Chevrolet

Chevrolet cars

The Camaro Z/28 is set to pace the ‘Greatest Spectacle in Racing’ with recently retired driver Dario Franchitti at the wheel. The three-time Indy 500 winner will be leading the field May 25th, as the 98th running takes place at the famed Brickyard.

Franchitti’s career includes wins in 2007, 2010, and again in 2012, taking rank with a very select number of drivers to achieve such an outstanding IndyCar career. Though Franchitti is retired, he’s not slowing down. He now works in a driver development position with Chip Ganassi Racing, who is of course, powering their race cars with Chevrolet engines for the 2014 Indy season.

The Camaro Z/28 is unmodified for its pace car role, save for the decals affixed to the hood, doors, and rear quarter panels. That’s all well and good though. The Z/28 won’t have any issues getting to speed and holding corners with its 505-horsepower, 481-pound-foot 7.0-liter naturally aspirated V-8. The massive 305-series Pirelli PZero Trofeo R tires grip their 19-inch blacked-out wheels that mount to hubs holding huge carbon ceramic rotors squeezed by six-piston Brembo calipers up front and four-piston units out back.

While this will be Franchitti’s first time pacing the Indy 500, it’s old hat for the Camaro. It first did it in 1967 and 2014 will mark its eighth time. The Chevrolet brand, however, has led the field an impressive 24 times with various cars throughout the years. A 2014 Corvette Stingray did the honors last year .

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28.

The 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 is a hulking ball of muscle with the agility of a ballerina. It’s hard to come up with enough praises to describe one of the most powerful and best-handling Camaros in history. Somehow, though, the folks over at Motor Trend have found a way to do just that.

MT’s resident racer Randy Pobst took some time to give the 2014 Camaro Z/28 a serious shakedown and by, did he come out singing the praises of the Chevrolet and Z/28.

Comparing the Z/28 to an Italian supercar doesn’t seem fair, but the Z/28 debunks that notion. Pobst found this out himself when the Camaro posted a figure-eight time of 23.6 seconds, right on par with the Ferrari 458 Italia. Pobst was also quick to praise the vehicle’s carbon-ceramic brake system, which allowed the Z/28 to consistently stop from 60 to 0 mph in fewer than 100 feet.

Those things, coupled with the car’s obvious power output, are what makes the 2014 Camaro Z/28 such a prized thoroughbred, enough, at least, to be considered as one of the best Camaros Chevrolet has ever built.

With 505 horsepower and 481 pound-feet of torque at its disposal, the 2014 Camaro Z/28 is probably the purest Chevrolet -badged muscle car you can get nowadays. It has a naturally aspirated 7.0-liter powerplant (think 1968-1969 Baldwin and Yenko ) that will make most think that all hell is about to break loose each time the gas pedal hits the floor.

Sure, it has less power than the supercharged 2014 Camaro ZL1 , but Chevy built the LS7-engined pony with track performance in mind. Is the 2014 Z/28 the most track-capable Camaro yet? You bet! However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that the sports coupe that lapped the Nurburgring in 7:37.40 minutes can’t be had with an extra kick under the hood.

No, Chevrolet is not rolling out an update just yet. The 2014 Camaro Z/28 fell into the hands of Callaway Cars , the Connecticut-based GM specialist that that has already meddled with the 2014 Corvette Stingray , the 2014 Silverado truck and the 2014 SS sedan .

Dubbed Camaro Z/28 SC652, Callaway’s newest creation sports an Eaton TSV2300 supercharger under the hood, as well as a few other enhancements destined to increase output all the way up to 652 horsepower and 620 pound-feet of torque. Specifically, Callaway added a liquid-to-air intercooler, a high-flow intake system and, as expected, a low restriction exhaust system.

The extra horses kicking inside the supercharged mill enable the SC652 to accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in 3.7 seconds, about 0.3 seconds faster than the factory Z/28. Callaway claims the muscle car can complete the quarter mile in 11.5 seconds at 114 mph, which means you will not embarrass yourself at the drag strip in one of these machines.

Click past the jump to read more about the Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 by Callaway Cars.

The most important consideration for any track-day special is not horsepower, suspension setup, brakes or tries. Ask any Formula One team, Le Mans racer or local SCCA guru; the number one consideration is cooling. If the car doesn’t stay cool, the car won’t run. You can have a million horsepower, but does no good if you are sitting in the pits waiting for your engine to cool.

