Chevrolet Corvette

Chevrolet Corvette

  After six long and beautiful generations, the Chevrolet Corvette is just as much a hot commodity as it was in 1953 when the first concept was rolled out for all to see. This American-made sports car comes in four different trims: Standard, Grand Sport, Z06, and ZR1. The standard Corvette and the Grand Sport are both powered by a 6.2L V8 engine that pumps out 430hp and 424 lb-ft of torque. Add the upgraded exhaust system and the models get 436hp and 425 lb-ft of torque. The Grand Sport differentiates itself from the standard model with a few upgrades, Z06 styling cues, and its won gear and rear-axle ratios. The Corvette Z06 is powered by a 7.0L V8 engine producing 505hp and 470 lb-ft of torque and the newer ZR1 boasts a 6.2L supercharged V8 delivering 638hp and 604 lb-ft of torque to the table. All engines are mated to either a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic transmission.

Side-by-side comparisons are always a blast to watch, especially when it’s pitting two fantastic cars against each other like the BMW M4 and the Corvette Stingray . Though the guys at Automobile Magazine have to deal with a wet track, the evaluation is no less theatrical.

Both cars are essentially all new. The M4 not only enjoys a new name separating it from its four-door brother, but also enjoys a new turbocharged, 3.0-liter, inline six-cylinder engine cranking out 425 horsepower and 406 pound-feet of torque. The `Vette, of course, is completely new from the ground up. Its classification as a truly world-class sports car comes thanks in part to its Magnetic Ride Control, seven-speed manual transmission, and 6.2-liter V-8 that makes 460 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque in its highest form.

Both Christopher Nelson and Jake Holmes argue their points for each of their cars. Nelson, piloting the M4, argues that BMW didn’t have much work to do in order to make the new M4 a better car; that the previous car set the benchmark and the new one simply carries the baton but with a better engine. Holmes however, talks about how far the Corvette has come since its last generation and that it’s “fully fleshed out, well executed, and well rounded.”

Both drivers make strong cases for each of their cars, but in the end, Nelson’s admiration for the M4 and its well-balanced chassis caves to his lust for a more visceral machine. Check out all the action in the video above.

Callaway has been making production cars faster since the 1970s with a special focus on Corvettes . The company’s latest beast is this 2014 C7 Stingray SC627 modified with a supercharger and an innovative intercooler setup for maximum thermal efficiency. Jumping right to the good stuff, the supercharger pushes the 6.2-liter, small block V-8 to 627 horsepower and 610 pound-feet of torque. What’s more, those numbers are SAE certified. In comparison with the stock LT1 V-8, the SC627 Vette makes 167 more horsepower and 145 more pound-feet of torque.

Callaway does this by not only throwing a supercharger in the LT1’s vee, but also by keeping temperatures in check. The system uses three liquid-to-air intercoolers and a totally revised air intake system help keep things cool under heavy throttle. Callaway’s supercharger also extends past the hood, allowing for generous airflow over its top. Not to mention its size wouldn’t fit under the stock C7 hood.

The 2.3-liter supercharger has a high helix angle in a four-lobe rotor pack for compressing incoming air. A new long-runner manifold helps increase the LT1’s mid-range torque. This helps the engine make an impressive 500 pound-feet of toque at only 2,200 rpm. Its full torque peak of 610 pound-feet happens at 4,400 rpm, well within the engine’s usable rev range. For the full 627 ponies, the LT1 needs to rev to 6,400 rpm. If you’re keeping score, that’s only 23 horsepower and 40 pound-feet less than the upcoming Corvette Z06 .

Performance comes at a price, though, and the Callaway’s supercharger package starts at $22,995 – not including the cost of the stock C7 Stingray .

Click past the jump to read more about the Chevrolet Corvette SC627 By Callaway Cars.

To help continue theFourth of July celebrations here at TopSpeed, I have decided to take at look at how the American car has impacted the world. Europe is typically quoted with having the best cars, but here are some American machines that have stepped up and shown the world that we know what we are doing.

We may not have created the car, but we are responsible for the way they drive, the way they are made and we even made some major contributions to the world of performance and horsepower. Put down that hot dog for a few seconds and take a quick look back through history at America’s greatest contributions to the world of internal combustion. That cooler full of cold beverages and that box of explosives will both still be there when you get done.

Continue reading to find out America’s greatest contributions to the world of the automobile.

