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  Classic Cars news and reviews.

The relative success of the first-generation Supra left Toyota with a huge task on its hands. It wasn’t enough to just build on the popularity of the sports car ; the company had to exceed it with the new version. So in a lot of ways, the second-generation Supra was created to make sure that it wasn’t a flash-in-the-pan model.

The model ran from 1982 to 1986 and in that time, the Supra evolved and underwent a handful of changes, resulting in the model that cemented the Supra’s place in history as one of Toyota’s finest sports cars .

In the North American market, the second generation Supra, which was still known as the Celica XX in Japan, came in two different versions: Performance Type (P-Type) and Luxury Type (L-Type). Both versions were roughly identical to each other, except for some noticeable changes to the aesthetics and the available technology contained in the models.

The success of the second-generation Toyota Supra turned a lot of people into fans of the sports car, elevating its stature in the eyes of many as one of the best sports cars of its time. It even caught the attention of Motor Trend and Car and Driver, two magazines that awarded the Supra with their own honors, including MT’s "Import Car of the Year" and Car and Driver’s "Top Ten Best List" in 1983 and 1984.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1982 - 1986 Toyota Supra.

Back in the the 1970’s, the Celica was fighting the good sports car fight for Toyota as rival models, particularly the Nissan 240Z , burst into the scene. But it wasn’t until the latter part of that decade when Toyota decided to ramp up its efforts in the sports car market. That’s when the Toyota Supra was born. Based on the Celica until its third incarnation, the Supra became the sports car Toyota put up against some of the best its rivals had to offer. It’s popularity grew to such great lengths that the Japanese automaker even created a new logo just for the Supra.

The Toyota Supra may no longer exist and even with reports of its revival bubbling in the surface for years now, we can always look fondly at the first-generation Supra and say "that’s where it all began."

Click past the jump to read more about the 1979 - 1981 Toyota Supra.

Posted on by Shanto  

There was a well-established manufacturer half a decade before Aston Martin known as Lagonda. With some early success, Lagonda became quite famous in its time till the consequences of World War II caused major struggle to the manufacturer. In 1947, Aston Martin took possession of Lagonda and reserved the name of limited number, ultra-luxurious sedans .

Aston Martin resurrected the hibernating Lagonda name in 1974 at London Motor Show by announcing the “Aston Martin Lagonda V8 ”, of which only seven units were made. The new model revived name received a humdrum response from the market and Aston Martin went back to drawing board with William Tomas. In 1976, Aston Martin lifted the curtains from a striking new concept model which surged the popularity of the Lagonda brand in quick succession. Its redesigned Lagonda received a wild response and orders piled in. With demands breaking through the roof and production rate limited to only one per week, Aston Martin rolled out the first production model in 1979 and three years later, the car finally got cleared for sale in USA.

To make the exceptional design possible Aston Martin’s engineer pushed the V-8 engine as far back as possible and even then more room was required to make the mechanism work. The engineers hatched a new intake system to compensate the space, which restricted the engine output. Tackling the issue, Aston Martin installed larger intake valves after mending the engine’s cylinder walls to meet the expected power delivery.

Aston Martin launched the Lagonda Series 3 in 1986 at New York Motor Show and the Series 4 was unveiled in all-new form in 1986.

Images via Flickr.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1976-1989 Aston Martin Lagonda.

Posted on by Shanto  

It all started in 1956 when wealthy American businessman Tony Parravano hired the Italian manufacturer, Maserati to develop a new V-8 for use in the chassis of the Kurtis Indy. Maserati saw the opportunity to revive the project codenamed Tipo 54 and develop its own engine for use its sport-specific chassis. The original car carrying a V-6 engine with chassis number 3501 became the test bed for the car ordered by the American.

The 450S made its first appearance at the Swedish Grand Prix’s practice session in August 1956, stunning everyone with its tremendous acceleration and top speed. The car clocked the third best timing in the practice, but the underdeveloped car could not handle the vibrations resonating from the wrong firing order of the engine’s spark plugs. Afterwards, the 450S received a new chassis at Mondena factory.

The development continued and in 1957, the new production 450S was rolled out to have its maiden race at the 1000 km of Buenos Aires where it led the Ferrari twin-cam sports car by 10 seconds. The car suffered from a failed transmission and retired from the race. However, the car went on to claim its first ever podium finish in the 1957 Swedish GP. Sadly, FIA changed the rules next year, making 450S ineligible for the Grand Prix.