General Motors understands this well, so for its new track-focused Camaro Z/28 it has taken every piece of the car to the drawing board to help improve cooling and overall performance. One of the biggest changes to the car ended up being the smallest; the Flowtie.

During wind tunnel testing, engineers noticed that the shining gold bowtie on the grille was forcing lots of air away from the radiator. Richard Quinn, one of the Powertrain Cooling Development engineers, decided to take the bowtie off and he cut out the gold insert, leaving just the chrome outline. The results spoke for themselves with a 3-cubic-meter increase in airflow every minute. The net result of that was a 2-degree temperature decrease.

The newly christened Flowtie is now standard on every Z/28. If you have ever hacked at your car with a grinder, you are now justified.

If that wasn’t enough proof that Chevy believes the Z/28 is a true track machine, think about this. General Motors will provide you full warranty service even if you cane your Camaro at the local track. There are essentially no other manufacturers that will cover your engine explosion in turn 6 at VIR.

It is at this point where I believe GM would “drop the mic” and walk off dramatically.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28.

I don’t know about you, but this video just blew my mind. If you haven’t watched it already — spoiler alert! — Chevrolet had issues with the new Z/28 braking and cornering so hard, it would literally spin the tires around the rims. Originally, the development team though the rotation was only occurring by a few degrees, but after marking the tire’s location on the wheel, they found it rotated nearly 360 degrees while lapping the test track.

To solve the issue, Chevrolet tried several ways of locking the tire’s bead to the wheel, including coating the inner wheels with abrasive paint. Nothing stopped the problem, so the team took a media blaster to the inside of the wheel. The tiny grains of sand ate away at the smooth surface and created a slightly pitted, coarse surface for the Pirelli P Zero Trofeo R tires to grip. It’s an ingenious solution to a hidden problem that negatively affects lap times and braking performance.

When the top-dog Camaro Z/28 hits dealers this spring, it will arrive with 505 horsepower and 481 pound-feet of torque coming from its naturally-aspirated 7.0-liter, LS7 V-8. Through the Camaro ZL1 makes more power at 580 horses and 556 pound-feet, the Z/28 is a faster track car, thanks in large part to its reduction in weight. Heavy use of carbon fiber and lightweight glass, along with a lack of many creature comforts, the Z/28 drops some 300 pounds from the ZL1’s curb weight.

Video and more about the Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 after the jump.

Chevrolet Camaro SS

Note: Current Chevrolet Camaro pictured here.

It might be early, but we’re hearing the first rumblings about a refreshed Chevrolet Camaro set for showrooms in the 2016 model. The reports say the Camaro is destined for an evolutionary update verses an entirely new theme. What will be all new, however, is the Alpha platform underpinning the car.

The Camaro will be sharing that platform with the Cadillac ATS and the recently reworked CTS sedans. Still rear-wheel-drive, the updated platform will allow Chevy to better compete with the independent rear suspension setup underpinning the new 2015 Ford Mustang .

But The General can’t mess too much with success. The current Camaro is already selling like hotcakes to the tune of 80,600 units last year, besting the current-gen Mustang’s 77,200 sales figure and blasting the Dodge Challenger ’s 51,500 units sold. That’s why Chevy’s prodigious performance recipe needs to remain familiar.

"The difference between the existing and redesigned (Camaro) is not drastically different,” an industry insider who’s seen the new car told Edmunds. “It looks like a worked-over current-model Camaro. It is on a different platform, so that is a significant difference, but when they modified it to be on a different platform, the styling did not change that much."

We still expect to see obvious changes to the Camaro’s existing design, both inside and out. Perhaps Chevy will pour money into the cabin in an effort to surpass the new Mustang’s rather luxurious appointments. What’s more, Chevy may decide to offer a forced-induction four-cylinder in response to the Mustang’s 2.3-liter EcoBoost engine. Seems convenient the ATS has a 2.0-liter turbo I-4 mill it could loan out.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2016 Chevrolet Camaro.

Source: Edmunds
Chevrolet Corvette Z06

Get those checkbooks ready because the first production 2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 is headed to Barrett Jackson. For everyone who was pining for the return of the Corvette Z06, your wish was granted when Chevrolet officially unveiled the sports car it hailed as the "most track-capable Corvette ever, designed to deliver supercar levels of performance through unique powertrain, chassis and aerodynamic features".

