Ferrari 250

Ferrari 250

There are literally a handful of cars in the history of the industry that’s revered more than the Ferrari 250 GTO . Really, you can probably count in one hand those models and we’re guessing you’re even going to have a hard time doing it. Such is the level of respect people have of this true classic. Consider how much a 250 GTO fetches in auctions these days. Last November, a variation of the 250 GTO - the 250 LM - sold for $14.3 million . But even that pales in comparison to the incredible $52 million price Connecticut-based collector Paul Pappalardo paid for a 1963 250 GTO. So yeah, unless there’s a DeLorean out there that actually flies, no car today - classic or modern - will even come close to sniffing that record purchase.

So imagine what it must have felt for Petrolicious to get its hands on a 250 GTO. In this video, Derek Hill, the son of former Formula One champion and Ferrari factory driver Phil HIll, managed to acquire a 1964 250 GTO. We can only wonder what it must have felt like to be entrusted with a car that probably has a higher value that the GDP of some countries. But if anybody understood the value of this car, it’s Hill. After all, his father actually raced this exact 250 GTO at the Daytona Continental, which the older Hill ended up winning.

You really can’t understate the rarity of this particular GTO, chassis #5571. It’s actually one of the last GTOs ever built and was also the first of the Series II bodies and it came with a 3.0-liter V-12 engine that produces 300 horsepower.

Not that we’re pining for it to hit any kind of auction in the future, but can you imagine how much it would fetch in a setting like that? It’s not just a 250 GTO; it’s a 250 GTO with a real racing history attached to it.

North of $50 million? We’d be fools not to at least consider it.

Posted on by Tushar  

Ever wondered, why the Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider has "California" in its name? Here’s why. A Ferrari dealer based out of the U.S. requested the company to make a car named after their biggest market and hence the name. The sunshine state of California has been the home of Hollywood for ages and money was never short.

Even today, the sheer number millionaires in the state is mind-boggling. That said, with the advent of the age of information and technology, a new generation of billionaires have emerged. Anyway, back to the California Spider. The 1958 Ferrari 250 GT California Spider LWB will hit the auction block soon.

Experts suggest, the car could be valued over $8 million! One reason for such a high price is the fact that back in the days, Ferrari only built 50 examples of the California Spider. Now, the Ferrari 250 GT was a thoroughbred racer on which the California was based. The "LWB" stands for "Long Wheelbase". The market for old and rare Ferraris is huge. Only this year, RM Auctions sold an equally rare Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider for 25 million dollars!

And that’s not all, an even exclusive Ferrari 250 GTO fetched no less than $50 million. A short wheelbase version of the 250 GT California Spider also found a buyer recently. He apparently shelled out $11 million for the 250 GT California Spider SWB. The LWB California that is to be auctioned by RM Auction in Arizona is the 11th chassis (out of 50) produced by Ferrari and worked upon by the legendary metal worker Scaglietti.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GT California Spider LWB

Posted on by Tushar  

If it’s a classic from Maranello that is rare and has won races in the past, you can’t expect it to come cheap. That fact that was proved once again at a car auction in New York, where a gorgeous 1964 Ferrari 250 LM, along with other more collectible items from the history of the automobile, were on sale.

Noted auction houses, Sotheby’s and RM Auctions , brought 32 trophy vehicles that fetched a total of $62.8 million in sales. Of that $62.8 million, the Ferrari 250 LM was contributed a whopping $14.3 million, more than double that of the previous 250 LM sold and a new record for the model.

The sale of the 1964 250 LM also got its name in the costliest Ferrari’s ever sold list. Ferrari never produced more than 32 examples of the 250LM.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1964 Ferrari 250 LM

Posted on by Simona  

Last year, a Ferrari 250 sold for $32 million . This price certainly sounds like a bargain, when compared to the price paid for a 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO racecar . Numerous reports indicate that an unknown man paid $52 million to get the car. There is no official confirmation on this, but according to Bloomberg, the price was confirmed by three specialist traders.

