1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

The newest Ferrari in the Sherman Wolf estate that is up for auction at Pebble Beach on August 18th and 19th, 2012 is this 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO. The 288 GTO saw very limited production, as its models were only produced to allow homologation into FIA Group B Series. To get into this series, Ferrari had to build at least 200 models, but went a little further and created 272 examples.

FIA canceled the series, which resulted in the 288 GTO becoming a road car that was sold to the public. This 288 GTO example only has two previous owners, Wolf and Ronald Stern, and boasts just 6,000 miles. The body is coated in a bright red that looks like it just rolled off of the showroom floor, though there is no mention of a restoration.

Behind the driver sits a 2.8-liter V-8 engine that boasts a pair of IHI turbochargers and Weber-Mareli fuel injection. This engine pumps out 395 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 366 pound-feet of torque at 3,800 rpm. From 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph), the 288 GTO takes only 4.8 seconds. Add on an additional 4.4 seconds and you are at 160 km/h (100 mph). It runs the 1/4-mile in just 12.7 seconds and has a top speed of 305 km/h (190 mph).

On the front and rear, you get independent double-wishbone suspensions with coil springs. In addition, you also get 225/50R16 high-performance tires on the front, 255/50R16 tires on the rear, and vented disc brakes all the way around.

Gooding & Company expects this Ferrari to pull in between $750,000 and $900,000 at auction.

Click past the jump to read the full press release.

Press Release

Gooding & Company announces the distinguished Sherman M. Wolf Ferrari Collection for its Pebble Beach Auctions

Ferrari 288 GTO

SANTA MONICA, Calif. (July 19, 2012) – Gooding & Company, the acclaimed auction house celebrated for selling the world’s most significant and valuable collector cars, is proud to announce that it
will present the extraordinary Ferrari collection of Sherman M. Wolf at its Pebble Beach Auctions on August 18 & 19. The renowned Sherman M. Wolf Collection is comprised of a rare, alloy-bodied 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione, a 1953 Ferrari 340 MM Spider, a 1957 Ferrari 500 TRC and a 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO, four exceptional and important Ferraris that the prominent and beloved collector worked hard to acquire and maintain throughout his life.

“Sherman Wolf was one of the most earnest and generous Ferrari enthusiasts I’ve ever known and he is dearly missed by many friends in the collecting community,” says David Gooding, President and founder
of Gooding & Company. “We are honored to offer his stunning collection for the next generation to continue his legacy of passion and admiration for these extraordinary Ferraris.”

A lifelong Ferrari devotee who passed away earlier this year, Sherman Wolf was revered and loved by his friends in the car community for his enthusiasm and dedication to the hobby. He had a passion for collecting and repairing antique radios, clocks and cars, driven by his natural engineering talents and business innovation with two-way radios. When it came to cars, he was often the enthusiastic participant
in road rallies – such as the Mille Miglia, Colorado Grand and Tour Auto – who helped repair other drivers’ cars out of good will.

The Ferraris of Sherman M. Wolf

1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Alloy California Spider Competizione (Chassis 1639 GT)

Ferrari’s California Spider is widely recognized as one of the greatest sports cars of all time and thus an important inclusion in any premier post-war collection. This 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Alloy California
Spider, chassis 1639 GT, is one of only nine alloy-bodied LWB California Spiders ever built and with ultra-desirable covered headlights and full race specifications, this beautiful sports car is even more rare. When new, this car was delivered to the prestigious Illinois-based Ferrari dealer and racer George Reed and displayed at the 1960 Chicago Auto Show. In the late 1970s, Sherman Wolf purchased the California Spider, a significant acquisition for the first-time Ferrari owner who later drove it on the inaugural
Colorado Grand. In addition to its lightweight alloy body, it is equipped with full competition specifications including an outside plug motor with TR heads, disc brakes, velocity stacks and a ribbed
gearbox. Restored by Ferrari specialist David Carte, this alloy-bodied California Spider remains in show condition and is among the most desirable 250 Ferraris in existence. Its estimate is $7–$9 million.