But if you’re interested in new Corvette Z06, you’re going to need to pony up a significant amour of money because the first production Corvette Z06 — yep, the one with VIN 001 — is headed to the Barrett Jackson auction in Palm Beach, Florida from April 11th through the 13th.

This isn’t the first time that Chevrolet has sent first production models to the auction block, including the first production 2014 Corvette Stingray , which NASCAR team owner and Corvette collector Richard Hendrick scooped up for $1 million.

Not to discourage anybody who doesn’t have that kind of budget, but that’s just the market these days for these first production Corvettes. And with this one being the long-awaited Z06, there’s a good chance that $1 million turns out to be a conservative estimate.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Corvette Z06.

The day has finally come when Chevrolet is building flying cars. Maybe not quite like George Jetson’s ride, but at least in our eyes, it’s far more exciting. Engineers developing the 2014 Camaro Z/28 programmed in a “flying car” mode into the car’s Performance Traction Management system to compensate for the sudden loss of traction if the car goes airborne over a cresting hill like those found along the 12.9 miles of undulating tarmac at the infamous Nürburgring.

Rather than letting the PTM cut torque to the rear wheels due to a decrease in traction like it normally would, the Z/28’s driver can engage “fly car logic.” The system works by using the ride-height sensors to detect when the suspension is fully decompressed and the tires are no longer in contact with the pavement. When that scenario occurs, the PTM is temporarily disengaged allowing full torque to continue to the wheels. Milliseconds after landing, the system returns to normal and continues to manage the 7.0-liter V-8’s 505 horsepower and 481 pound-feet of torque.

Chevy says “flying car logic” gives the Z/28 up to a five-second advantage on the car’s overall lap time around the ‘Ring, which is currently recorded at 7 minutes, 37 seconds.

“Flying car logic” is available in all five PTM modes, but is said to be most effective in Mode 5, the most hard-core track setting. Even without GM’s Magnetic Ride Control, the Z/28 easily outruns the Porsche 911 Carrera S and Lamborghini Murcielago LP640 around the Nürburgring. It also outguns its Camaro ZL1 cousin by a four-second margin.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28.

Jay Leno may have cast from from show business for a second time, but he certainly hasn’t given up his passion for cars. In his latest episode of Jay Leno’s Garage, he features his own 1966 Chevrolet Corvair Yenko Stinger while he interviews its previous owner who completely restored the car to its previous glory.

The story behind the Yenko Corvair is quite an interesting one. Don Yenko — the legendary aftermarket performance builder and who Leno equates to Chevy ’s version of Carol Shelby — specially ordered 100 Corvairs from General Motors. Yenko set out to create a road racer from the rear-engine car. The Corvairs were modified with optional equipment categorized in stages one through four.

Jay’s Stage II Stinger produces 190 horsepower — up from 110 horses produced by the standard Corvair’s engine. That power comes from a rear-mounted, quad-carbureted, 164-cubic-inch (2.6-liter) flat-six mated to a manual transmission that spins the rear wheels. Speaking of wheels, Jay’s Corvair rolls on 15-inch steel rims verses the original 13-inch “wheelbarrow” wheels. The only other modification done after Yenko’s work was an aftermarket air breather added to the engine to keep oil from spewing from the crank vent.

On the road, the Yenko handles well. Its non-power steering and non-power brakes make for an authentic experience, although stopping requires a heavy foot. The flat six’s exhaust note is certainly different from the average 1960’s-era American muscle car .

When you’re browsing through the Chevrolet lineup for a high-performance vehicle, the SS is likely to get overlooked in favor of the Corvette , the Camaro , and maybe even the Sonic RS .

While those models deserve to be mentioned (the Sonic RS to a lesser extent), the hidden performance jewel of the Chevy lineup is the car with the shortest name: the SS .

The Smoking Tire took a Chevrolet SS for a test drive and you immediately know that the SS impressed the heck out of them. It’s not so much that the car itself used to be just a trim level instead of an actual model, or that Chevrolet doesn’t go out of its way to promote the same way it does the more popular models.

The true characteristic of the SS is its performance, it being given a massive 6.2-liter V-8 that produces an impressive 415 horsepower and 415 pound-feet of torque, good enough to hit 60 mph in under five seconds to go with a top speed of around 165 mph.

It’s not going to be as eye-catching as the Corvette or as angry and loud as the Camaro, but for all its worth, the Chevrolet SS gives you a sedan that hits all the right spots, even if it means doing so in the shadows.


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