If this sale price is accurate, this easily trumps the $34,711,200 sale of a Ferrari 250 GTO that was once driven by Stirling Moss.

The car was once owned by the Greenwich, Connecticut-based collector, Paul Pappalardo, then by a Spanish collector. Pappalardo bought the car in 1974, paid a handsome fee to restore it and after that, it saw use in many historic races, including the 2002 Le Mans Classic. After that the car was sold.

When asked about this subject, Pappalardo said he has no comment, but it’s pretty clear that the Ferrari 250 is becoming a great collection.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GTO.

Source: Bloomberg
Posted on by TB +  

The swinging 60s just brings up this roasted and muddy air of sex, sweat and drugs. Enough to intoxicate even the plastic hippies among us, the 1960s is rapidly becoming the most profitable segment of the classic supercar market.

And for good reason. Simple leather is mixed with gasoline until emotions boil. This list spans such greats as the Ferrari 250GT California Spider LWB Competizione to the 365 GTB/4 Daytona . And what a long, strange trip it was between those two masterpieces.

The birth of the Porsche 911 , the Aston Martin DB5 , the Shelby Cobra and Ford GT40, the Maserati Ghibli Spyder and many more.

All of the cars from this era are rich in prose. Sean Connery’s name pops up repeatedly, and so does Steve McQueen and Sir Paul McCartney. These were mens’ men in a time of changing morals on a global scale.

But the coupes and ragtops these gents preferred are really fit for the ages. So throw on some Aviators and slip into your slimmest racing loafers.

Click past the jump for a sunny-Sunday donut run in the Top-Ten Best Supercars from the 1960s.

Back in February a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO has been sold for an amazing £20.2 million - or about $32 million at the current exchange rates. Now one Ferrari 250 GTO Series 1 unit has been listed at Anamera.com for an even more impressive $41 million.

Ferrari produced only 39 250 GTO units between 1962 and 1964 and it is being considered to be one of the greatest Ferrari models ever built. Most of the work has been made by Chief engineer Giotto Bizzarrini Bizzarrini and designer Sergio Scaglietti whom have spent hours in the wind tunnels and on the race tracks perfecting the body of the GTO. The result was a top speed of 174 mph.

The model is powered by a 3.0-liter Colombo V12 engine used in the Test Rossa. This was an aluminum engine with magnesium cam covers, six 38 DCN Weber Weber carburetors, and a dry sump oil system. The engine delivers a total of 300 horsepower and sprints the car from 0 to 60 mph in just 6.1 seconds.

Source: Anamera

The Ferrari California Spider alone is one of the most desirable Ferraris and sports cars in the world. This 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione, which belonged to the late Sherman Wolf, is an even more desirable model, as it is one of nine examples that boast an all-alloy body and a long wheelbase. That rarity is something that will drive this car to between the $7 and $9 million mark.

This sample was actually the first Ferrari that the famed collector owned, and made its way to Wolf after first being owned by George Reed. Wolf also ran this Ferrari in the first ever Colorado Grand, just adding more to its storied history.

On the mechanical side, this 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione boasts full competition specifications. It has an outside plug motor that has TR heads resting on top of it, 4-wheel disc brakes, velocity stacks, and a ribbed gearbox to help keep it cool. The engine is a 2,953 cc V-12 with three Weber carbs mounted atop it and a 9.8-to-1 compression ratio. It punches out 280 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 203 pound-feet of torque at 5,500 rpm.

The body is draped in a medium shade of red and was fully restored by Ferrari specialist, David Carte. The wheels are the factory-style wires and the headlights boast the full-racing covers to help add to the car’s aerodynamic look.

This 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione is being offered up at the Pebble Beach Auction on August 18th and 19th, 2012 by Gooding & Company. It is one of four Ferraris owned by the Wolf estate that are up for auction in Pebble Beach.