The car was quickly prepared for the 1956 Mille Miglia 1,000-mile race. Legendary driver Stirling Moss, along with Denis Jenkinson as navigator, experienced a brake failure and the car came to rest against a tree. Driver and co-driver walked away without a scratch, but the car had to return to the factory for repairs and further development.

Fantuazzi then came into picture when he designed a new body with a contoured design. The car also got a longer wheelbase to accommodate the new V-8 engine. The updated vehicle was tested in the Swedish Grand Prix in August 1956 where the car’s builders continued to tweak is new chassis and make improvements.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi.

Source: RM Aucions

Nearly two months after releasing the Alpinestars Car Pack , Turn 10 Studios has announced the introduction of a new downloadable bundle for the Forza Motorsport 5 racing game.

The new package includes ten diverse vehicles that will take users through different automobile eras. Those who fancy vintage American cars will get to drive the 1940 Ford De Luxe Coupe, while muscle car enthusiasts will be able to hoon the gorgeous 1957 Chevy Bel Air and the power-packing Chevelle SS-396 and Dodge Dart HEMI Super Stock.

The motorsports section is also well covered, with a 1958 Aston Martin DBR1 and a 2013 BMW M3 race car included. The second Aston Martin gamers will get their hands on is the 2011 V12 Zagato , with more British heritage coming with the 1966 Ford Lotus Cortina.

Lastly, the 1986 Alfa Romeo GTV-6 will give you a taste of pure Italian performance, while the 1973 Mazda RX-3 will be the only Japanese vehicle waiting to be hooned via the game controller.

The Meguiar’s Car Pack is available for $9.99 in the Xbox Live Marketplace and at no cost to users that already own the Forza Motorsport 5 Car Pass.

Last month we told you the story of Scott Fisher and his continuing journey around the United States in his beautiful 1967 Datsun Fairlady Roadster. At that time, he had just left Nissan’s headquarters in Nashville and was striking out again along some dusty road less traveled. Well, one month, some 7,000 miles, and one nasty encounter with a deer later, the automotive and photography wizards at Petrolicious caught up with Fisher and his Fairlady. The video above is a masterfully shot peek at what the journey has held.

Fisher’s Fairlady is mostly stock with only minor modifications. A five-speed transmission was swapped in from a later year Datsun, a ticker-core radiator for better cooling, and an electronic ignition module and distributor remain his only upgrades. The 1.6-liter inline four with pushrod valves has proved its worth, having never left him stranded.

Unfortunately, Fisher’s Fairlady encountered a deer with its right front fender, hood, and headlight one late afternoon as the sun set in the distance. “I definitely want to fix the damage that my friend the deer helped me out with,” he says. “I would like to eventually do a full frame-off restoration on it.” Fisher says his next dream includes shipping the car overseas after its restoration and continuing his road trip around the islands of Japan.

Fisher has gained a sizable following on his blog at RoadsterRoadTrip.com where he documents his experiences in words, photos, and videos. Be sure to check that out, along with our previous coverage of his journey.

The video above is chock-full with history, life, humor, old cars, and towards the end, the restoration of the oldest Porsche car in existence. The short exposé follows the story of Luciano Rupolo, the grandson of an Italian immigrant who grew up enjoying perhaps the most legendary racing period, only to eventually come across an abandoned rusted hulk that resembled an early Porsche. Turns out, it was something very special.

As Luciano elaborates approximately 10 minutes into the video, he discovered the car wasting away in a repair shop. Years of pestering the shop’s owner, 250,000 Liras (roughly $180) and a scheme about grand theft auto later, the car was his.

Even more years go by before he discovered what he’d actually purchased. After an eye-opening trip to the Porsche Museum , he began researching the car. Turns out, the car wore the chassis number of 004. Since car number 003 has been registered in 1949 – one year after Luciano’s – and cars 001 and 002 are no longer in existence, that made his Porsche the oldest in existence.

He spent years attempting to restore the car back to its original condition. During that time, Wolfgang Porsche himself caught wind of Luciano’s car and offered to buy it. He refused as he felt Mr. Porsche was lowballing his offer. “You keep your money,” Luciano told him. “I keep your car.”

