classic cars

classic cars

  Classic Cars news and reviews.

British DJ and TV presenter Chris Evans (not to be confused with Captain America Chris Evans) recently dropped a staggering £2.27 million on one of the most famous Ferraris ever created, the 1971 Ferrari Daytona Spyder . Evans purchased the iconic Ferrari at Silverstone Auctions ’ Salon Prive sale in London late last week. What was initially thought of as just an appearance by the British celebrity quickly escalated into a frenzied bidding war for the extremely rare Ferrari Ferrari . In the end, Evans won the auction after agreeing to shell out £2.27 million for the Daytona Spyder, which converts to around $3.7 million as of 9/9/2014.

The amount the Daytona Spyder went for is thought to be a world record for the model, further highlighting how classic Ferraris have become incredible investments these days.

This particular Daytona Spyder also holds the unique distinction of being built by two of the most important Italian design houses: Pininfarina and Scaglietti. It also hasn’t spent a whole lot of time under the sun despite being more than 40 years old. According to Silverstone Auctions, the Daytona Spyder Evans scooped up for almost $4 million only has less than 4,000 miles on its odometer. It’s also been described as being in "concours condition," which pretty much translates into "as good as it gets."

Click past the jump to read more about the 1971 Ferrari Daytona Spyder.

Source: DailyMail

RM Auctions is one of the biggest auto auction houses in the world. It’s been home to some of the biggest auction buys in recent memory, including a 1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Scaglietti Spider that sold for $6.4 million back in 2012. For 2014, RM Auctions is set to open shop in London where a number of classic exotics will be up for bid to the highest bidder.

EVO managed to get a guided tour of RM Auctions’ storage facility where Harry Metcalfe joined the team to talk shop about some of the cars that are expected to get a lot of attention at the sale.

As expected, the facility contains some of the rarest and most beautiful metal, carbon fiber and aluminum in the world. EVO and Metcalfe zeroed in on a few of them, including a rare 1986 Ferrari Testarossa and a 1990 Lamborghini Countach . These two cars are widely considered as the "poster exotics" of the 1980s, and seeing them in the same auction is a real blast back to the decade of teased hair and leather pants for myself.

The guided tour also included short discussions about the 1993 Jaguar XJ220 , the 1959 Facel Vega HK500 Coupe , and the 1973 Alpine-Renault A110 1300 V85 .

There are many more cars that EVO and Metcalfe discuss in this 32-minute episode. I won’t run the risk of spoiling all the models, as having an authority like Metcalfe give you a little history lesson about them trumps my ramblings about them here.

There’s been a lot of talk about Ferrari’s rumored plans to introduce a V-6-powered, entry-level sports car in the near future. It may sound awkward given the company’s tradition with V-8 and V-12 powerplants, but the Italians have done this before. It happened between 1968 and 1976, when Ferrari launched the Dino marque for models powered by engines with fewer than 12 cylinders. Once called the "lesser Ferraris," the Dinos carried 2.0- and 2.4-liter, V-6 units, as well as a 3.0-liter V-8 under their rear bonnets. The most iconic Dino was the 246 GTS , but the 308 GT4 received some attention as well.

Produced for eight years — four with a Dino badge and four as a Ferrari — the 308 GT4 featured a 2+2 coupe body and a wedge design penned by Bertone. The 3.0-liter eight-banger generated 250 horsepower at launch, but the engine lost 20 ponies when it crossed the pond to America due to slight modifications. Weighing in at about 2,500 pounds, the 308 GT4 wasn’t astoundingly fast, but it was quick enough for Elvis Presley to buy one. It’s actually one of the last car he purchased nearly a year before passing away in 1977.

40 years have passed since its official launch, and the 308 GT4 is finally getting the love it deserves from Ferrari aficionados as the company’s first production car to feature a mid-mounted, V-8 engine. Hit the play button above to watch a happy owner talk about his 1975 Dino-badged sports car in an enchanting Gear Patrol video .

Chris Harris has done it again. He has found the ultimate classic car to test drive that makes us drool. This time around, Harris gets some time behind the wheel of the Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France . No, this isn’t some pace car used to lead segments of the famed bicycle race. Rather, this classic racer was once a long-distance race car that tackled asphalt and dirt roads with authority in the Tour de France Automobile.

