Ferrari LaFerrari

Ferrari LaFerrari

  The Ferrari LaFerrari, which was also referred to ass the F70 and F150 during its testing phase, was unveiled at Geneva in 2013 and it features a V-12 engine with 800 horsepower and an electric motor that adds 163 horsepower to the mix. Though all of the details are not yet released, we do know that it'll sprint to 100 km/h in under 3 seconds, 200 km/h in under 7 seconds and 300 km/h in under 15 seconds.

Having 15 million Facebook fans is no small thing for an automotive company. Recently, Ferrari broke through that mark and as a sign of appreciation for its 15 million — and counting — Facebook fans, the Italian automaker decided to dedicate a lap in the Ferrari LaFerrari to all of them.

It’s not a typical hat-tip gesture, but it’s the kind that only a company like Ferrari can think of. The two-minute video was shot through Google Glass and gives a unique point of view on what a LaFerrari lap looks like when you’re riding shotgun and Rafaelle de Simone, Head of Development Ferrari Test Drivers, sitting behind the wheel.

Speaking of reaching 15 million fans, Ferrari is in elite company. We did a quick check on Facebook and discovered that of the major automakers in the world, only BMW has more Facebook fans (or ’likes," depending on how you describe it) at almost 17.77 million likes. Ferrari’s now at 15,021,085 likes so it still has a ways to go before it can catch BMW in that regard.

But hey, 15 million fans is an achievement in itself, and like only Ferrari can, it showed its love for its fans in about as unique a way as it could.

Watching the Ferrari LaFerrari smoke its tires on a race track never gets old. Sometimes, all you have to do is sit back and watch because seeing it mesmerizes you. That was the case in this video when the folks over at Top Gear Magazine were given a chance to take the LaFerrari out for a spin.

It may not be as interesting without the always entertaining comments of Jeremy Clarkson while he sits behind the wheel and starts bloviating about how mental the LaFerrari is, but the video is still worth checking out.

It’s not too often we get to see the mighty Ferrari supercar get pushed to the limit like it was in this video so you can appreciate the fact that while this supercar costs over seven digits, people can still channel that beast within and unleash it out in its natural elements.

We’ve all done it — taken a wrong turn just to follow a Lamborghini or Porsche, just for a few more seconds of staring at its beautiful exterior and listening to its engine’s exhaust with our windows down. To see a rare car on the road is well, rare, but Tim Burton of Shmee150 got the chance to follow the LaFerrari, the latest in ultimate hypercar eye candy from Ferrari.

What’s more, Burton‘s vantage point happen to be a new F-Type R Coupe on loan from Jaguar as a group of motoring enthusiast traveled around the Italian countryside celebrating the Mille Miglia road rally .

In the video above, the LaFerrari mostly shows off its posterior as the line of cars wind up the curvy roads. Towards the end, however, the privileged driver of the Ferrari decided to pull a dumb and dangerous U-turn just shy of a corner on a two-lane road. While the move was questionable, it affords us the chance as candid video of the car’s side and front.

Though the LaFerrari has been out for nearly a year now, videos of sightings are still rare thanks to a 499-unit production run. That’s a sad limit for such a limitless performance car. Power comes from a 6.3-liter V-12 and two electric motors all packaged together in a 963-horsepower combination. With a 0-to-62-mph time of fewer than three seconds and a top speed of 217.48 mph, the LaFerrari is one of the best performers currently in production.

The LaFerrari is proof that Ferrari can work with hybrid technology, but assuming that it’s going to wake up one day and start dropping the technology on all future Ferraris is taking it a little too far. Ferrari knows that hybrid engines have a future in its company; it’s just that we shouldn’t expect it to happen anytime soon.

Ferrari CEO Amedeo Felisa spoke with Auto Motor und Sport and admitted as much, telling the German paper that while a hybrid successor to the 458 Italia is an "interesting idea," the company still doesn’t see it as a feasible idea unless there’s a "leap forward in battery technology."

