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  Classic Cars news and reviews.

Back in the mid 1980s, the performance car world was still on its back, thanks to the uppercut that the 1970’s emission standards laid on the likes of the Camaro, Mustang, and Corvette. However, the exotic car companies, like Ferrari Ferrari and Lamborghini, and luxury car companies, like Mercedes-Benz and BMW, all had the upper hand, thanks to the deep pockets of their customers.

These deep pockets allowed these high-level car manufacturers to spend more time and money developing cars that both met the emission standards and performed awesomely. One of these monsters of the early-emission era was the 1985 Mercedes-Benz 300E Hammer ” by AMG. Much like the M3, the “Hammer” was a midsize car that was relatively tame from the factory, boasting a 177-horsepower, 5.6-liter V-8 engine. If you wanted that extra power that the “Hammer” provided, simply pony up an additional $89,120 on top of the 300E’s base price of $39,000 and Benz would build you this custom beast.

Rarely do we see one of these in the wild and even rarer is to catch a glimpse of the factory-owned model, which is claimed to produce between 381 and 396 horsepower and hit a top speed of “over 190 mph.”

Well, Chris Harris not only got to drive one, but it just so happened to be the factory-owned model. In typical Chris Harris fashion, he doesn’t just take it on a leisurely stroll either, he got this classic 80’s beast sideways on several occasions.

Check out the above video to see Chris in action.


If you have a knack for watching daytime TV, you likely know who Doctor Phil is. In fact, even if you don’t watch it, you likely know that he is the over opinionated and sometimes-controversial psychologist that hands out advice to random people on his show.

Little did we know that Dr. Phil is a car nut too, or at least he seems like one, thanks to the 1957 Bel Air convertible he owns. Unfortunately, someone obviously wanted it a little more than him, as the $100,000 drop top – yup, it’s actually worth at least that much on the high end – was the victim of a car thief at a local repair shop.

The Chevy was in the shop for repairing a no-start condition, which proves that the Doc is either too busy to fix it or knows nothing about automotive mechanics, as that should be a simple fix on this all-mechanical car. The police report states that the lock was hacked off of a garage door in the shop and the thief had a clean getaway.

The robber must have either been a mechanic and repaired the vehicle, had a tow truck, or had some help to push this large vehicle out of the shop and to its destination – likely a chop shop somewhere in the local Burbank, CA area.

The car should be relatively easy to spot, as it is a black convertible Bel Air with chrome wheels, wide-whitewall tires, gold badging, and red leather interior — similar to the one above. There is no reward listed, but we’re sure Phil would pony something up for the return of his $100K car.


About a year ago, Swiss artist Dante brought a 24-karat Ferrari 250 GTO sculpture to the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

Ever the provocateur for all things awesome and artistic, Dante has created yet another masterpiece of a sculpture. This time, the artist’s inspiration is another classic Italian supercar: the Lamborghini Miura.

Instead of Pebble Beach, Dante will be presenting his 24-karat Miura sculpture at the Abu Dhabi Formula One Grand Prix this coming November. In addition to being finished in 24-karat gold, the 1:24 scale Miura sculpture was built using silver and comes with a black marble base and a piano black lacquered presentation case.

Dante will only build 50 of these models with each piece being priced at 50,000 Swiss Francs, which is around $52,000 based on current exchange rates. For that one person who believes he can always do better than that, Dante is also offering a one-off model that will cost double - 100,000 Swiss Francs ($104,000) - than the 24-karat versions.

What’s the catch for this one-off, you ask?

It’s a solid gold sculpture of the Miura.

Captain America: The First Avenger” was chock-full of loads of action, but one thing automotive junkies couldn’t get enough of was the triple-axle car that Red Skull – the villain – drove in the movie. Though a lot of the scenes in the movie that showed the car were computer-generated, there was actually a real-life example of this beast built, and we found a video showing it in all of its glory.

The Schmidt Hydra Coupe is touted in the movie as being powered by a V-16 Supercharged engine and fueled by a power cube. In real life, however, this massive machine boasted a V-8 Ford engine pulled from a drag car. Taking its styling from the Mercedes 540K , Mercedes G4 Offroader, various Bentleys and Duesenbergs, this tank on wheels is both retro and futuristic at the same time.

It measures in at a massive 7.62 meters (25 feet), boasts six wheels, which is thanks to it being based on a truck chassis. This massive hunk of car is draped in a high-gloss red paint, matching its owner’s skull, and features massive white-wall tires.

It’s a pretty impressive build for a one-off movie car and we’re sure to see it at an auction one day. We’ll have to keep a keen eye out for it, so we can get together all of the details for you.

Until then, enjoy the above video showing us various parts of this awesomely crafted vehicle.

Source: YouTube

Automakers usually take great pride in unveiling concept cars and while most of them don’t even see the light of production, they make for interesting talking points on what kind of car they could’ve been if they were produced en masse. Very rarely do you see a concept version get sent back under the covers without being seen by the public for the next 25 years.

But that’s exactly what happened last weekend at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance when Porsche brought out what can only be described as the evolutionary concept predecessor of the Panamera , the 928 H50 Concept.

It must be noted that the 928 H50 Concept bears a striking similarity to the 928s that were produced from 1978 to 1995. The overall profile is similar, including the long, sliding hood that harkens back to the aesthetic profile of the 928. There are some awkward lines in there and the front-rear balance appears to be skewed to the former, but for all of its resemblance to the old 928, the 928 H50 Concept has one thing the other doesn’t have: two extra doors.

