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  Classic Cars news and reviews.

By 1968, the Ford Mustang had already become one of the most popular cars in the United States. Affordable, available in three different body styles and with a bevy of inline-six and V-8 engines, Ford ’s pony was enjoying tremendous success. The arrival of the beefed-up Shelby Mustang and its many versions only made things better, but Ford and Carroll Shelby Shelby felt the pony could become even more impressive. Their dream came true in April 1968, when a brand-new version of the 428 Police Interceptor engine was fitted with improved-breathing heads and larger exhaust manifolds, giving birth to the 428 Cobra Jet. The mill quickly found its way into the Shelby GT500 , which became the GT500 KR or "King of the Road". Officially rated at 335 horsepower, but actually powered by no less than 400 ponies and 440 pound-feet of torque, the King gained iconic status almost immediately.

The moniker was discontinued for the 1969 model year, only a few months before Carroll Shelby terminated his agreement with Ford. The GT500 KR nameplate returned exactly 40 years later on the fifth-generation Mustang, this time adorning a 540-horsepower muscle car that was motivated by a 5.4-liter V-8. After all of these years, the first-generation GT500 KR is as formidable as it’s always been, but its statute and value have grown considerably in the eyes of muscle-car aficionados and collectors alike.

Updated 07/23/2014: A very rare Mustang GT 500 KR is being offered by RK Motors Charlotte for a price of $189,900. Click past the jump for more details.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1968 Shelby GT500 KR

Jay is riding low in this episode of Jay Leno’s Garage . Our legendary petrol-head host meets up with three low rider aficionados who take Jay through the ins and outs of low rider tech and history. The two beautiful low rider examples are a black, 1966 Chevrolet Impala and a pinstriped 1963 Chevy Impala Convertible. Both are completely customized with unique parts and outstanding chrome work.

Jay starts off talking with the editor of Lowrider Magazine, Joe Ray, about how the low-rider culture got its start back in the 1960s and how it’s spreading all over the world today.

After that, Jay talks with Chris Najera, the owner of the black 1966 Impala about why he kept a solid paint color and how he modernized a few key bits of the interior. Under the hood lies an absolutely beautiful V-8 drenched in chrome and brimming with power.

Brandon Brusca then shows Jay nearly every inch of his candy-colored orange 1963 Impala Convertible. Every single inch of the car is completely customized. The pinstriped paint job runs the entire length of the car and exemplified automotive artistic craftsmanship. A 409-cubic-inch V-8 burbles between pinstriped inner fender wells and is covered in chrome.

Jay continues to take a look at the ’63 Impala, but from the underside, where the craftsmanship and attention to detail matches that of the top side. There are even engravings on the chrome-plated link bars for the rear suspension. Every nut, every bolt, and every connector is shined to meticulous perfection.

The kicker to it all is the ’63 Impala’s air-suspension system. It utilizes air compressors originally built in the 1960s for U.S. fighter planes. The video might be long, but it’s worth your time, even if you’re not into the low-rider scene.

Most of us watched the Goodwood Festival of Speed to see hundreds of awesome road and race cars storm up the Hill. Others, including many past and present racing drivers, travel to Goodwood to hoon the vehicles we drool upon. But there’s a third category of motoring enthusiasts that take trips to England to pay million for the classic cars sold each year by Bonhams, one of the world’s oldest and largest auction house.

This year’s event brought together nearly 100 vehicles and more than 400 automotive-related collectors items, raising a staggering £22.6 million (nearly $39 million as of 06/27/2014). One car alone sold for nearly half that amount, with two more fetching more than $1 million each, rounding up yet another successful event.

Not surprising, the most expensive vehicle sold at Goodwood was a Ferrari . Maranello classics are already a common occurrence at such events, and very few change hands for less than $5 million. On the other hand, how often do you see a 102-year-old vehicle sell for more than $1 million? Head over below to find out more about the most expensive classic cars auctioned at Goodwood.

