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  Classic Cars news and reviews.

The 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 is undoubtedly an awesome track-prepped machine, the ultimate fifth-generation Camaro if you will. But to my eyes, the 2014 model is no match to the original Z/28 , especially if we’re talking about a Trans Am-spec race car .

Chevy introduced the Z/28 option for the 1967 model year, promoting it as a "virtually race-ready" Camaro available at any U.S. dealer. Fitted with a 4.9-liter, small-block V-8 specifically designed to race in the Trans Am series, the Z/28 became a huge success by 1969, when it accounted for nearly 22 percent of total Camaro production of the year.

The Z/28 was off to a slow start in Trans Am, losing the 1967 championship to Ford and Mercury . However, the bowtie-badged muscle car went on to dominate the competition in both 1968 and 1969 with Mark Donohue behind the wheel. In two years, the Camaro Z/28 won 21 of 25 events, crushing Detroit rivals from Ford and its Mustang . The streak ended once the second-gen Camaro was introduced in 1970 and it took Chevy five more years to win another championship, this time with the Corvette .

Although the Camaro returned to the spotlight with seven Trans Am titles in the 1980s and 1990s, none of these vehicles managed to reach the fame of the first-gen Z/28s. Not at all surprising considering the stardom the first-gen Camaro so rightfully enjoys. There’s more than that, of course. The looks, the sound, and all the amazing things surrounding late 1960s racing. Most of us aren’t lucky enough to climb into one of those Trans Am beasts, but Motor Trend’s Jess Lang managed to hoon a 1969 Camaro Z/28 around the Laguna Seca . Hit the play button to find out why the first-gen Z/28 is one of the most enticing muscle cars ever built.

A 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO has become the most expensive car sold at auction after changing owners for a whopping $38,115,000 at Bonhams’ Quail Lodge Auction in Carmel, California. The classic Prancing Horse surpassed the auction record set by a 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196R Formula One race car that sold for $30 million at the 2013 Goodwood Festival of Speed Auction.

Only 39 of these Ferraris were built in the 1960s, with many of them fetching millions of dollars during either public auctions or private sales. One example that was owned by Stirling Moss changed hands for $35 million in 2012, while another 250 GTO sold for $52 million in 2013. Both were sold privately.

Powered by a 3.0-liter, V-12 engine, the 250 GTO shown above — chassis and engine number 3851GT — was driven to a second-place overall finish in the 1962 Tour de France by Jo Schlesser and Henry Oreiller. More a maintained car than a restored one, the 3851GT has been active all its 54-year-long life, being raced in many classic motorsport events. It’s one of the most often raced 250 GTOs and it has been in a single family ownership for the past 49 years. This pretty much explains the huge price tag, doesn’t it?

The $38-million 250 GTO wasn’t the only Ferrari to fetch big bucks at Bonhams’ sale in California. Ten other Italian sports and race cars crossed the block for a combined total of $65.9 million. The bundle included a 1962 250 GT SWB Speciale that sold for $6.8 million, a 1953 250 Mille Miglia Berlinetta driven by Phil Hill for $7.2 million, and a 1978 312 T3 Formula One car for $2.3 million.

Click past the jump to read about the Ferrari 250 GTO

Car collecting has taken on a whole new meaning thanks to one British dentist who amassed the largest private collection in Britain with multiple warehouses stocked full of antique Jaguars , Bentleys , Austins, and Minis . However Dr. James Hull’s collection is now in the care of Jaguar Land Rover after the automaker purchased the entire fleet for an undisclosed amount.

The collection consists of 543 classic cars dating back to the 1930s and is estimated to be worth some £100 million, or roughly $168,346,500 U.S. dollars as of August 7, 2014. Among the collection are cars like Sir Winston Churchill’s Austin, Lord Mountbatten’s Mini Traveller , and even Sir Elton John’s Bentley.

Besides the sheer number of vehicles, the collection’s breath of variety is also intriguing. It ranges from million-dollar Jaguars down to the must humble Morris Minors, a plane-Jane economy car produced from the 1940s through 1970s.

Included are even pristine examples of a super-rare 1950s-era Jaguar XKSS and a D-Type worth more than $6.7 million together. Hull’s vehicles even include classic pedal cars dating back to the 1920s to present day. Perhaps the most special one is a Ferrari example that was hand-built in Maranello, Italy in the 1950s.

It’s unclear what Jaguar Land Rover plans to do with the massive collection, but it’s a sure bet that all 543 cars are in good hands. Perhaps those vehicles not wearing a Jaguar badge will end up at auction, possibly fetching a profit for the British automaker. Be sure to check out the video below the jump.

Click past the jump to learn more about this private collection.

