Ferrari 250

Ferrari 250

Chris Harris has done it again. He has found the ultimate classic car to test drive that makes us drool. This time around, Harris gets some time behind the wheel of the Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France . No, this isn’t some pace car used to lead segments of the famed bicycle race. Rather, this classic racer was once a long-distance race car that tackled asphalt and dirt roads with authority in the Tour de France Automobile.

Under the hood is a 3.0-liter, 12-cylinder engine that produced 240 horsepower in its racing days, but closer to 270 horses after modern modifications were made. That isn’t much power by today’s standards, but back in the 1950s, when this car did its racing, that was a ton of power.

Also unimpressive by today’s standards is this car’s 165-mph top speed. But picture hitting this top speed on a dirt road with 1950’s tires and four-wheel drum brakes, and you can see why only a brave few could actually pilot this rig.

The blue beauty in this video is set to head to auction soon, but the current owner was kind enough to allow Harris to pilot it. And as always, he delivers to us a great review with plenty of classic 12-pot noise to satisfy the ears. Is it simply spectacular to hear that small-displacement 12-cylinder hum along.

I’ve seen a lot of timepieces born from collaborations between an automaker and a watch company, but I honestly haven’t seen anything quite like this. British watchmaker Christopher Ward has created a limited-edition watch that has a piece of an actual car embedded in it. But wait, it’s not just any car we’re talking about here; this particular watch has an original piece of exterior paneling from a Ferrari 250 GTO . Let me know if any of you have seen or heard anything like this before because I surely haven’t. I also haven’t seen a unicorn in my lifetime, but that’s a story for another day.

This particular watch, though, is a thing of beauty. It’s called the C70 3527 GT and the ’3527 GT’ nomenclature is a nod to the chassis number of the seventh 250 GTO.

Christopher Ward is only releasing 100 pieces and each individual buyer will only receive one unit. Each watch will come with a price tag of $2,950, which is incredibly expensive compared to my humble, eight-year-old Casio G-Shock.

Should you be interested in ordering the C70 3527 GT Chronometer, you’re going to need to contact Christopher Ward directly to let its sales people know you’re willing to spend that much money on arguably the most unique auto-themed timepiece in the world. It’s first-come, first-served so act quickly if you want one.

Click past the jump to read more about the Christopher Ward C70 3527 GT Chronometer.

A 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO has become the most expensive car sold at auction after changing owners for a whopping $38,115,000 at Bonhams’ Quail Lodge Auction in Carmel, California. The classic Prancing Horse surpassed the auction record set by a 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196R Formula One race car that sold for $30 million at the 2013 Goodwood Festival of Speed Auction.

Only 39 of these Ferraris were built in the 1960s, with many of them fetching millions of dollars during either public auctions or private sales. One example that was owned by Stirling Moss changed hands for $35 million in 2012, while another 250 GTO sold for $52 million in 2013. Both were sold privately.

Powered by a 3.0-liter, V-12 engine, the 250 GTO shown above — chassis and engine number 3851GT — was driven to a second-place overall finish in the 1962 Tour de France by Jo Schlesser and Henry Oreiller. More a maintained car than a restored one, the 3851GT has been active all its 54-year-long life, being raced in many classic motorsport events. It’s one of the most often raced 250 GTOs and it has been in a single family ownership for the past 49 years. This pretty much explains the huge price tag, doesn’t it?

The $38-million 250 GTO wasn’t the only Ferrari to fetch big bucks at Bonhams’ sale in California. Ten other Italian sports and race cars crossed the block for a combined total of $65.9 million. The bundle included a 1962 250 GT SWB Speciale that sold for $6.8 million, a 1953 250 Mille Miglia Berlinetta driven by Phil Hill for $7.2 million, and a 1978 312 T3 Formula One car for $2.3 million.

Click past the jump to read about the Ferrari 250 GTO

Someone’s being a little sneaky with a certain 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO that one Ferrari expert has called out as a replica. You might remember that 250 GTO that popped up on Mobile.de a few weeks ago and came with a price tag of $64 million . The car received worldwide coverage because 1), it’s a Ferrari 250 GTO and 2), it costs $64 freakin’ million!