Click past the jump to read more about Bonhams’ sale at Goodwood

The Toyota Supra was designed to be a sporting machine that could compete with many of the major powerhouses of the day , but it wasn’t until the fourth generation Supra bowed in 1993, that the car gained its status as one of the all-time greats.

It featured an all-new exterior design that was more aerodynamic and much sportier looking than its predecessor. Gone were the sharp edges and pop-up headlamps to be replaced with long smooth curves. Along with the new look, the car also went on a diet losing 200 pounds or more, depending on the trim level.

As is the case with almost all major changes, fans of the car were worried Toyota was softening the intentions of the car. That was until they turned the key on the new drivetrains. While everyone thought Toyota was creating a friendlier, slower Supra, what it actually created was a supercar -eating monster that would grow into a cult icon.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1993 - 1998 Toyota Supra.

When the third-generation Toyota Supra made its debut, it came with a lot of firsts for the model. The most important was Toyota’s decision to finally develop the Supra as its own stand-alone sports car , free from any tie-ups between the Celica . It was a risk that Toyota took because the Supra had become so successful that it finally needed to stand on its own four wheels and shine. In addition to that, the third generation was also the first time that Supra didn’t come in the full-on fastback look that the first two generations did. While still retaining some of the basic design, the third-gen Supra’s length was cut by 1.6 inches but was wider by an inch, making for a stouter appearance than its elongated predecessors.

An oft-overlooked fact about the third-generation Supra is that Toyota initially slated it for release in the early 1986 model year, but production delays pushed it back to May 1986. This meant that there were actually two wholly different Supras available in the same model year, so the MK III Supra used the 1986.5 model year designation for clarity.

It was with the third-generation model that the world finally started to recognize the Supra was one of Toyota’s best works. The version lasted for a little over five years, quickly becoming one of the most sought-after Japanese sports cars in the market at that time.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1986.5 - 1992 Toyota Supra.

**Note** Our software does not recognize half model years, so please do not hate us in the comments because we listed this as a "1986" model in the title.

The relative success of the first-generation Supra left Toyota with a huge task on its hands. It wasn’t enough to just build on the popularity of the sports car ; the company had to exceed it with the new version. So in a lot of ways, the second-generation Supra was created to make sure that it wasn’t a flash-in-the-pan model.

The model ran from 1982 to 1986 and in that time, the Supra evolved and underwent a handful of changes, resulting in the model that cemented the Supra’s place in history as one of Toyota’s finest sports cars .

In the North American market, the second generation Supra, which was still known as the Celica XX in Japan, came in two different versions: Performance Type (P-Type) and Luxury Type (L-Type). Both versions were roughly identical to each other, except for some noticeable changes to the aesthetics and the available technology contained in the models.

The success of the second-generation Toyota Supra turned a lot of people into fans of the sports car, elevating its stature in the eyes of many as one of the best sports cars of its time. It even caught the attention of Motor Trend and Car and Driver, two magazines that awarded the Supra with their own honors, including MT’s "Import Car of the Year" and Car and Driver’s "Top Ten Best List" in 1983 and 1984.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1982 - 1986 Toyota Supra.

Back in the the 1970’s, the Celica was fighting the good sports car fight for Toyota as rival models, particularly the Nissan 240Z , burst into the scene. But it wasn’t until the latter part of that decade when Toyota decided to ramp up its efforts in the sports car market. That’s when the Toyota Supra was born. Based on the Celica until its third incarnation, the Supra became the sports car Toyota put up against some of the best its rivals had to offer. It’s popularity grew to such great lengths that the Japanese automaker even created a new logo just for the Supra.

The Toyota Supra may no longer exist and even with reports of its revival bubbling in the surface for years now, we can always look fondly at the first-generation Supra and say "that’s where it all began."

Click past the jump to read more about the 1979 - 1981 Toyota Supra.

Posted on by Shanto  

There was a well-established manufacturer half a decade before Aston Martin known as Lagonda. With some early success, Lagonda became quite famous in its time till the consequences of World War II caused major struggle to the manufacturer. In 1947, Aston Martin took possession of Lagonda and reserved the name of limited number, ultra-luxurious sedans .