UPDATE 08/20/2012: The Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione has just set a record at Monterey for all-time high price. The classic, drop-top sports car was auctioned off for a whopping $11,275,000! Someone really wanted that car!

Updated 12/27/2013: A Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider will be put on auction by RM Auctions in Arizona on Friday, January 17, 2014. The car is expected to fetch around $7-9 millions!

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

The 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO is, without question, the rarest and most sough-after Ferrari ever built. Hardly surprising, too, considering that only 36 models were ever built and it carried an iconic design and ahead-of-its-time mechanics.

This year, the 250 GTO is celebrating its 50th anniversary and Ferrari is preparing for a grand celebration that the car so fittingly deserves. One of the Ferrari’s partners, Hublot is lending its support with the production of the Ferrari 250 GTO Classic Fusion Watch, a time piece that pays homage to the iconic Ferrari.

Unveiled last week in an event at the home of Dom Pérignon Champagne at Abbaye de Hautvillers in France, the special edition timepiece is truly a watch for the books. In celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 250 GTO, Hublot designed the Ferrari 250 GTO Classic Fusion Watch with the finest of details, highlighted by a 45mm encasement machined out of titanium and fitted with a skeletonized Tourbillion movement. The Swiss watchmaker also added GTO references on the watch, including the customized chassis numbers from the cars and the use of barenia calfskin on the watch’s strap. Finally, a unique barrel drum was also designed in the watch, which you can see at the 12 o’clock position. This is as unique and as intricate a detail as you can expect from a timepiece brand like Hublot.

Unfortunately for timepiece enthusiasts, getting your hands on one of these watches is next to impossible...unless of course you happen to own one of the remaining 250 GTOs still in existence today.

The Ferrari 250 GT lineup was a direct spawn of the 250 racers from the 1950s. In 1954, the first of the 250 GTs, the 250 Europa GT, came into existence, bearing a 217-horsepower V-12 engine and a long racing bloodline. The 259 GT line was neither a long-lived nor mass produced product, as it only lasted one decade and a fairly limited production number.

In 1962, Ferrari released a new version of the 250 GT, which was dubbed the 250 GT Lusso, “Lusso” meaning “Luxury.” The 250 GT/L is one of the more rare Ferraris in the world today, as only 350 models were ever built and the number of surviving models is not readily available.

If you have ever wanted to own one of these particularly rare machines, now is the time to act, as RM Auctions is offering a 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta up for sale in Monaco on May 11th and 12th, 2012. Not only is this an extremely rare model, but it was the 4th from the last one ever manufactured.

You may be wondering how well this 48-year-old Ferrari is holding up to the test of time.

Click past the jump to find out.

The going price for a Ferrari 250 GTO , at least in the auction market, has a base of seven figures. That means that if you have plans of owning one, you need to have a pretty deep set of pockets.

But if finances are a question, you can still own something akin to a 250 GTO, except that instead of the actual classic Ferrari, you’ll be going home with a set of cufflinks.

Courtesy of GTO London, the gentleman’s accessory specialist, the Ferrari 250 GTO Barrel Ignition Cufflinks are probably the next best thing to owning an actual Ferrari 350 GTO. The cufflinks have been expertly hand-crafted and engineered to the finest detail, even featuring GTO London’s precisely-engineered signature cuff anchor mechanism.

In addition to the cufflinks, GTO London is also offering a slew of other items as part of their ‘Accensione’ collection. If cufflinks aren’t your thing, you can opt for a key fob and tie pin that has been designed to look like a Ferrari 250 GTO ignition. All these items, according to GTO London, are created from sterling silver, or, in some cases, with touches of Real Ferrari Metal.

And unlike an actual 250 GTO, owning these accessories won’t cost you a fortune. The Ignition Cufflinks retail at £245, which is north of $600 based on current exchange rates. As for the tie pin, that sells for £115 ($390) while the fob sells for £155 pounds ($390).

Source: GTO London

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