diy

diy

Posted on by TB +  

All this talk of gorgeous HD Point-of-View driving videos reminds me of a knockout drive to share here as part of a travel article.

The four videos show the high-def ascent of the Pikes Peak Toll Road outside Colorado Springs, Colorado. Taken earlier this summer by none other than this grinning goon.

The car of choice for this adventure is the only car for the job, in my opinion. My cherished but battered 2005 http://www.topspeed.com/cars/subaru... Subaru Legacy GT manual Wagon.

This is the car that I mention in my bio as currently non-functional in garage ion the updated TopSpeed Team page...

It is still needing a big electronics overhaul to come back to life as spunky as it was when new.

But watching the clouds roll by while the upgraded turbo spins furiously and boost spikes as high as 19 PSI.

Climbing Pikes Peak takes about 45 minutes and costs about $12.00 per car. It is mostly tourists driving very slowly, with double yellow no-passing zones all the way to the top.

But on that rare sunny day, the only things slowing you down are fear of heights and the thin atmosphere at the 14,000-foot crest of the peak.

Click past the jump for the next four videos in this series, in order, going up and coming down the legendary Pikes Peak in all its high-definition glory.

Wintertime is quickly approaching, and the last thing you want to do is drive your $250k supercar or $52 million classic racer through snow, slush and salt. So, unless you live here in sunny Florida or Southern Cali, your only real option is to load you precious in a storage garage, and park it for the season.

The issue in storing a car for months on end is that the fuel system can get excessive moisture in it, causing rusting in the tank, and the fuel-injection system or carburetor can get gummed up from oxygen attacking the fuel. You could drain the tank, but then you run the risk of even more water infiltrating the fuel system, plus the rubber seals in the fuel system, which are designed for constant contact submersion in fuel, can dry up and start leaking when you fire up the engine for the first time.

So, you may be in a panic now, but we do have a solution. Fill your tank 95 percent full with your favorite fuel and add the prescribed amount of STA-BIL “Storage” Fuel Stabilizer to the gas tank. After adding STA-BIL to the tank, run the car for a few minutes to circulate it through the fuel system. Then, your good ol’ girl is ready for hibernation. Come springtime, when you crack open the storage unit, you will be instantly greeted by the old familiar rumble of your car’s engine without even a hint of a stumble from bad fuel, varnish or water in the system.

What’s more, STA-BIL is good for storage periods longer than just one season. In fact, it will continue working hard to keep your car’s fuel system in top shape for up to 12 months.

Additionally right now, STA-BIL is offering fans on Facebook a chance to win an $800 storage shed and STA-BIL product by simply sharing a storage tip, experience or nightmare here and a simple “like” of their Facebook page. Good luck!

If you drive your car hard, then chances are you are worried about your engine more than most drivers. Forums are filled with horror stories that will transform the biggest fanboy into a doubter at the drop of a hat. Most of us change our oil on a regular basis, some people waste their time with 3,000-mile oil changes, but I prefer to inspect my oil filter very often, and especially after each track day.

If your engine is constantly nearing its redline, then it will like shed bits of various metal components, which is actually fairly normal. Though this is a normal thing to happen, these contaminants can get caught up in the filter and restrict the oil flow just enough to cause damage at higher rpm.

Few racers know that you can actually change the filter without doing a complete oil change. So you can keep all but about a half-quart of the good oil in the engine and get a fresh filter — I prefer Purolator — in there to keep it all flowing as it’s supposed to.

Click past the jump to see how it’s done.


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