Under the hood is a 3.0-liter, 12-cylinder engine that produced 240 horsepower in its racing days, but closer to 270 horses after modern modifications were made. That isn’t much power by today’s standards, but back in the 1950s, when this car did its racing, that was a ton of power.

Also unimpressive by today’s standards is this car’s 165-mph top speed. But picture hitting this top speed on a dirt road with 1950’s tires and four-wheel drum brakes, and you can see why only a brave few could actually pilot this rig.

The blue beauty in this video is set to head to auction soon, but the current owner was kind enough to allow Harris to pilot it. And as always, he delivers to us a great review with plenty of classic 12-pot noise to satisfy the ears. Is it simply spectacular to hear that small-displacement 12-cylinder hum along.

Jay’s latest adventure takes a deep dive into hot-rodding history with this beautiful 1932 Ford Highboy roadster . But don’t pass this off as just another deuce coupe . No, this car is the deuce coupe. Jay has with him Bruce Meyer, the car’s restorer and current owner, who tells of a storied past barely imaginable.

The story began in the late 1940s as U.S. soldiers were returning home from the war. At that time, Bob McGee was a student at the University of Southern California and had customized the 1932 Ford in ways never done before. He had notched the frame in order to lower the car, added a custom three-piece hood, V-notched the spreader bar, removed the fenders, shaved the radiator cap and door handles, reworked the car’s interior, and added a 21-stud, Flathead V-8 from a 1934 Ford.

The car then gains even more notoriety when Bob Petersen, the owner of Hot Rod Magazine and Petersen Publishing, shot a picture of McGee in his deuce coupe cruising along the USC campus for the cover of Hot Rod Magazine. As it turns out, McGee’s roadster was one of the first hot rods to grace the magazine’s cover.

McGee eventually had to sell his beloved roadster and the car underwent many other modifications over the years by the hands of several owners. That’s when Bruce Meyer got a hold of it. He painstakingly restored the car back to its original glory, even employing the direction of McGee in his older age.

Now we get to enjoy this piece of history as Jay and Bruce drive the 1932 Ford down its native streets of Southern California. This, my friends, is the definition of hot-rodding.

Good morning, TopSpeeders; we’re serving up a hot helping of vulcanized donuts for your visual consumption. Today’s chef is Brian Scotto and his 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo do the cooking. This isn’t just a regular 911 Turbo, this Porsche has been worked over by the Japanese company Rauh-Welt Begriff. Scotto and RWB have done some serious modifications to the Porsche , not exclusive to that outlandish body kit. The car’s suspension sits an inch and a half lower, and it rides on 265/40 series tires up front and crazy-big 315/30 series tires out back. The rubber wraps wheels from Fifteen52 sized in 18-by-11 inches and 18-by-12 inches respectively.

Since the car was built just days before the 2011 SEMA show, Scotto and RWB initially left the engine and drivetrain alone. That meant the turbocharged, 3.3-liter, flat-six engine originally cranked out 315 horsepower at 5,750 rpm and 332 pound-feet of torque at 4,500 rpm. Those were pretty healthy stats for a car built over 20 years ago. However in recent times, the guys at BBI Autosport slapped on a new exhaust and engine management tuning to squeeze an estimated 440 horses from the rear-mounted engine.

The story behind this Porsche’s trip to SEMA circles around Scotto’s and co-operator and WRC driver Ken Block’s launching of the Hoonigan brand. The Porsche served as the point car and help differentiate Block as an independent driver not attached to Ford.

All that’s well and good, but donuts are more fun. So enjoy this heaping helping of tire-burning, smoke-billowing, hooning fun. And make sure not to miss the vintage Mr. Donuts reference in the video.

ICON has done some pretty amazing things with old barn-find vehicles, forgotten for decades until the California team breathes new life into them. ICON’s M.O. is unlike other restoration companies, as its Derelicts line combines all the underpinnings of modern street machines, while keeping nearly every visible piece just as it was the day the company found it. ICON’s latest example is this beautiful 1948 Buick Super Convertible.

The process started when the Buick was found in a Pennsylvania garage. The car’s body was then carefully separated from its original chassis and laser-scanned. The team then spent hundreds of hours designing a new chassis to perfectly match the body’s underside, but would also hold performance gains not otherwise possible with the old 1948 frame.