Source: DailyMail

Back in 1989, Land Rover mounted an expedition to trek across the toughest lands the United States had to offer: the expansive Great Divide. The geological entity stretched from Colorado down to New Mexico and hosted numerous old mining towns established in the 1860s. Land Rover used the Great Divide Expedition to launch the then-new 1990 Range Rover. The SUVs used for the expedition were completely stock, save for more aggressive tires, bumper-mounted winches, and roof racks. Over 12 days the expedition moved south through the Great Divide while conquering unpaved or non-road surfaces during more than 75 percent of the distance.

Fast forward to 2014 and Land Rover is celebrating the 25th anniversary of the original Great Divide Expedition with a second running. The expedition will use 2014 Range Rovers to relive the experience. What’s more, Land Rover has teamed up with Tread Lightly!, the original sponsor of the first expedition, to recreate a 1990 Range Rover expedition vehicle from a restored Rover.

That restored replica is now up for auction on Ebay Motors. As of 8/5/2014, the bid is sitting at $30,001. The proceeds of the charity auction will benefit Tread Lightly!’s programs designed to protect and enhance outdoor recreation areas across the country. The auction went live starting August 4, 2014 and runs through 9 p.m. August 14, 2014.

We’ve got a full run-down of the one-off 1990 Range Rover Great Divide Expedition replica vehicle up for sale.

Click past the jump to read more about the Range Rover Great Divide Expedition Replica.

Someone’s being a little sneaky with a certain 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO that one Ferrari expert has called out as a replica. You might remember that 250 GTO that popped up on Mobile.de a few weeks ago and came with a price tag of $64 million . The car received worldwide coverage because 1), it’s a Ferrari 250 GTO and 2), it costs $64 freakin’ million!

But Marcel Massini, regarded as the world’s leading Ferrari historian, is calling BS on the $64-million 250 GTO. "It’s a replica," Massini told. "I can tell you that with 100 percent certainty. I know where all of these cars are today. And this is not one of the original GTOs."

That part about knowing where all 39 250 GTOs are is apparently what separates Massini from the other Ferrari experts out there. Not only does he know where each one is, but he has photos and detailed histories of them. All 39 of them.

Massini also pointed out the car’s rather astronomical price tag as an indication that it’s fake, saying that anybody who owns a 250 GTO will use different methods to sell a car that’s expensive and incredibly rare. In short, posting it on a website isn’t one of them.

I personally have had no business dealings with Mobile.de so its hard to tell if they themselves were duped into selling a replica. The site has yet to issue any comments on Massini’s allegations, but it’s hard to go against someone who most agree is the authority on Ferrari’s history.

Updated 05/08/2014 @ 12:00 p.m.: Apparently the Ferrari expert was right, as the ad has been removed from mobile.de.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GTO.

Source: CNBC

Long before the 918 Spyder came to take over as Porsche’s range-topping supercar , the Stuttgart-based automaker had the Carrera GT . But the roadster built between 2004 and 2007 wasn’t the first road-legal supercar offered by the German automaker. The saga began as early as 1986, when the Porsche 959 was introduced.

Born as a Group B rally car in an era dominated by monstrous WRC machines, the 959 developed into a production car when FIA’s homologation regulations required at least 200 street-legat units to be built for a rally car to become a contender in the sport. Although it shared many of its internals and the rear-engine configuration with the 911, the 959 was offered with standard four-wheel-drive, becoming the first Porsche to carry such a configuration. Later on, Porsche used the technology to build its first all-wheel-drive 911.

Hailed as the most technologically advanced vehicle of the 1980s, the 959 boasts impressive performance figures. The range-topping 959 Sport model needs only 3.7 seconds to sprint from 0 to 62 mph and just 13 seconds to accelerate from naught to 124 mph. Its quarter-mile time stands at 11.9 seconds and reaches a top speed of 209 mph.

Although short-lived, the 959’s racing career was equally successful. A rally version went on to win the Paris-Dakar Rally in 1986, while a Le Mans-spec variant finished first in its class and seventh overall at the 24-hour event the same year. Sadly, the 959 never got to compete in the World Rally Championship, as the Group B class was abolished at the end of the 1986 season. Nevertheless, the 959 earned its place among the world’s greatest supercars and in the hearts of petrol-blooded enthusiasts, myself included.

Paying tribute to the 959 never gets old, which is why various publications and online magazines keep rolling out extensive articles and videos on the German masterpiece. The folks over at XCAR are the latest to join the ranks of those who worship the 959 by putting together the review-like, 10-minute video above.

