coupe

coupe

  A coupe is a car body style with a close-coupled interior offering either two seats or 2+2 seating (space for two passengers up front and for two occasional passengers in the rear). Through the 1950s convertible models were sometimes called convertible coupes, but since the 1960s the term "coupe" has generally been applied exclusively to fixed-roof models. Coupes generally, but not necessarily, have two doors, although automobile makers have offered four-door coupes and three- and five-door hatchback coupes, as well.

Every year, there’s always a car that captures the heart of aftermarket companies and this year it’s the BMW 4 Series . Bavaria’s new sports coupe has become the flavor of the year for tuning firms. The 4 Series love has become so rampant that even Alpha N Performance is getting in on the fun with its work on the 4 Series’ big brother, the M4 .

For now, Alpha N Performance has only produced a basic engine upgrade for the M4. The tuner still has more tricks up its sleeve in the future, including aerodynamic components and two more stages of performance upgrades. But right now, the Stage 1 engine kit is all it has for the M4.

You can draw your own conclusions on the tuner’s work on the M4. In some way, it does lack the wow factor we normally attribute to tuning programs, but for what it was able to accomplish — developing a system for the M4 is no small feat — Alpha N Performance is on the right track toward building a tuning kit that we can all get behind. Besides, it’s not totally fair to judge a tuner on a program that still has plenty of room to evolve in the future.

Hopefully, we see the final product, complete with the Stage 2 and 3 performance upgrades, sooner rather than later. We’ve got high hopes on your kit, Alpha N Performance. Don’t leave us hanging.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2014 BMW M4 By Alpha-N Performance.

Long before the 918 Spyder came to take over as Porsche’s range-topping supercar , the Stuttgart-based automaker had the Carrera GT . But the roadster built between 2004 and 2007 wasn’t the first road-legal supercar offered by the German automaker. The saga began as early as 1986, when the Porsche 959 was introduced.

Born as a Group B rally car in an era dominated by monstrous WRC machines, the 959 developed into a production car when FIA’s homologation regulations required at least 200 street-legat units to be built for a rally car to become a contender in the sport. Although it shared many of its internals and the rear-engine configuration with the 911, the 959 was offered with standard four-wheel-drive, becoming the first Porsche to carry such a configuration. Later on, Porsche used the technology to build its first all-wheel-drive 911.

Hailed as the most technologically advanced vehicle of the 1980s, the 959 boasts impressive performance figures. The range-topping 959 Sport model needs only 3.7 seconds to sprint from 0 to 62 mph and just 13 seconds to accelerate from naught to 124 mph. Its quarter-mile time stands at 11.9 seconds and reaches a top speed of 209 mph.

Although short-lived, the 959’s racing career was equally successful. A rally version went on to win the Paris-Dakar Rally in 1986, while a Le Mans-spec variant finished first in its class and seventh overall at the 24-hour event the same year. Sadly, the 959 never got to compete in the World Rally Championship, as the Group B class was abolished at the end of the 1986 season. Nevertheless, the 959 earned its place among the world’s greatest supercars and in the hearts of petrol-blooded enthusiasts, myself included.

Paying tribute to the 959 never gets old, which is why various publications and online magazines keep rolling out extensive articles and videos on the German masterpiece. The folks over at XCAR are the latest to join the ranks of those who worship the 959 by putting together the review-like, 10-minute video above.

The Jaguar Performance Driving Academy recently touched down at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas. What was it doing there? Here’s a hint: it has something to do with the F-Type Coupe R . Jag’s new track-focused, British wonder car was the undisputed star of the event, a feat in itself considering that the session also had Sebastian Stan and Mena Suvari in attendance.

You’ll probably remember Stan for his ubiquitous role as the Winter Soldier in the latest Captain America movie. Mena Suvari hasn’t had a lot of mainstream roles recently, but if you were a teenager of the 90’s, you should have no problem remembering her from the American Pie franchise and the critically acclaimed American Beauty.

For the event, both Stan and Suvari traded their Hollywood hats for racing helmets. The two got to spend some quality time with the F-Type Coupe R, joining other Performance Academy participants race around the Circuit of the Americas with their own F-Type Coupe R.

Everyone looked like they had an incredible time racing the high-performance F-Type Coupe R around the track. At least one of the participants enjoyed it enough to even throw an “awesome sauce” scream of delight.

The two Hollywood stars sounded like they had a blast, too. Who knows, maybe they already have orders in place for their own F-Type Coupe R models. After all, purchases like that are in always in play for people with the finances to do it.

