports car , many likely won’t understand that thousands hours of work and hundreds of people involved in building the Corvette Stingray.

The new Stingray is assembled at the Chevy ’s plant in Bowling Green, Kentucky that required a a $131-million upgrade, including a $52-million investment for a new body shop to manufacture the car’s all-new, aluminum frame in-house for the first time.

Up to this point, the assembly line has produced about 1,000 units for customer deliveries and most of them are expected to be delivered to dealers over the next few weeks. Soon enough, we will start seeing this all-new Corvette roaming the roads of America.

Now, Chevrolet has released a video (above) showing the Stingray’s assembly process.

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Dream cars are such a regular and normal part of every car guy and gal’s life growing up. Waiting for that license, dreaming about the wild places you will go and friends you might meet. For generations of enthusiasts until the 1950s, however, such dreams were so unattainable they were foolish.

The only non-mass-market car around was the coach-built Phaeton from Rolls-Royce , Mercedes-Benz or Duesenberg .

Such was the gulf between the rich and poor at the time that it makes today’s 99-percent protests seem as ridiculous as they are. In those days, the ratio was more like 99.99999 percent versus the 0.00001 percent.

You can probably guess which group we and most young car shoppers would fall into. And it is not the one with the nines.

For a generation of hot-shot former military officers, pilots and engineers: coming home from the battle fronts of Europe and the Pacific had whet their appetites for speed. The enormous volume of men and women enchanted by steel machinery during wartime was unprecedented.

But coming home, the cars these speed demons found were lumbering, great heavy beasts with no power and little cornering ability whatsoever. These men were chasing the rush they felt in fighter bombers - but in a stylish and affordable package.

The Corvette from 1953 was the answer to these wishes and much, much more. Initially just a throw-away concept for the Motorama events, such was the demand that Chevy had no choice but to produce the car for sale.

But those shapes could never be made in steel! And never made in time to get the car to eager buyers. So a stop-gap solution was born to make the panels out of fiberglass over a ladder frame chassis. Little did the fabricators know, this template would underpin America’s sports car for the next 75 years or more.

The Chevrolet Corvette C1 is a very special automobile. Collected here are three incredible examples of this ground-breaking achievement for affordable dream cars ever since.

Click past the jump for this debrief of the 1953-1962 Chevrolet Corvette C1.

We can only imagine how long of a wait it is when you pay more than $1 million without your purchase being delivered to you for few months.

Back in January, NASCAR team owner Rick Hendrick paid $1.1 million at a Barrett-Jackson auction for the very first 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray (see a video of the auction above). That was back in January and now, we’re a week away from saying goodbye to September.

The almost 10 months it took for Hendrick to finally see his million-dollar purchase came to an end when he was finally handed the keys to the first production Corvette Stingray C7 late last week.

Talk about finally seeing a return of your investment. We’re happy to see Hendrick finally have his Corvette Stingray, even if it took a long time to come. At least he can finally sleep easy at night knowing that his $1.1 million sports car is now sitting in his garage.

All that’s left for the NASCAR team owner is to wait for the first production Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Convertible that he also won via auction last April. The price he paid for that one? $1 million.

There’s no confirmed delivery date yet for the first production Corvette Stingray Convertible, but chances are, the keys won’t be in Hendricks’ hands at least until the end of the year.

Click past the jump to read about the 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Convertible

Source: Automobile
Posted on by Simona  

The folks over at Edmunds.com laid out another awesome competition, albeit a strange one: they put the new Corvette Stingray against the 2013 BMW M3 Lime Rock Edition . Though the two would likely never really be considered competitors, Edmunds.com wanted to see which of the two was the best. Can you make a wild guess and let us know what car do you think was the best? It’s not too hard...

The two cars were compared in their 0-to-60 mph and quarter-mile times, braking distances, slalom runs and skip pad ratings. We know both cars have their respective fans, and we are pretty sure that both the M3 and the Stingray are great rides, but there can be just one winner.

As a reminder, the new Stingray is powered by a 6.2-liter, small-block V-8 engine that delivers a total of 460 horsepower, and it has a claimed 0-to-60 mph sprint of under four seconds. On the other hand, the M3 Lime Rock Edition gets a V-8 engine with an output of 414 horsepower and goes from 0 to 60 mph in 4.8 seconds.


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