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  Classic Cars news and reviews.

Porsche continues to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the legendary 911 in some of the coolest ways imaginable.

It’s already checked the special-edition 911 Carrera off its list. Now, it’s taking a completely different approach by hosting a record-breaking parade of Porsche 911 sports cars at the Silverstone Grand Prix over the past weekend.

All in all, 1,208 classic and modern 911s attended the event, all squeezing into what eventually became a completely packed and cramped Silverstone race track. It’s hard enough to see hundreds of 911s in one location but to see well over 1,000 in one location was a completely surreal sight.

Porsche Club GB and Silverstone Classic took center stage in organizing the event and while it was initially pegged to attract hundreds of 911s to the event, not a lot of people expected to hit 1,000, let alone exactly 1,208 Porsche 911s that all trooped over to Silverstone to attend the record-breaking gathering.

If you’re a Porsche aficionado, this is like heaven on wheels. There are classic Carreras, 911 RSs, RSRs, 911 GTs, Speedsters, Targas, and 911 Turbos.

Needless to say, the expectations for the gathering were far exceeded, something Mark Porsche, the son of Porsche 911 designed founder Ferdinand Alexander ‘Butzi’ Porsche, said meant a lot to his family.

“Of course, the 911 means a great deal to me as it’s my father’s big design and it will always have a special place in my heart,” he said.

“It’s been a family member over all the generations of the 911 series and I’m very proud to be here today to represent the Porsche family at this great event. I think that to have these 1,200 cars on track is the attention that the 911 deserves for its 50th birthday. I can’t thank the Porsche Club GB enough for making this event possible.”

Click past the jump to read about the Porsche 911 Carrera 50th Anniversary Edition

Source: Porsche
Posted on by Simona  

Chris Harris has long entertained us by reviewing some of the greatest cars out there, and the latest episode of Drive is no exception. This time around, Chris stepped outside of his comfort zone of modern-day sports cars and supercars to get behind the wheel of a classic Jaguar C-Type . To take him further out of his zone, Chris is driving the classic Jag in the famous Mille Miglia event, which forces him to drive slow and calculated speeds, as opposed to full-tilt, as he is used to.

The C-Type (with "C" coming from competition) was a racing sports car built by Jaguar and sold from 1951 to 1953. There were only 55 units built and all of them raced in competitions like the Le Mans 24 hours race, which it won twice. The C-Type was driven by legendary men like the Stirling Moss and Jack Fairman, Leslie Johnson and three-time Mille Miglia winner, Clemente Biondetti.

The C-Type is powered by a DOHC in-line six-cylinder engine with two SU carburetors. This powerplant delivered a total of 210 horsepower in its heyday.

At recent auctions, the model was auctioned for an amazing price of $3.7 million.

Posted on by Simona  

Classic Recreations developed a one-of-a-kind Shelby G.T.350CR that will be auctioned at Mecum Auctions on August 16, 2013. The new G.T.350CR will feature classic Shelby elements, such as functional brake scoops, riveted quarter window covers, side exhaust and iconic LeMans stripes.

The model is based on an original 1966 Mustang fastback combined with a complete ground-up rebuild. The base V-8 engine was replaced with a new 7.0-liter V-8 engine from Ford Racing that delivers a total of 545 horsepower. The engine mates to a Tremec five-speed manual transmission.

Along with the new engine, Classic Recreations also installed new Carroll Shelby signature rally series 1000 seats, climate control, a top-shelf sound system, a dual-tank nitrous injection system, bespoke forged three-piece HRE Performance wheels, Wilwood brakes and custom paint.

A coil-over suspension and power rack-and-pinion steering handle all the corners that this hopped-up pony car encounters. The GT350CR also includes a four-wheel disc brake system with 13-inch discs up front and 12-inch discs out back combined with four-piston calipers.

After the first prototype crosses the auction block, Classic Recreations will put the G.T.350CR into production. The custom builder will produce only 10 units per year and prices start at $119,000.

Click past the jump to read more about Shelby GT350CR by Classic Recreations.

From one iconic car model to another, Mini took the rather unexpected but ultimately gracious step in wishing Porsche’s legendary 911 a happy 50th birthday.

Maybe it’s not that surprising, considering that it’s coming from Mini, a company that has made an art out of steering away from the skid. But Mini Mini isn’t just sending birthday wishes to Porsche. No, that would’ve been too easy and not up to the standards of the Mini Way.

What it did was take the time to participate in a dedicated photos shoot that brought together a classic Mini and a first-generation Porsche 911 Targa; two cars that not only defined their respective car markets, but also came to the photo shoot dressed in equal doses of lime yellow.

The move is admirable considering that both companies are owned by different German auto conglomerates (BMW for Mini and Volkswagen for Porsche). It’s also a shrewd move by the British brand that somehow always gets to promote itself when it’s not trying to.

Click past the jump to read the press release and more about the first-gen 911 Targa

Transformers 4 is still a year away from hitting theaters, but that hasn’t stopped producer Michael Bay from giving us a sneak peek at the cars that have already been penciled in to make appearances in the movie.

Yesterday, it was a redesigned Optimus truck, a Bugatti Veyron , and a Chevrolet Corvette Stingray .

Today, it’s a 1967 Chevrolet Camaro SS .

It goes without saying that this car is expected to be Bumblebee as it goes back to its Camaro roots. For one thing, it sure looks a lot better than the "piece of crap" Camaro Bumblebee started as in the first movie.

Oddly enough, the new Bumblebee is not a fifth-generation model, which might catch some people by surprise. Not us, though; if there’s anything that looks better than the current Camaro, it’s a customized classic Camaro capable of fully flexing its old school American muscle.