While Ferrari needs no introduction, Brabham is a name some of you might not remember so well. Founded by Jack Brabham, who died earlier this year aged 88, and Ron Tauranac, Brabham spend three decades in Formula One , in which it won four drivers’ championships and two constructors’ titles. Its first successful campaigns, and the only ones to bring both the drivers’ and constructors’ championship, came in 1966 and 1967. Although it won two more drivers’ titles, Brabham failed to win the constructors’ championship for the third time. However, the Brits came close on many occasions. 1970 was an important year for Brabham. Although it only managed fourth position at the end of the season, the team lost its number one driver, Jack Brabham. The man that drove the race cars built by his own hands retired from racing following the Mexican Grand Prix. The 1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33 was the last F1 car he had driven during an official event, making it that much more important to the company, second to only the Repco-powered single-seaters that brought the 1966 and 1967 championships.

In this car, Brabham won one race and scored three more podiums, while teammate Rolf Stommelen added a further third-place finish. Brabham, one of eight teams to use Ford’s DFV engine that year, ended the season behind Lotus, Ferrari and March, but ahead of McLaren , BRM and Matra. What made the BT33 such a competitive racer? Read on to find out.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33.

Source: Bonhams

There are only so many superlatives you can throw in the direction of the Ferrari 250 GTO . To this day, it’s still considered as the quintessential Ferrari . More importantly, the 250 GTO is also revered as one of the greatest cars of all time. The 250 GTO is treated with such high reverence that the car usually fetches millions on the auction block. We’ve seen a 250 GTO LWB California Spider Competizione fetch $11 million. Before that, a 250 LM scooped up $14.3 million. And before we forget, a pair of 250 GTOs have been sold for $32 million and $52 million, respectively. Here’s the takeaway: if you own a Ferrari 250 GTO, you’re in possession of a car that can net you at least $30 million. There is no shortage of people willing to spend that amount, maybe even double that, to own a piece of Ferrari history. That being said, a 1962 250 GTO has found itself on Mobile.de, considered as Germany’s biggest online marketplace. It’s a legitimate site that has seen its share of million-dollar transactions so there’s little reason to suggest that this isn’t an authentic 250 GTO.

Its seller, GT Golden Tower Real Estate and Luxury Gmbh, indicates that this red 250 GTO has traveled 15,000 kilometers (9,320 miles), which means that its owner has made relatively good use of it. But the car still looks to be in great shape. One photo even shows the car’s V-12 engine to be in immaculate shape. The interior also looks polished and show quality.

Everything about this 1962 250 GTO looks to be in order. Well, almost everything. See, GT Golden Tower thinks this 250 GTO can sell for €47.6 million, which is about $64 million based on current exchange rates on 7/29/2014.

That’s a lot of money, but as history has shown, it’s not an absurd figure for a Ferrari 250 GTO.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GTO.

Source: Mobile

In 1962, Ferrari made a huge leap forward by releasing the 250 GTO ; a GT car produced for homologation into FIA’s Group 3 Grand Touring Car class. The 250 GTO went on to win the over 2.0-liter class of the International Championship for GT Manufacturers for three straight years from 1962 through 1964, becoming one of the last front-engined racers to remain competitive at the top level of sports car racing. As the two-seater berlinetta retired, Ferrari built the 275 GTB/C Speciale, a lighter sports car based on the already-iconic 250 GTO.

Designed by Sergio Scaglietti, the same man that penned the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB/C got a 3.3-liter, V-12 engine under its hood, as opposed to the 3.0-liter plant fitted in its predecessor. Output was increased to 320 horsepower, which, coupled with the lowered weight, promised to deliver outstanding performance on the track. Unfortunately, Ferrari failed to homologate the 275 for the GT class, as the car submitted was considerably lighter than the dry weight stated for the road-going version.

Ferrari and FIA would reach a compromise by June 1965, enabling only one of the three 275 GTB/Cs built to compete for the remainder of the season. Although its career didn’t span for more than a few months, the Speciale proved its potency at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, where it finished third and scored the best finish by a front-engined car. Its record still stands to this day. Granted, the 275 GTB/C is not as successful as the 250 GTO or the 250 LM, however, its limited production run and bespoke character places it among the most desirable Ferrari race cars ever built.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti.

Source: RM Aucions

With Ford celebrating the Mustang’s 50th anniversary this year, it seems only appropriate to take a gander at a vintage model that enjoys both an iconic status and a resale value that’s far and above its original MSRP back in 1968.

While the Mustang was available with several engine options, the one to lust after was the 428-cubic-inch, Police Interceptor V-8 found in the GT500. It spat out roughly 420 horsepower and nearly 450 pound-feet of torque. Mated to a three-speed automatic, the GT500 could lay down 0-to-60-mph times around six seconds on its way to a quarter mile in just over 14 seconds — pretty respectable numbers for that era.

All that extra grunt came courtesy of the legendary Mustang man, Carol Shelby and his affiliation with Ford Motor Company. The extra tuning and Shelby’s name makes examples of his work very valuable these days. As of this writing, the particular example seen above is up for sale at RK Motors for a cool $149,900. With all the right paperwork and certified documentation, this car is the real deal.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1968 Ford Shelby Mustang GT500.


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