But Marcel Massini, regarded as the world’s leading Ferrari historian, is calling BS on the $64-million 250 GTO. "It’s a replica," Massini told. "I can tell you that with 100 percent certainty. I know where all of these cars are today. And this is not one of the original GTOs."

That part about knowing where all 39 250 GTOs are is apparently what separates Massini from the other Ferrari experts out there. Not only does he know where each one is, but he has photos and detailed histories of them. All 39 of them.

Massini also pointed out the car’s rather astronomical price tag as an indication that it’s fake, saying that anybody who owns a 250 GTO will use different methods to sell a car that’s expensive and incredibly rare. In short, posting it on a website isn’t one of them.

I personally have had no business dealings with Mobile.de so its hard to tell if they themselves were duped into selling a replica. The site has yet to issue any comments on Massini’s allegations, but it’s hard to go against someone who most agree is the authority on Ferrari’s history.

Updated 05/08/2014 @ 12:00 p.m.: Apparently the Ferrari expert was right, as the ad has been removed from mobile.de.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GTO.

Source: CNBC

There are only so many superlatives you can throw in the direction of the Ferrari 250 GTO . To this day, it’s still considered as the quintessential Ferrari . More importantly, the 250 GTO is also revered as one of the greatest cars of all time. The 250 GTO is treated with such high reverence that the car usually fetches millions on the auction block. We’ve seen a 250 GTO LWB California Spider Competizione fetch $11 million. Before that, a 250 LM scooped up $14.3 million. And before we forget, a pair of 250 GTOs have been sold for $32 million and $52 million, respectively. Here’s the takeaway: if you own a Ferrari 250 GTO, you’re in possession of a car that can net you at least $30 million. There is no shortage of people willing to spend that amount, maybe even double that, to own a piece of Ferrari history. That being said, a 1962 250 GTO has found itself on Mobile.de, considered as Germany’s biggest online marketplace. It’s a legitimate site that has seen its share of million-dollar transactions so there’s little reason to suggest that this isn’t an authentic 250 GTO.

Its seller, GT Golden Tower Real Estate and Luxury Gmbh, indicates that this red 250 GTO has traveled 15,000 kilometers (9,320 miles), which means that its owner has made relatively good use of it. But the car still looks to be in great shape. One photo even shows the car’s V-12 engine to be in immaculate shape. The interior also looks polished and show quality.

Everything about this 1962 250 GTO looks to be in order. Well, almost everything. See, GT Golden Tower thinks this 250 GTO can sell for €47.6 million, which is about $64 million based on current exchange rates on 7/29/2014.

That’s a lot of money, but as history has shown, it’s not an absurd figure for a Ferrari 250 GTO.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GTO.

Source: Mobile

There are literally a handful of cars in the history of the industry that’s revered more than the Ferrari 250 GTO . Really, you can probably count in one hand those models and we’re guessing you’re even going to have a hard time doing it. Such is the level of respect people have of this true classic. Consider how much a 250 GTO fetches in auctions these days. Last November, a variation of the 250 GTO - the 250 LM - sold for $14.3 million . But even that pales in comparison to the incredible $52 million price Connecticut-based collector Paul Pappalardo paid for a 1963 250 GTO. So yeah, unless there’s a DeLorean out there that actually flies, no car today - classic or modern - will even come close to sniffing that record purchase.

So imagine what it must have felt for Petrolicious to get its hands on a 250 GTO. In this video, Derek Hill, the son of former Formula One champion and Ferrari factory driver Phil HIll, managed to acquire a 1964 250 GTO. We can only wonder what it must have felt like to be entrusted with a car that probably has a higher value that the GDP of some countries. But if anybody understood the value of this car, it’s Hill. After all, his father actually raced this exact 250 GTO at the Daytona Continental, which the older Hill ended up winning.

You really can’t understate the rarity of this particular GTO, chassis #5571. It’s actually one of the last GTOs ever built and was also the first of the Series II bodies and it came with a 3.0-liter V-12 engine that produces 300 horsepower.

Not that we’re pining for it to hit any kind of auction in the future, but can you imagine how much it would fetch in a setting like that? It’s not just a 250 GTO; it’s a 250 GTO with a real racing history attached to it.

