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Covini C6W

Covini C6W

It took longer than anybody would’ve expected or wanted – 34 years in fact – but the Covini C6W is finally taking shape and was in fact unveiled earlier this week. You have to say that those guys over at Covini don’t lack in patience and determination.

With so many delays that would put Gran Turismo 5 to shame, the six-wheeled supercar is gearing up for its close up after its last supposed release back in 2008 which was scuttled due to technical problems. The car had originally made an appearance at the 2004 Geneva Motor Show. In fact, the Covini C6W project was first brought to light as early as 1974, but because of one problem or another – chief among them was the technology, or lack thereof at that time – the C6W never got off the ground.

However, thanks to a joint venture between Covini Engineering and PMI SpA, Ferruccio Covini’s brainchild of a supercar is finally ready for its close-up. It might have aged quite a bit through all those delays, but in the auto industry – as in life – there’s an adage that we always say that the C6W can proudly hold on to: better late than never.

Details after the jump.


Six wheels are supposed to be more than just a novelty. The Tyrrell P34 ran in F1 races in the late 70s with the idea that smaller tires could reduce the frontal area. Practicality eventually outweighed any advantage the four small front tires offered, and six-wheeled racers faded away.

Now designer Ferruccio Covini wants to bring the six-wheeled idea to the streets with the Covini C6W . The car was first shown at the 2004 Geneva Motor Show, but Covini admits the the car has been a 30 year work in progress (possibly inspired by the Tyrrell?) It has all the makings of a decent sports car: italian design, removable roof, and a 4.2-liter V8 making 440 hp. The only question that remains is there really a need for a six-wheeled car?

Covini sees the advantage of six wheels on the street as producing more grip, better handling, and providing extra security (such as more contact area for braking and the ability to continuing driving with a flat tire.) Does that make up for the odd looks and 50 percent higher tire bills? Well, there are a few wealth individuals out there who may get to be the judge. The C6W is going into production at the rate of about six per year.

Source: Italia Speed

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