The new Art Morrison chassis is complete with independent front suspension and a four-link rear suspension. Coil over JRI shocks hold up each corner while a 20-to-1 rack and pinion power steering system makes the Buick drive more like a Corvette. Speaking of Corvette , ICON dropped in a ZR1-sourced, supercharged, 6.2-liter LS9 V-8. The small block Chevy churns out 638 horsepower and 604 pound-feet of torque. A Supermatic 4L85E automatic transmission does the shifting, while a set of Z-rated, BF Goodrich G-Force tires lay the power down.

Though the interior looks completely original, ICON worked hard to hide all the modern electronic conveniences, including a web-enabled audio system with navigation, Bluetooth, a backup camera, and an Audison sound system. The touchscreen head unit is hidden behind the Buick’s original AM radio that articulates down when touched.

It’s amazing to see how well the project turned out. It took over a year to complete, and it’s easy to see why. The Buick Buick combines its original exterior and all its character, along with a kickin’ LS9 small block and a suspension that will handle the track. If that’s not a perfect combination, I don’t know what is.

Photo credit: Boldride

Click past the jump to read more about the ICON Derelict Buick Super Convertible

Source: Boldride

I, for one, am proud of every single owner of a great, unique or exotic car who drives them regularly. These cars are special, and they get people interested in automobiles. It is also a special experience to see something so cool and rare in the car world go rolling down the street. Sadly, as there are other cars on the road, there can be damage to these nearly priceless pieces of automotive history. Case in point is Jerry Seinfeld and his 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR .

Jerry is an avid car collector and Porsche enthusiast, but last week he sat and witnessed someone back into his pristine 911 RSR that was parked on the street. In a recent story in the Page Six section of the NY Post, Jerry recounts the entire terrifying, metal-crunching moment. He was sitting on a bench directly across the street from his parked car enjoying some coffee and the company of friend Nacho Figueras when the incident occurred. An older woman in a white BMW went to parallel park in the sport directly in front of the historic 911, but proceeded to back directly into the Porsche.

What followed was an obviously heated argument that ended with the woman fleeing the scene without providing any information for Jerry to use for insurance.

Thankfully, the car doesn’t seem to be destroyed, rather just mangled slightly, and I am sure Jerry will have it repaired and back on the road soon. Still, for a car that is only one of 49 in the world, it can be quit disheartening to see it meet the rear bumper of another car.

You can read the full account given by Jerry Seinfeld on the Page Six site linkedbelow.

Don’t let this stop you from driving these things, Jerry. We still love to see them, even if they get a little banged up from time to time.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR

Source: Page Six

Known as the most successful manufacturer ever to race in Formula One , Ferrari is also famous for its glorious sports car racing years. The Italians gathered no less than nine outright Le Mans wins and 13 World Sportscar Championships between the late 1940 and the early 1970s, being surpassed by very few companies in that department. Ferrari’s golden age of endurance racing came to a halt in 1974, when Enzo stopped all development of sports cars prototypes in order to focus on Formula One. Maranello lied dormant for nearly two decades until 1994, when the 333 SP, built at the request of amateur racer Giampiero Moretti, hit the track marking the brand’s return to sports prototype racing.

Designed by famed Italian chassis manufacturer Dallara, the 333 SP was offered to privateers who raced it with great success until 2003. The open-top race car not only managed to give Ferrari a triumphant return to sports car racing, it also became the only Ferrari to win the 24 Hours of Daytona and the 12 Hours of Sebring.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 333 SP

Introduced in 1953, the Ferrari 250 quickly became the company’s most successful vehicle lineup. It included everything from road-legal grand tourers to the 250 Testa Rossa and 250 LM race cars. More importantly, the range spawned the iconic 250 GTO, currently the most expensive Ferrari ever auctioned (as of August 20, 2014). The 250 line came to an end in 1964, when it was replaced by two distinct families, the 275 and 330. While the 275 GTB/C stepped in to substitute the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB/4 took center stage as Ferrari’s new flagship model.

Introduced at the 1966 Paris Motor Show , the GTB/4 quickly became popular with sports car enthusiasts and celebrities, especially in the United States. Even Hollywood actor and motoring icon Steven McQueen ordered one of the V-12-powered grand tourers, receiving it on the set of the "Bullitt" movie. McQueens example became the most expensive GTB/4 ever auctioned in 2014, when it crossed the block for $10 million. Because of this huge auction sum, we decided to have a closer look at this enticing, berlinetta-bodied Ferrari.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti


1 2 3 4 5 next >
Back to top