Traveling at high speeds involves some pretty scary physics. That’s why the Bloodhound SSC project has been in the works for nearly five years and involves some of the brightest engineers from around the globe. The latest video to come from the British project shows the level of testing undergone for a single part, in this case, the wheel.

See, the Bloodhound SSC is a supersonic car designed for solely for breaking the 1,000-mph speed barrier. The ‘car’ is powered by a jet engine and rockets to achieve such a fast velocity. At 1,100 mph, the Bloodhound’s 35.5-inch (902.6-mm) aluminum wheels spin at a whopping 10,429 rpm. That’s 174 rotations per second!

At that speed, the wheel’s diameter expands by 1.6 mm (0.62 inches) and its temperature starts to rise. In fact, during testing the wheel started to heat up at the rate of two degrees Fahrenheit per second due to aerodynamic friction. At its max, the wheel peaked at 204 degrees Fahrenheit, only 100 degrees shy of aluminum becoming soft.

The Bloodhound SSC team is continuing to work throughout the year with hopes of breaking the 1,100-mph land-speed at a location in South Africa.

There was a time when Ferrari dominated sports car racing . It happened until about 50 years ago, right before Ford had introduced the Le Mans-winning GT40 and Porsche dominated the tracks with the iconic 917 . Two years after the latter began dominating endurance events, Ferrari had abandoned sports car racing to focus on Formula One. It was 1973, and the Ferrari 312PB had retired as the company’s last prototype racer.

Although eclipsed by many racers of the day, the 312PB managed to achieve 15 wins in 72 events. Powered by a flat-12 engine based on the 3.0-liter Formula One unit, the Italian sports car made a name for itself by winning prestigious events. Its trophy case includes the 1000km Buenos Aires, Daytona 6 Hours, Sebring 12 Hours, 1000km Nurburgring , and the Targa Florio, among others. The list of drivers that hopped in its cockpit is equally impressive and features the likes of Jacky Ickx, Brian Redman, Ronnie Peterson and Mario Andretti. That’s a lineup full of skilled and race-winning aces right there.

Sure, it’s not the most beautiful Ferrari ever built, but the 312PB was not conceived to win beauty contests. It’s main goal was to win races and, for the most part, it succeeded. It was renowned for its precise handling and quickly became a crowd pleaser due to its piercing exhaust note. Thankfully enough, some of the few 312PBs ever built have been stored and maintained for the past 40 years, so we can see and hear them race once again. Thanks to Petrolicious and Steven Read, we can do that at the push of button. Just hit play and don’t be shy with the volume, you’re in for a real treat.

The 2015 Ford Mustang hasn’t even hit showrooms yet, but the aftermarket performance scene is already preparing for upgrades and modifications. Legendary Mustang modifier Roush Performance is among the first on the scene with a silhouette teaser of its upcoming creation. Roush posted the image on its Facebook, saying more information would be slowly revealed over the next few weeks. As of August 1, 2014, the picture and pure speculation is all we have to go on.

Roush is famous for offering different stages of performance boosts via bolt-on parts, namely superchargers. It’s very likely this trend will continue with the new Mustang. Remember, the ‘Stang’s 5.0-liter V-8 isn’t changing all that much for 2015, so Roush already knows what it is dealing with.

Roush’s current supercharger offerings include Stages one through three. The Stage 1 kit bumps power up 155 horses and 115 pound-feet to total an impressive 575 horsepower and 505 pound-feet. What’s more, the Stage 3 kit pushes power to 675 horsepower and 585 pound-feet of torque. Those are stout numbers, to say the least.

Of course a Roush-upgraded Mustang wouldn’t be complete without a body kit. No doubt Roush will add aero bits like diffusers, spoilers, and chin splitters to the new pony car.

But hang on, the 2015 Mustang has a new performance-minded engine under its hood: the 2.3-liter EcoBoost. Perhaps Roush is planning performance upgrades for the four-pot. A bigger turbo? Larger intercoolers? Upgraded fuel injectors? Maybe Roush will push the 310-horse EcoBoost closer to 400 horsepower? For now, it’s all speculation, but stay tuned as Roush debuts its plans for the all-new Mustang .

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Ford Mustang.

Source: Roush

Every now and again, we’re reminded of just how fun driving can be. Simple, purpose-built cars are often the best way of getting this reminder. The Alfa Romeo 4C is one of those cars. Its light curb weight and moderate power means its power to weight ratio is sublime. Its sport exhaust is missing a muffler but possesses a seductive roar. Its manual steering communicates every ripple in the road. These types of vehicles don’t come around too often at an affordable price, but somehow, Alfa has done it.