Apparently, the biggest concern with using hybrid technology on Ferraris is the cost that comes with it. Felisa pointed out that the LaFerrari’s electrical engineering already costs €60,000 ($82,970 based on current exchange rates), and that doesn’t even count the "technical and financial effort" needed to compensate for the weight added by a hybrid system.

Ferrari can get away using hybrid technology on the LaFerrari because the exclusivity of the supercar , coupled with its astronomical price tag, was enough to justify using it. But "mass produced" supercars like the 458 Italia are a different story. For one, Ferrari can’t risk adding any more weight to the cars and the sheer volume of production is just too expensive to handle. It could probably still work, but the cost of doing so would be to make the cars more expensive to buyers - an option that Ferrari isn’t too keen on taking.

But the technology is there, and Ferrari knows now that using it can dramatically improve the performance of its sports cars. That’s the good news. It’s just not feasible to do at this point in time.

For now, Ferrari’s plan is to continue pushing forward with developing new technology that reduces fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of its vehicles. A combination of mild hybrid technology and turbocharged engines could be used on that end. But as far as the kind of hybrid tech the LaFerrari has, don’t expect Ferrari to start using it on its other models just yet.

Click past the jump to read more about the LaFerrari

Since Ferrari admitted that there was a race-prepped version of the LaFerrari on the way — as if you couldn’t already toss "The Ferrari" on the track as is — the details have started rolling out a little more regularly. Now we have a new juicy bit that comes from the folks over at Top Gear. And this tidbit of info happens to deal with the LaFerrari XX featuring half the cylinders of the road-going version.

This makes perfect sense to us, because in December 2013, we dug up a video of a LaFerrari out testing with what was obviously an F1-derived, turbocharged V-6. Check out the video for yourself and listen to that exhaust note. If you close your eyes while listening, you would think you were hearing a new F1 racer out testing.

Given the fact that Ferrari will not confirm what engine the XX model will use, this can only mean that the engine is still in development or that Ferrari is still testing a few different setups. And according to a "high up" official in Ferrari, the V-6 engine is very much in the running as the powerplant of choice. This engine becomes even more logical when you consider that the XX program is all about lightening the car and making it more precise, rather than raw power and speed, and swapping a small-displacement V-6 in place of that hulking V-12 would likely shed some serious weight.

For now, this all remains speculation and hearsay, but it remains a novel concept that may well become a reality.

Stay tuned for more.

Click past the jump to read more about the LaFerrari XX.

Source: Top Gear

Happy Thursday, friends. We know it can be a slightly somber day for many of the F1 fans out there, but we are here to make your day a little better. It is time for the TopSpeed Podcast .

Not only do we have the return of Mark to our podcast shenanigans, but we have video (after the jump) up and ready to post at the same time as audio. Yay us!

This week’s show returns to our traditional format with the Weekly wheels coming first. I talk about a Buick LaCrosse , Mark discusses the Dodge Durango and Justin tries to mercilessly bash the Acura TL .

Since Mark just got back form the drive of the all-new 2015 Hyundai Genesis we spend a good chunk of time discussing this new luxury performance machine. Afterwards we hit some more traditional news stories that include the first reviews and videos of the Ferrari LaFerrari , upgrades coming to the 2015 Chevrolet SS and the revival of Fisker .

We had a pretty solid Q/A segment that includes stories of our past hooliganisms. how we would love to destroy cars, and we had a question about my GT-R drive.

We finish the show with Own, Drive, Burn and a trio of Batmobiles.

We hope everyone enjoys the show, and as always please send us any comments, questions or Own, Drive, Burn suggestions you have. You can reach us by email at Podcast@TopSpeed.com, you can find us on Twitter @TopSpeedPodcast, or you can just sound off in the comments below.

Don’t forget, we are also now on iTunes.