Yet another episode of Jay Leno’s Garage has hit the comedian’s YouTube channel and this one is all about the details. Jay and his Corvette -expert friend Mike McCluskey take a deep dive into the rare 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray that Mike painstakingly restored to factory specifications. Everything from the radiator hoses to the flat-top bolt holding the master cylinder’s lid on tight are talked about.

As it turns out, the 21,000 1963 Sting Rays made were nearly hand-built and each car can almost be considered a concept car . The 1963’s parts differed so greatly from the previous generation that the designers and engineers essentially designed it as they went. Then in 1964, the car’s assembly process was smoothed out, making them easier to build. The ‘63’s hubcaps, for example, are comprised of 17 separate pieces rather than the single stamping piece used from ’64 on.

Besides the 1963’s rarity, especially for its one-year-only split-window design, the car also helped mark the beginning of fuel injection in American cars. Until that time, only a select few European cars came equipped with such a fuel delivery device. Jay’s particular Sting Ray is powered by a 327-cubic-inch small-block making 360 horsepower. That’s an output rating well beyond what other performance cars of the era were making.

Though it’s 22 minutes long, the video holds your attention with facts and interesting tid-bits that only make the C2 Sting Ray that much more special to today’s car culture.

Happy Thursday, welcome back to the TopSpeed Podcast .

This week’s show includes talks about Justin’s time with the BMW 435i , Mark’s experience with the Toyota Avalon , and I talk about the insanity that was the American leg of the Gumball 3000 .

We continue the supercar talk with Mark’s take on the American trio of Viper, Corvette and Z/28 , and you get to hear our thoughts on the crazy diesel powered BMW X6 M50d .

We also spend some talking about the tragic events surrounding the injury of comedian Tracy Morgan , and we talk about just what GM’s "Zora" trademark could mean for the future of Corvette.

After all that, we give our answers to your questions and no episode of the TopSpeed Podcast would be complete without Own, Drive, Burn. This week features a trio of classic muscle.

If there is something special you want to see us talk about, drop us an email at Podcast@TopSpeed.com, hit us up on Twitter @TopSpeedPodcast — we follow back – or leave us a comment below.

We want to send out an extra-special thank you to those of you who watched our shenanigans live earlier today. Have a safe weekend, and we will see you next Thursday.

There are few cars that are as important to the world stage, and the development of the American sports car than the Chevrolet Corvette . Of the thousands of people who have worked to create this iconic nameplate, arguably none have been more important than Zora Arkus-Duntov. With the news that Chevrolet has just trademarked the name “Zora,” my mind has been running away with what this may mean.

Is there going to be a special-edition Corvette? Is this going to be an entirely new model line? Is Chevrolet just trying to give me an aneurysm by making my mind run wild with anticipation?

Whatever the reason, I have compiled a collection of what I think it could mean. From the likely candidate like name protection, to the outlandish like an entirely new lineup of cars, there is lots for you to see and think about. When you get finished, make sure to hit the comments and let me know what you guys think.

Forget what they say, these are the glory days of muscle. Sure, carburetors and glass packs are out, but direct fuel injection, variable-flow exhaust pipes, and computers have revolutionized the way modern street and track fighters do battle. We’ve pitted three of the most purpose-built machines together to see not only which car would win on the track, but which car would be the easiest to live with on a daily basis.

The competitors all hail from the U.S. of A. and sport snarling engines making huge amounts of power, all sent to the rear wheels though a manual transmission. They’re brash and unapologetic, unforgivably fast, and diabolically cool. Though they’ve all got the performance creds, do they have what it takes to impress the missus enough for a purchase to occur?

Our three contenders are the SRT (now back to Dodge) Viper, the Chevrolet Corvette , and the Chevrolet Camaro Z/28.

In order for this to be a fair fight, we’ve got to price these cars correctly. Starting with the Viper, its base MSRP is comes in at $102,485 — well over that of the Vette and Z/28 — but considering the hard time Dodge has had selling the sultry snake, there are dealer incentives to be had. According to a few price-checking websites, a 2014 base Viper can be had in the mid $90,000 range.

The Camaro Z/28, on the other hand, starts out at $73,300 — but that’s bare-bones stock without air conditioning. Another $1,150 makes the car livable in the summertime. Its total cost comes to $76,150 after destination and the gas-guzzler tax.