Fast forward to 2012 and Luciano had fallen into a difficult financial time and ended up selling the car. Even more unfortunate is the lack of knowledge of the buyer. Rumors suggest a Swiss collector now owns it – the same collector who owns car number 003.

The Barrett-Jackson Auctions are always exciting to watch. The level of perfection in the restoration jobs, or perhaps the pristine level of OEM correctness in the majority of the vehicles rolling across the auction block can be stunning. The prices these cars sell at can be quite stunning as well with some climbing into the multiple millions range. With all the money and metal trading hands every year in Scottsdale, Arizona, it’s interesting to take a deeper look at what makes cars valuable.

Sure, it can be the rarity of a particular vehicle, like say a 1957 Ferrari Testa Rossa, but it can also be a culmination of options that make a particular vehicle more valuable than another, despite being similar in quality.

That’s where this infographic steps in. By looking at all 1,397 vehicles sold at the 2014 Barrett-Jackson auction and crunching a bunch of numbers related to their generic options make-up like exterior and interior color, transmission style, and year of production, the folks at H&H Classic Parts came up with some answers.

Going strictly off the numbers of what options sold for the most, the highest average price would belong to a 1950s era Plymouth with a manual transmission, black exterior paint, and a dark interior. Conversely, a 1980s or newer Pontiac with an automatic transmission, white paint, and a light-colored interior would theoretically have brought the lowest average price.

The reality of the auction is much less ambiguous, however. The highest-priced, crazy outlier that fetched the most dough was a 1967 Chevrolet Corvette L88 Sting Ray with a red on red color scheme. The lucky winning bidder paid $3.85 million with an additional 10 percent in fees going to Barrett-Jackson. Whew!

Click past the jump for the full infographic

We cover a lot of automotive-related material here at TopSpeed. From the latest and greatest vehicles with promises of fast quarter-mile times, insane 0-to-60 sprints , and the occasional gravel-shredding off-roader , it’s all about the newest and fastest.

But sometimes, you just have to slow down and enjoy the drive — to bask in every last mile of a pure driving experience in a pure sports car . That’s exactly what one man set out to do.

Scott Fisher and his beloved 1967 Datsun Fairlady Roadster are on a meandering mission to travel the United States in a clockwise fashion, while soaking in the experience on the timeless journey. No schedules needed.

Fisher started his epic journey last spring from his home in Las Vegas after selling his manufacturing business that he ran for 16 long years. It has since taken him over 30,000 miles through the American heartland, rolling over local highways and byways, while avoiding major routes and interstates “like the plague.” And it was all done in his beautiful ’67 Fairlady.

“I knew I needed to kinda’ get out, and unwind, and get my mojo back,” the 45-year-old man says. His journey has taken him north through the Pacific Northwest and over through the flyover states. Fisher’s goal was to stay up north during the summer months to avoid the extreme heat and sun exposure. “[It’s] allowed me to keep the top down, maybe 80 percent of the time.”

Click past the jump to keep reading about Scott’s amazing travels

Posted on by Simona  

Another day, another Ferrari 250 sets a sales record. This latest record-setting Ferrari is a 250 Testa Rossa, and it changed hands for what the Daily Mail is reporting as £24,000,000 — that equates to about $39 million.

At that price, it exceeds the previous record of £22.5 million set in 2012 by a 250 GTO, and it triples the price paid for a 1957 Testa Rossa in 2009 . That 2009 sale was also a record.

What separates this Testa Rossa from its brethren to demand such a price? Pedigree, fame and its immaculate condition all came together to make this a very valuable car.

The car itself is Chassis 0704, and it is actually a prototype that was created before the limited run of “normal” 250 Testa Rossas. F1 World Champion Phil Hill helped to pilot this exact car to race wins in the in the 1,000 km (683.5-mile) Buenos Aires and 12 Hour Sebring races. It has contested many other races, including two entrances into the 24 Hours of Le Mans. That gives this particular car one of the best racing heritages of any Ferrari still in existence in the private market.

Even with such a long racing heritage, the car is completely original and unmolested. It has all the battle scars of wheel-to-wheel action, but it has very little actual damage to any of the body panels, and the interior looks incredible for a 57-year-old car.

The new owner of the car has not been released, but if you want more info and images of this incredible machine head over to the Daily Mail for the original story.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1957 Ferrari Testa Rossa.

Source: Dailymail

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