1953 Ferrari 340 MM Competition Spider by Vignale (Chassis 0350 AM)

The 340 MM was the ultimate variant of the 340 series, which began in 1950 with the 340 America. A rare Ferrari indeed, Sherman Wolf’s 0350 AM is the last of ten 340 MMs as well as the last of five 340
MM Spiders bodied by Vignale. This car was sold new, in a two-tone American racing scheme, to Sterling Edwards, a famous California sportsman and chairman of the Pebble Beach Road Races Committee. After picking up the car in Italy while on his honeymoon, Edwards returned to the US and raced it throughout 1953 and 1954, winning at Pebble Beach, Palm Springs, Stead AFB and Seafair. In
1955, Los Angeles race car driver Tom Bamford purchased the 340 MM, which he drove in local races through 1955. Sherman Wolf gained ownership of the Ferrari in 1984 and enjoyed taking it on longdistance tours, including the Mille Miglia Storica and Colorado Grand. Gooding & Company is offering the 340 MM at auction with its unrestored, matching-numbers engine. Its estimate is $4.5–$6.5 million.

1957 Ferrari 500 TRC by Scaglietti (Chassis 0662 MDTR)

Ferrari’s 500 TRC is widely recognized as one of the most beautiful Ferrari sports racing cars ever built. One of nineteen 500 TRC’s built, this 1957 example was delivered new to sports racing pioneer John von Neumann. Von Neumann raced it briefly before he sold the car to Dr. Frank Becker of Washington, who competed with the 500 TRC successfully throughout the US in the 1950s. Eventually the Ferrari was sold to Thor Thorson and then Sherman Wolf, who has since owned it for 20 years. A Monterey Historics and Colorado Grand participant, this rare, matching-numbers vintage racer remains an exquisite example of one of Ferrari’s most celebrated race cars. Its estimate is $3.75–$4.5 million.

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO (Chassis 52469)

Ferrari 288 GTO

Designed by Pininfarina and coachbuilt by Scaglietti, the 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO being offered was first sold to Ferrari collector Ronald Stern of London just before Sherman Wolf acquired it the same year. Only 272 examples of Ferrari’s first limited-production supercar were built, and this 288 GTO is a US Federalized example equipped with its original books and tools, as well as air-conditioning and power
windows, which were the only options available at the time. With just 6,000 miles from new, Sherman Wolf’s original, two-owner 288 GTO has an estimate of $750,000–$900,000.

Gooding & Company’s 2012 Pebble Beach Auctions will take place on Saturday and Sunday, August 18 & 19 at the Pebble Beach Equestrian Center, located at the corner of Portola Road and Stevenson Drive. Preview days will start on Wednesday, August 15, and continue through Sunday, August 19. The auctions will commence at 5:00 p.m. on Saturday and 6:00 p.m. on Sunday. Gooding & Company’s Pebble Beach Auctions catalogues are available for $100 and admit two to the viewing and the auctions. General admission tickets to the viewing and auctions may be purchased on site for $40. Auctions are broadcast live from Gooding & Company’s website. Bidder registration forms, press credentials and additional auction information are also available on http://www.goodingco.com or by calling (310) 899-1960. For additional vehicle information and up-to-the-minute results, follow Gooding & Company on Facebook
and Twitter @GoodingCompany.

About Gooding & Company

Gooding & Company, internationally celebrated for its world-class automotive auctions, provides unparalleled service in the collector car market, offering a wide range of services including private and
estate sales, appraisals and collection management. In the past two years, Gooding & Company has realized the most prestigious automotive records in the world for a Car Sold at Auction with the iconic 1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa Prototype at $16.39 million and for an American Car at Auction with the 1931 Whittell Coupe Duesenberg Model J at $10.34 million. The auction house has realized extraordinary results thus far in 2012 at its annual Scottsdale Auctions in January with more than $39.8 million in sales and 98% sold, and its annual Amelia Island Auction in March with more than $36 million in sales and 91% sold. Renowned for its annual standing as the official auction house for the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, Gooding & Company will return to Pebble Beach, California on August 18 & 19, 2012.


6 comments:

1953 Ferrari 340 MM Competition Vignale Spider will catch people’s attention upon seeing this car. Though 1953 is quite a long time, It’s really an amazing thing to know that the owner preserved this model and make it look like new.

It’s funny how people look up these kinds of model. 1985 model is quite classic. But the style reminds us that we should take this kind of model carefully.

Even if this is a 1985 car model, the style is astonishing and the mags also great. Plus the red color is good.

This Ferrari 288 GTO will have many bidders. This car surely has some unique features that’s why many bidders will bid to this car.

I still don’t approve of its looks, but I’ll give this 1985 model a credit since it lasted more than decades.

Why all the old Ferrari model is scattered on this site?

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