In the video above, MotorTrend’s Carlos Lago takes the 4C out for track testing and spirited cruising long the Pacific Coast Highway. The 4C posted some pretty respectable numbers at the track, as 60 mph came in 4.1 seconds and the quarter mile happened in 12.7 seconds at 106.7 mph. It also held an impressive 0.94 g of lateral acceleration and stopping from 60 mph took a mere 97 feet. Those numbers come darn close to supercar stats, especially considering the 4C’s starting price of just $55,195 and its 1.7-liter, turbocharged inline-four is only producing 237 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque.

Even more impressive is the 4C’s fun factor. Its loud exhaust and quick-shifting six-speed twin-clutch transmission make for a thrilling ride. Add to that its mid-mounted engine location and curb weight of only 2,437 pounds and you’ve got a recipe for perfection.

We subscribe to the school of thought that if you do something long enough, you’re bound to become good at it. Chris Harris has driven cars for a long time, so presumably, he’s also done a lot of drifting in these cars. We’re inclined to believe that holds true, especially because we enjoyed his little instructional video on how to properly drift the BMW M235i .

Chris is taking his talents back to YouTube as part of the reinvented Drive channel. What better way to do get the ball rolling (again) than teaching viewers the art of drifting the M235i . This actually isn’t the first time Harris has done something like this.
He once taped a similar instructional guide to the drifting using his own M5 so this should be right in his wheelhouse. The video itself is almost 12 minutes long, so if you want to take some notes, now’s a good time to get the pen and paper ready.

Like every Harris video, it’s every bit as fun from the start as it is at the end. Who knows, you might even learn a thing or two about drifting vehicles in general.

While Ferrari needs no introduction, Brabham is a name some of you might not remember so well. Founded by Jack Brabham, who died earlier this year aged 88, and Ron Tauranac, Brabham spend three decades in Formula One , in which it won four drivers’ championships and two constructors’ titles. Its first successful campaigns, and the only ones to bring both the drivers’ and constructors’ championship, came in 1966 and 1967. Although it won two more drivers’ titles, Brabham failed to win the constructors’ championship for the third time. However, the Brits came close on many occasions. 1970 was an important year for Brabham. Although it only managed fourth position at the end of the season, the team lost its number one driver, Jack Brabham. The man that drove the race cars built by his own hands retired from racing following the Mexican Grand Prix. The 1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33 was the last F1 car he had driven during an official event, making it that much more important to the company, second to only the Repco-powered single-seaters that brought the 1966 and 1967 championships.

In this car, Brabham won one race and scored three more podiums, while teammate Rolf Stommelen added a further third-place finish. Brabham, one of eight teams to use Ford’s DFV engine that year, ended the season behind Lotus, Ferrari and March, but ahead of McLaren , BRM and Matra. What made the BT33 such a competitive racer? Read on to find out.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1970 Brabham-Cosworth Ford BT33.

Source: Bonhams

Ever wish you could flog a brand-new Lamborghini Huracán around Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca under the direction of Lamborghini’s own Squadra Corse professional driving team? Sure you have. Well, now Lamborghini is offering the first-ever chance this coming September. This marks Lamborghini Accademia’s first time offering the program inside the U.S., and it comes at a perfect time too. The Accademia is bringing a fleet of brand-new Huracáns to the event, which runs from September 14 through 17. Students will start out with the essentials such as braking, accelerating, slalom, drifting, and section training.

Leading the one-day course are the team members of Lamborghini’s Squadra Corse, part of Lambo’s in-house research and development department dedicated to motorsports. The department’s focus includes GT3, the Super Trofeo series, and customer driving courses such as this one.

Once students learn the fundamentals of handling a 602-horsepower car, they get to run the entire Leguna Seca track with one-on-one guidance and video coaching. When the course is completed, each driver is awarded a swanky certificate of completion from Lamborghini. Also included are some fine dining opportunities during the day’s events.

Thankfully, you don’t have to be a current Lamborghini owner to participate. In this case, money talks well enough. The one-day driving school costs $4,995 for a single driver. Your significant other can tag along and enjoy the food and festivities for an extra $795. Other packages are available for those looking to book a hotel through Lamborghini.

While the price tag might seem steep, think of it as cheap insurance for both your car and your life. There is no substitute for good driving.

Click past the jump to read more about Lamborghini’s new North American Performance Driving School.


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