The Vette represents the bargain of the bunch, coming in at $70,985 in its top-line, 3LT trim fitted with the Z51 Performance Package, Magnetic Ride, Performance exhaust, and Competition Sport seats. It may be the highest equipped here, but will its least-powerful engine be able to keep up?

Click past the jump to find out.

It’s been less than a year since the redesigned C7 Corvette reached its first customers, and the latest iteration of the sports car is already available in a couple of special-edition trims. The extremely cool, 650-horsepower Z06 is already on its way and the new-generation Corvette is shaping up pretty nicely for the 2015 model year.

But expect more to follow, even if Corvette chief engineer Tadge Juechter hinted that a new-generation ZR1 is not very likely. With that out of the way, we might be looking at new special-edition models as early as 2016, maybe even a Grand Sport revival. It’s a long shot right now, but we have reason to believe Chevy is pondering a back-to-the-roots "Zora" Edition to celebrate famed engineer Zora Arkus-Duntov.

What makes us think about a tribute car to the man known as the "Father of the Corvette" is a trademark request for the "Zora" name General Motors filed with the United States Patent Trademark Office. The application is currently filed under the category of "Vehicles and Products for locomotion by land, air of water" and strongly suggests its automotive-related purpose. And since Arkus-Duntov’s career is strongly related to dropping Chevy’s legendary small-block V-8 into the second-generation Corvette , we can’t think of anything else but a special edition C7 Vette with a "Zora" badge on its fenders.

Click past the jump to learn more about what this trademark could mean.

The Corvette hit showrooms in 1953 with a 150-cubic-inch six-pot under its hood and a 10-plus-second 0-to-60-mph time. It was no speed demon, but it was the foundation that the greatness that is the Corvette was build upon. The C1 Corvette was also the last time we saw a production model without pop-up headlights before the C6 generation debuted in 2005. In 2014, the C7 and its wild, European styling hit the market, giving Ferrari and other premium brands a reason to check out what’s going on in America. Following that up was the Z06 in 2015 that made all the Euro supercars stand up and take notice.

With the new 2014 Corvette Stingray already in showrooms, we all knew that we were going to soon see a more powerful version. And now that has become a reality, as Chevrolet revealed the potent 2015 Corvette Z06 at the 2014 Detroit Auto Show.

The Corvette Z06 will keep enthusiasts happy until the the new ZR1 model hits the market, if it ever finds its way onto the market.

Just like the previous Z06 , the 2015 model, will be offered with a more aggressive exterior look, a more powerful engine, sport suspension and a new, high-performance brake system. General Motors is also offering an optional Z07 kit that will transform the new Corvette Z06 will deliver unprecedented levels of aerodynamic downforce - in fact the best in any GM model ever.

Updated 06/06/2014: Chevrolet officially confirmed today that the 2015 Corvette Z06 is rated at 650 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque - which represents a 29 percent increase on the output level and 40 percent more torque. Also, the company confirmed that the Z06 goes on sale in the fourth quarter of 2014. Full details on the engine after the jump.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06.

Only two years after the release of the C7 Corvette Stingray, Mark Reuss, GM’s global product chief, says the automaker is already working on the next generation of Corvette, though deeper details are nearly non-existent.

The news comes at the tail end of a Detroit Free Press report regarding the growing positive corporate morale within the company’s ranks. Despite all the bad press surrounding General Motors’ ignition switch recall fiasco, CEO change-up, and continually growing list of non-related vehicle recalls, Reuss says morale is higher than it was in 2012, when GM employees were last surveyed. He attributes the growth to a greater emphasis on transparency within the company as a result of the recent recalls.

Besides the news of happy employees, fans of GM’s high-performance halo car can widen their smiles as well. The next generation of Corvette is already on the drawing board. This means The General may shorten the lifespan of the C7 Vette, keeping the iconic Corvette nameplate fresh and competitive in the world’s arena. Unlike the C6 Corvette, which grew stale after an eight-year production run, the C7 may find itself replaced sooner. With competitors like Ferrari generally on a tighter and shorter shelf life, GM would be wise to adopt such a strategy.

Vehicle development these days is a long and exhausting process with years of design work done before the first prototypes are constructed. Considering that, the C7 will definitely enjoy several more years as the latest Vette, but we’d suspect GM will introduce its replacement by 2020, six years after the C7’s 2014 introduction.

Click past the jump to read more about the current Chevrolet Corvette Stingray.


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