Continued after the jump.

In the early-1960s, Ford had gained an interest in long-distance road racing and decided it was time to invest in a car that could compete in the likes of the 24 Hours of Le Mans race. In 1963, Ford and Ferrari Ferrari struck a deal for production, but Ferrari cut the project off after they couldn’t come to an agreement as to whether Ford could participate in the Indy 500 or not.

Ford then decided if Ferrari wasn’t going to work with them, they were going to beat them. Ford negotiated with both Lotus and Lola before deciding to go with Lola, but the car was a complete mess and retired much more than it finished. After the 1964 Nassau race, Carroll Shelby stepped in to right the ship.

Between 1966 and 1969, the GT40 went on to win the Le Mans an impressive four times in a row, entrenching it in racing history and propelling Carroll Shelby Shelby even further into legendary status. Following the 1969 model year, the GT project was shut down and the GT40 production stopped at just 107 cars, ending its impressive run.

Check out our full review on the GT40 after the jump.


Just two years after the first Mercedes-Benz automobile rolled off of the lineup, the newly joined team of Mercedes and Benz dove into the emerging sports car industry. Sports cars of the 1920s were nothing like they are today, but they were just as relatively advanced as today’s sports cars are to today’s econo-boxes.

This Mercedes-Benz sports car, dubbed the 680S Saoutchik Torpedo, was a marvel of its era, as it featured a perfect mixture of styling from various classes and areas. It was not only a sports car, but a luxury car too. In addition, it was a perfect combination of German engineering and French design, having been designed by Jaques Saoutchik.

To boot, it was the fastest sports car in the world at the time, making it a deadly combination. It’s no wonder that it just won the “Best of Show” award at the 2012 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

Click past the jump to read our full review of the Mercedes 680S Saoutchik Torpedo.


The Ferrari Daytona is one of the most sought after cars in automotive history and certainly the most sought after Ferrari. There were only 1,406 models built in its six model years, making it a very exclusive car. The spyder model, which is officially dubbed the Ferrari 365 GTS/4 is ultimately the rarest of the group, seeing only 122 models from 1971 through 1973.

We are not certain how many of the 122 spyder models are still in existence today, but that number may be taken down by one after a horrible meeting between a GTS/4 and a German tree. As expected of such a meeting, the tree won, leaving the once-worth-$600,000 GTS/4 with some serious damage.

According to reports, the driver claimed that his brakes failed, causing him to slam into the tree. Fortunately, the driver was not injured and his passenger was only treated for minor injuries. More than likely, the GTS/4 will be rebuilt, but judging from the damage, it will no longer be a $600K car. Hopefully the driver had some pretty stout insurance coverage on this puppy...

Source: Jalopnik

At the Frankfurt Motor Show in 1955, BMW unveiled an all new sports car that was put in place to help continue the company’s post-war growth. The 503, as BMW dubbed it, went into production the next year and came in both a coupe and convertible model. Only 413 total 503 models were ever built and 139 of those were convertibles (cabriolet).

This makes the BMW 503 Series I Cabriolet one of the most desired BMWs of both its era and all eras, for that matter. The 503 was never an overly powerful model, but it was a well-balanced car that delivered performance and comfort at the same time – something that was lacking in the late-1950s.

With it only seeing a production run up until 1959, getting your hands on one of these gems is quite the tough task. It is not completely impossible, however, as there are a few that cross the auction block every handful of years. You can bet your bottom dollar on the fact that these rare 2+2 drop-tops fetch a rather hefty sum.

Click past the jump to read all about the 1956 through 1959 BMW 503 Series I Cabriolet.

The Lotus Elite was Lotus’s first ever GT car and was what really launched Lotus into the forefront of racing. When it debuted in 1958, no one had seen anything like it. The Elite boasted a paltry curb weight, thanks to its unit-body construction that was 100 percent fiberglass, instead of the more typical fiberglass body-on-steel frame construction.

The powerplant was manufactured for Lotus by Coventry Climax, and varied in power, depending on the Elite’s options. This 1,216 cc engine pumped out between 75 and 105 horsepower, and threw power to the rear wheels via an MG -built 4-speed early on or a 4-speed ZF trans in their later years. That may not seem like much by today’s standard, but for a 4-cylinder of the late-50s and early-60s, that was amazing. Plus its lightweight body created a weight ratio ranging from about 10 pounds per horsepower to 20 pounds per horsepower.

The Elite’s body was a thing of beauty, as it looked very quirky, but boasted a 0.29 drag coefficient, which is better than even the 2002 Acura NSX with its 0.30. Its long nose and rounded cabin just added the the car’s character, but its backside just didn’t fit in with the rest of the car.

Regardless of the super-skinny wire wheels and tires, the Elite Series II actually handled pretty well. It can attribute this to its 4-wheel independent suspension, which was unheard of at the time, with dual wishbones upfront and Chapman struts on the rear. These are similar to MacPherson struts in construction, except that they use a drive shaft and light radius rod in place of a lower control arm.

Also revolutionary for the era was its use of 4-wheel disc brakes and inboard brakes on the rear. These inboard brakes help reduce the vehicle’s unsprung weight, keeping the spring and strut movement more stable.

Click past the jump to read about the Elite Series II’s pricing.


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