Aston Martin resurrected the hibernating Lagonda name in 1974 at London Motor Show by announcing the “Aston Martin Lagonda V8 ”, of which only seven units were made. The new model revived name received a humdrum response from the market and Aston Martin went back to drawing board with William Tomas. In 1976, Aston Martin lifted the curtains from a striking new concept model which surged the popularity of the Lagonda brand in quick succession. Its redesigned Lagonda received a wild response and orders piled in. With demands breaking through the roof and production rate limited to only one per week, Aston Martin rolled out the first production model in 1979 and three years later, the car finally got cleared for sale in USA.

To make the exceptional design possible Aston Martin’s engineer pushed the V-8 engine as far back as possible and even then more room was required to make the mechanism work. The engineers hatched a new intake system to compensate the space, which restricted the engine output. Tackling the issue, Aston Martin installed larger intake valves after mending the engine’s cylinder walls to meet the expected power delivery.

Aston Martin launched the Lagonda Series 3 in 1986 at New York Motor Show and the Series 4 was unveiled in all-new form in 1986.

Images via Flickr.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1976-1989 Aston Martin Lagonda.

Posted on by Shanto  

It all started in 1956 when wealthy American businessman Tony Parravano hired the Italian manufacturer, Maserati to develop a new V-8 for use in the chassis of the Kurtis Indy. Maserati saw the opportunity to revive the project codenamed Tipo 54 and develop its own engine for use its sport-specific chassis. The original car carrying a V-6 engine with chassis number 3501 became the test bed for the car ordered by the American.

The 450S made its first appearance at the Swedish Grand Prix’s practice session in August 1956, stunning everyone with its tremendous acceleration and top speed. The car clocked the third best timing in the practice, but the underdeveloped car could not handle the vibrations resonating from the wrong firing order of the engine’s spark plugs. Afterwards, the 450S received a new chassis at Mondena factory.

The development continued and in 1957, the new production 450S was rolled out to have its maiden race at the 1000 km of Buenos Aires where it led the Ferrari twin-cam sports car by 10 seconds. The car suffered from a failed transmission and retired from the race. However, the car went on to claim its first ever podium finish in the 1957 Swedish GP. Sadly, FIA changed the rules next year, making 450S ineligible for the Grand Prix.

The car was quickly prepared for the 1956 Mille Miglia 1,000-mile race. Legendary driver Stirling Moss, along with Denis Jenkinson as navigator, experienced a brake failure and the car came to rest against a tree. Driver and co-driver walked away without a scratch, but the car had to return to the factory for repairs and further development.

Fantuazzi then came into picture when he designed a new body with a contoured design. The car also got a longer wheelbase to accommodate the new V-8 engine. The updated vehicle was tested in the Swedish Grand Prix in August 1956 where the car’s builders continued to tweak is new chassis and make improvements.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi.

Source: RM Aucions

Nearly two months after releasing the Alpinestars Car Pack , Turn 10 Studios has announced the introduction of a new downloadable bundle for the Forza Motorsport 5 racing game.

The new package includes ten diverse vehicles that will take users through different automobile eras. Those who fancy vintage American cars will get to drive the 1940 Ford De Luxe Coupe, while muscle car enthusiasts will be able to hoon the gorgeous 1957 Chevy Bel Air and the power-packing Chevelle SS-396 and Dodge Dart HEMI Super Stock.

The motorsports section is also well covered, with a 1958 Aston Martin DBR1 and a 2013 BMW M3 race car included. The second Aston Martin gamers will get their hands on is the 2011 V12 Zagato , with more British heritage coming with the 1966 Ford Lotus Cortina.

Lastly, the 1986 Alfa Romeo GTV-6 will give you a taste of pure Italian performance, while the 1973 Mazda RX-3 will be the only Japanese vehicle waiting to be hooned via the game controller.

The Meguiar’s Car Pack is available for $9.99 in the Xbox Live Marketplace and at no cost to users that already own the Forza Motorsport 5 Car Pass.


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