2013 Ferrari F12berlinetta by Cam Shaft

Cam Shaft has, on occasion, given a car a comprehensive aftermarket program. But sometimes, it sticks to what it knows best.

Take, for example, this Ferrari F12berlinetta . Off the bat, we’ll tell you that it doesn’t come with any performance upgrades so you can expect to see the same 740-horsepower V-12 engine that allows the car to hit 60 mph in just 3.1 seconds, while reaching a top speed of 211 mph.

But the German tuner does know one thing more than anybody else: wrapping cars. So that’s what they did to the F12berlinetta, and the results are positively glorious.

It’s always convenient to put a tuner to task for not flexing its performance muscles on a car like the F12berlinetta. In some cases, that argument holds merit. Other times, though, it doesn’t.

This one belongs in the latter because one look at the Italian supercar and you immediately forget everything else that makes sense in this world. You just drop your jaw, pick it back up and admire this prancing horse in all of its glory.

Click past the jump to read about what Cam Shaft did to the Ferrari F12berlinetta

Matte Love

Ferrari F12berlinetta by Cam Shaft

This isn’t the most comprehensive of Cam Shaft’s works, but rest assured, when the car wrap involves matte materials, we’re on board.

In this case, the F12berlinetta was treated to a complete foliation in a Titanium Matte Metallic finish. The whole car - front to back - was covered in the visually stunning finish that no part of the original color can be seen.

And all for the cost of €3,100, which is about $4,000 based on current exchange rates.

Powder Coating

Ferrari F12berlinetta by Cam Shaft

The only other upgrade on this program was the work done on the F12berlinetta’s original wheels. Sure, they all stayed the same, but to give it a more unified look with the new body color, Cam Shaft took the wheels and powder coated them in matte metallic gray. That’s a service that can be done for just €800, which is about $1,050 based on current exchange rates.


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