Click past the jump to read about the 1967 Chevrolet Camaro SS

Posted on by TB +  

The Aston Martin DB5 is a global phenomenon often referred to as ‘the most famous car in the world’ thanks to its longtime heritage over 50 years of James Bond films. The car itself retook center stage a few times in the films since originally starring in Goldfinger and From Russia With Love, most recently with Skyfall’s Daniel Craig wheeling it out of secret storage before a midnight dash to his childhood orphanage in Scotland.

RM Auctions 2012 sale of this Sierra Blue example also includes a big name attached: Sir Paul McCartney, who rewarded himself with his first Aston Martin just a few weeks after The Beatles breakout appearance on U.S. television via The Ed Sullivan Show.

As special as the DB5’s numerous celeb owners and movie credits are, the coverage can be exhausting sometimes because the same tired facts are reshuffled. In this full review of the DB5, the focus is the merits of the car itself versus its contemporaries like the E-type Jaguar , Lamborghini 350 GT and Ferrari 250 GTO.

The DB5 was also created in a fashionable convertible body-style and as a one-off shooting brake for company lead David Brown, but the two-door hardtops are the most recognizable and affordable examples of 1963’s most advanced car.

Click past the jump for the full review of this cherished dream car.

If you’ve been visiting these pages for the past couple of years, you might remember Holger Schubert . If you have a hard time recalling the man, he was the one who decided to build a state-of-the-art garage in his Los Angeles home for his beloved Ferrari 512 BBi .

That was back in 2010. Recently, the boys over at Petrolicious were able to pay a visit to Schubert’s remarkable garage and see for themselves exactly what makes this supposedly simple room such a technological wonder.

We’re not going to spoil a whole lot of the details because the video above does a remarkable job of showing you the garage in all its glory. But to give you an idea, the whole setup comes with a ten-foot-long, fifteen-foot-high bridge that has a hydraulic ramp on one end installed where the 512 BBi can go in and about its business.

And if you’re thinking this was a project everyone can partake in, Schubert actually spent $1.5 million to build the entire thing.

Click past the jump to read about the Ferrari 512 BBi

Posted on by TB +  

Ferrari had a big problem with its 400 series when it debuted in 1959. Sure, the car packed a racing V-12 and all the gravitas a Ferrari badge can bring, but its brutal style made the front-engine 2+2 GT car a tough sell in one of Ferrari’s fastest-growing markets: the United States.

An emergency refresh was undertaken. Gone was the 400’s square grille and quad headlamp setup, replaced by Ferrari’s delicious oval slatted grille and single round headlamps under glass at each corner. Suddenly, the 400 Superamerica SWB Coupé Aerodinamico was as gorgeous as its two-seat siblings.

This very car, one of 36 built, is owned by famed driving instructor Skip Barber and is set for auction this weekend on May 25th by RM Auctions in Lake Cuomo, Italy. The pre-sale estimate is between $2.4 and $3 million, but the bidding could well reach $5 million before the dust settles.

Beneath the Superamerica Aerodinamico’s sumptuous bodywork lies the vanguard of Ferrari tech at the time, much like the Ferrari 456GT and current FF . Part of the “America” series of cars that included the 330 GT and 365 GTC , the plan in Modena was to leverage the flexibility offered by their small-scale Pininfarina bodywork team to create unique shells that would sell cars in crucial markets, like New York and Los Angeles, as well as Firenzi and Roma.

Click past the jump for the full review and photo gallery of this timeless classic, the 400 Superamerica Coupe SWB Aerodinamico.

Posted on by TB +  

The recent record-breaking sale of this one-off 1960 Aston Martin DB4 GT Jet by Bertone shows the remarkable passion surrounding the brand’s classic cars, especially those with a unique or special racing history.

What’s so special about this car, aside from its rare provenance and Aston Martin Works Service restoration? Quite a few things about the DB4 GT were celebrated at the time, notably its potent top-end performance, great handling and the aircraft-style leather interior. The DB4 GT’s platform chassis replaced the DB4’s spaceframe, meaning new bodywork was required because the original Touring-designed panels weren’t compatible with the newly-developed floorplan and a chopped wheelbase.

Let’s get the money question out of the way. Yes, the Bertone Jet is more than ten times what a base DB4 is worth, but the final price was near the top end of the pre-sale estimate – so this was no surprise in the Aston community. All signs were good ahead of the sale: custom Bertone – pronounced “Bear Tony” - exterior and interior; the car’s unique nature; and the fact that it changed hands at the original chassis factory with full manufacturer blessing.

So is it a collector’s item? Without a doubt.

The current craze for the similar Ferrari 250 GT and Jaguar E-type heaves most of the dollars on convertibles – making them among the most valuable cars of all time. The 250 GT ’s auction magic is greatly enhanced by the fact that the car is a total joy to drive. Is the Bertone Jet a stunning drive as well?

Click past the jump for the full review of the DB4 GT Jet.

Posted on by Simona  

Things went pretty great for Aston Martin during this weekend: next to unveiling the CC100 Speedster , the company also obtained a record auction price for a unique DB4GT. The car was part of the Aston Martin Centenary Sale at Aston Martin Works on 18 May 2013, which totaled a record total of over £10 million (more than $15 million), with every lot sold.

The DB4GT was auctioned for an impressive amount of £3,249,500 (a little over $4.9 million) - the highest ever price paid for an Aston Martin at auction.

However, this is not a regular DB4GT: it is nicknamed "The Jet" and was the last DB4GT to be built. The model is a one-off edition and has been designed by the Italian design house Bertone. The model was unveiled at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show.

This unique DB4GT won a total of 12 awards, including first in class at Pebble Beach and the Hurlingham Club, and best in show at Villa d’Este.

Click past the jump to read more about the Aston Martin DB4GT.


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