Happy Thursday everyone. See you next week for EPISODE 010!

Weekly Wheels: Buick LaCrosse, Acura TL, Dodge Durango
Hosts: Christian Moe, Justin Cupler, Mark McNabb

See the video Podcast after the jump.

If you have paid attention to all the new videos and reviews of the new LaFerrari you may have noticed something awkward on the car’s steering wheel. There is a tiny badge that reads "F150." You can see it here in our screengrab from Sport Auto’s LaFerrari video .

The badge itself is to signify the car’s internal code designation, and to pay homage to the cars of Ferrari’s past.

Let us start with the past. The very first true Ferrari supercar of the modern era was the Ferrari F40 . It was name the F40 as the car was built to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the company. Then when its successor arrived, it received the name F50 . Not because it was Ferrari’s 50th birthday, but rather, 50 is bigger than 40. That trend continued again with the Ferrari Enzo , which had a designation of F60. Now when the LaFerrari was first in production, most people simply referred to it as the F70, so where the hell did the F150 come from?

That is a slightly different nod to history. You see, a long time ago, Italy was not a unified country. It wasn’t until 1861, and after much bloodshed, that the Kingdom of Italy became a united constituency. In 2011, Ferrari named its F1 car the F150 to celebrate 150 years of Italian unity. After some legal troubles with Ford over the name, the car became known as the Ferrari 150° Italia . Since the LaFerrari was under development at a similar time, it seems very obvious why Ferrari chose the "F150" code for the car.

You learn something new every day, eh?

Click past the jump to read a little more about the Ferrari LaFerrari

By now, we’ve come to learn a lot about Ferrari’s priced beauty, the beast incarnate known as the Ferrari LaFerrari (read: "The Ferrari"). But even though we’ve read our fair share of textual reviews of the ultimate Ferrari, it doesn’t hurt to watch and listen to what Autocar and Evo think about the supercar while behind the wheel.

From what I can make of it, the LaFerrari received enormous praise until,its cup runneth over. (Autocar’s" review is by far my favorite, as the build up to the drive is organic and you can see the fear/excitement in the reviewer’s eyes. What’s more, he then proceeds to get things a little drifty, as he shows just how well the LaFerrari twirks in the twist. Not too bad for a nearly 1,000-horsepower supercar, huh?

Keep it here to see all the videos as they are released.

One more video after the jump.

Well here it is folks, the first video footage from a third party of the Ferrari LaFerrari running around Fiorano in the hands of a journalist.

There are two things to take immediate notice of. One: this thing is incredibly fast. Two: it is easily one of the best sounding Ferraris of all time. This Ferrari makes use of a hybrid drivetrain that features a 6.3-liter V-12 and a pair of electric motors to produce almost 1,000 horsepower. Just like its peers, the Porsche 918 and the McLaren P1 , there is absolutely no indication that this thing is running on electricity and petrol simultaneously. All we hear is pure, unadulterated V-12 anger.

Aside from the noise, the video gives a good bit of footage of the interior, and the active rear wing in action. We even get a bit of sideways hoonage. If you wanted details, info or specs, you need to look elsewhere. There is no noise in the video except what comes from the Ferrari, and we think that may be for a very good reason.

Now you may remember that we ran a story about a potential $70,000 fine that comes with leaking information about the LaFerrari early. You may have also noticed that this video has been released just hours before the embargo is lifted.

Now, a couple of things may have happened here. First, Sport Auto may have taken a calculated risk and assumed the pure income from the YouTube video may be enough to offset the fee. Second, as there is not a single word uttered about the car in this video, the lawyers at Sport Auto may have found a loophole around Ferrari’s restrictions.

Either way, we win, as we get crisp automotive pornography and it didn’t cost any of us a dime.

Updated 4/30/2014: Looks like Auto Sport released the video and then got cold feet, as it was pulled down shortly after we broke the story. There is a new video, however, and we posted it after the jump.


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