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2014 Chevrolet COPO Camaro


In what has become somewhat of a tradition for Chevrolet at SEMA , the Bowtie-bearing brand is preparing to introduce a new version of its drag-racing mastodon, the COPO Camaro.

At the 2013 SEMA Auto Show, the COPO program returns with all the design tweaks and modifications given to the 2014 Camaro. This time, the factory-built dragster will immediately hit production with the same 69-unit allocation, making it another must-have Camaro for enthusiasts and drag racers alike.

The 2014 COPO Camaro will also come with a pair of new racing engines, including a revised take on the naturally aspirated 427 engine, as well as a supercharged version of the 350-cubic-inch engine that we first saw tucked comfortably under the hood of the 2013 COPO Camaro. The latter will also receive a 2.9-liter Whipple, screw-type compressor, as if all the mechanical workings done on the engine aren’t enough on their own.

Naturally aspirated 350- and 396-cubic-inch engines are also set to be offered for the 2014 COPO Camaro, giving buyers plenty of options to choose from as far as their preferred engine choice is going to be for their Camaro drag racer.

All 2014 COPO Camaros come standard with an NHRA-approved roll cage and suspension, and feature an exclusive live rear axle.

In somewhat of another similar move, or possibly to drive up the car’s PR-worthiness — as if it needed any — Chevrolet will send the first production COPO Camaro to Barret-Jackson this coming January for the Scottsdale, Arizona Auction. The proceeds from the auction will be sent directly to the Achilles Freedom Team of Wounded Veterans.

There’s plenty to love about the 2014 COPO Camaro. We’re sure that a lot of people share our sentiments, which is to say that those interested in scooping one up better get their finances in order before all 69 models are accounted for.

Click past the jump to read about the 2013 Chevrolet COPO Camaro

2013 Chevrolet COPO Camaro

Chevrolet COPO Camaro

The 69 COPO Camaro units that Chevy built in 2012 sold like hot cakes, so the company decided to expand production by another 69 units. And yes, those sold out pretty quickly, too.

For the 2013 model year, the COPO Camaro received a series of updates, like two all-new engines and a new manual transmission, plus a series of updates made to the exterior and the interior.

The 2013 COPO Camaro also came with a choice of three engines: a 350-cubic-inch engine that delivers a total of 325 horsepower, a 396-cubic-inch engine with 375 horsepower and a 427-cubic-inch engine rated at 425 horsepower.

Prices have yet to be determined for the 2014 model, but the 2013 version was priced at $86,000, $3,000 less than the 2012 model.

Press Release

COPO Camaro

Chevrolet Performance’s COPO Camaro program returns for 2014 with another limited run of factory-produced race cars and a pair of new racing engine choices. The COPO exclusives will carry the distinctive, updated styling of the 2014 Camaro lineup, including new front and rear fascias.

Each COPO Camaro race car is built by hand starting with hardware from the Oshawa, Ontario assembly plant that manufactures regular-production Camaros. Each production car is fitted with an NHRA-approved roll cage and other safety equipment, along with racing chassis and suspension components – including a unique solid rear axle system in place of a regular-production Camaro’s independent rear axle.

The new LS-based racing engines include a revised version of the naturally aspirated 427 engine and supercharged version of the 350 engine introduced in 2013. It will feature a 2.9L Whipple screw-type compressor. Naturally aspirated 350 and 396 engines are also available. The car displayed at the SEMA Show features the supercharged 350.

Serial number 1 of the limited-production 2014 run will be auctioned by Chevrolet Performance at Barrett-Jackson’s annual January event in Scottsdale, Ariz. Proceeds will benefit the Achilles Freedom Team of Wounded Veterans, an organization dedicated to helping wounded veterans participate in marathons and share their success within a supportive community and their families.



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