North of $50 million? We’d be fools not to at least consider it.

Posted on by Tushar  

Ever wondered, why the Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider has "California" in its name? Here’s why. A Ferrari dealer based out of the U.S. requested the company to make a car named after their biggest market and hence the name. The sunshine state of California has been the home of Hollywood for ages and money was never short.

Even today, the sheer number millionaires in the state is mind-boggling. That said, with the advent of the age of information and technology, a new generation of billionaires have emerged. Anyway, back to the California Spider. The 1958 Ferrari 250 GT California Spider LWB will hit the auction block soon.

Experts suggest, the car could be valued over $8 million! One reason for such a high price is the fact that back in the days, Ferrari only built 50 examples of the California Spider. Now, the Ferrari 250 GT was a thoroughbred racer on which the California was based. The "LWB" stands for "Long Wheelbase". The market for old and rare Ferraris is huge. Only this year, RM Auctions sold an equally rare Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spider for 25 million dollars!

And that’s not all, an even exclusive Ferrari 250 GTO fetched no less than $50 million. A short wheelbase version of the 250 GT California Spider also found a buyer recently. He apparently shelled out $11 million for the 250 GT California Spider SWB. The LWB California that is to be auctioned by RM Auction in Arizona is the 11th chassis (out of 50) produced by Ferrari and worked upon by the legendary metal worker Scaglietti.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GT California Spider LWB

Posted on by Tushar  

If it’s a classic from Maranello that is rare and has won races in the past, you can’t expect it to come cheap. That fact that was proved once again at a car auction in New York, where a gorgeous 1964 Ferrari 250 LM, along with other more collectible items from the history of the automobile, were on sale.

Noted auction houses, Sotheby’s and RM Auctions , brought 32 trophy vehicles that fetched a total of $62.8 million in sales. Of that $62.8 million, the Ferrari 250 LM was contributed a whopping $14.3 million, more than double that of the previous 250 LM sold and a new record for the model.

The sale of the 1964 250 LM also got its name in the costliest Ferrari’s ever sold list. Ferrari never produced more than 32 examples of the 250LM.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1964 Ferrari 250 LM

Posted on by Simona  

Last year, a Ferrari 250 sold for $32 million . This price certainly sounds like a bargain, when compared to the price paid for a 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO racecar . Numerous reports indicate that an unknown man paid $52 million to get the car. There is no official confirmation on this, but according to Bloomberg, the price was confirmed by three specialist traders.

If this sale price is accurate, this easily trumps the $34,711,200 sale of a Ferrari 250 GTO that was once driven by Stirling Moss.

The car was once owned by the Greenwich, Connecticut-based collector, Paul Pappalardo, then by a Spanish collector. Pappalardo bought the car in 1974, paid a handsome fee to restore it and after that, it saw use in many historic races, including the 2002 Le Mans Classic. After that the car was sold.

When asked about this subject, Pappalardo said he has no comment, but it’s pretty clear that the Ferrari 250 is becoming a great collection.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GTO.

Source: Bloomberg
Posted on by TB +  

The swinging 60s just brings up this roasted and muddy air of sex, sweat and drugs. Enough to intoxicate even the plastic hippies among us, the 1960s is rapidly becoming the most profitable segment of the classic supercar market.

And for good reason. Simple leather is mixed with gasoline until emotions boil. This list spans such greats as the Ferrari 250GT California Spider LWB Competizione to the 365 GTB/4 Daytona . And what a long, strange trip it was between those two masterpieces.

The birth of the Porsche 911 , the Aston Martin DB5 , the Shelby Cobra and Ford GT40, the Maserati Ghibli Spyder and many more.

All of the cars from this era are rich in prose. Sean Connery’s name pops up repeatedly, and so does Steve McQueen and Sir Paul McCartney. These were mens’ men in a time of changing morals on a global scale.

But the coupes and ragtops these gents preferred are really fit for the ages. So throw on some Aviators and slip into your slimmest racing loafers.

Click past the jump for a sunny-Sunday donut run in the Top-Ten Best Supercars from the 1960s.


1 2 3 4 next >
Back to top