Ferrari

Ferrari cars

Although it was launched about two years ago, the outrageously powerful Ferrari F12berlinetta has never posted an official Nurburgring lap time. That might come to an end soon, according to TouriClips, which just released a video showing what appears to be an F12berlinetta lapping the ’Ring with some measuring equipment on board.

The source claims the Italians showed up for testing at the German course and had the "Green Hell" to themselves for about half an hour, just enough to post a quick lap. TouriClips claims to have timed the F12berlinetta at 7:48 minutes, which, due to his positioning on the track, includes about 40 seconds of cool down time the Ferrari took between the T13 and Hatzenbach sections of the Nordschleife.

Simple mathematics suggest the F12berlinetta completed a full lap of the ’Ring in only 7:08 minutes, which would put it on par with the Nissan GT-R Nismo . As impressive as it may sound, TouriClips’ timing leaves room for a lot of error and we suggest you take the said benchmark with a grain of salt. Should Ferrari post on an official lap for the F12berlinetta, we’ll be right back to report it.

Meanwhile, the Enzo remains the fastest Ferrari-badged production car to lap the "Green Hell". The supercar achieved its benchmark in 2008, when Marc Basseng completed a lap in 7:25.7. As far as non-road-legal Ferraris are concerned, the 599XX needed only 6:58.16 minutes to lap the ’Ring in 2010.

Although the F12berlinetta’s presence on the Nordschleife is still a mystery, the video is definitely worth a watch. Be sure to pump up the volume, there’s a 6.3-liter V-12 waiting to pierce your eardrums.

There’s been a lot of commotion around Ferrari ’s decision to turbocharge the California , one that created a new breach into the company’s naturally aspirated habits. If you’re among those that got a little upset over the forced induction treatment received by the California, despite huge torque gains, then you’d better buckle up because the Italians are planning yet another switch.

According to CAR, who got its ears on some precious info circulating around Maranello, the 458 Italia is the next Ferrari to benefit from turbocharging. Specifically, Ferrari engineers are no longer looking to squeeze more power from the familiar 4.5-liter V-8 unit, but replace it altogether with the 3.8-liter powerplant that debuted in the California T . Of course, the mid-engined Prancing Horse will receive more than just the 560 ponies powering the latter.

Word has it the next 458 Italia - reportedly dubbed the M458-T — will pack as much as 670 bhp (680 horsepower), meaning the Italians are trying to regain the precious crown they lost right after McLaren unleashed the staggering 650S . Since adding more than 100 ponies to twin-turbo powerplant via boost pressure shouldn’t be a problem for the sharp-witted folks at Maranello, we expect the upgraded sports car to be a lot faster than the current model, with the 0-to-60 benchmark to drop from 3.4 seconds to the high two-second area.

The M458-T will also benefit from the company’s latest developments in terms of technology, CAR adds without revealing any specific details, but expect some fuel-saving and turbo lag-eliminating tricks.

Scheduled to break cover in 2015, the turbocharged 458 must be undergoing extensive testing as we speak. With that in mind, it’s very likely that the mule our spy photographers spotted earlier this year had a force-inducing unit under its rear glass. Hopefully, we’ll find out more about that soon enough.

Updated 08/26/2014: A fresh set of spy photos of the Ferrari M458-T have made their way into our inbox. Check them out by clicking on the gallery! The M458-T is expected to be unveiled in March 2015 at the Geneva Motor Show.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Ferrari M458-T.

Source: CAR

Someone’s being a little sneaky with a certain 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO that one Ferrari expert has called out as a replica. You might remember that 250 GTO that popped up on Mobile.de a few weeks ago and came with a price tag of $64 million . The car received worldwide coverage because 1), it’s a Ferrari 250 GTO and 2), it costs $64 freakin’ million!

But Marcel Massini, regarded as the world’s leading Ferrari historian, is calling BS on the $64-million 250 GTO. "It’s a replica," Massini told. "I can tell you that with 100 percent certainty. I know where all of these cars are today. And this is not one of the original GTOs."

That part about knowing where all 39 250 GTOs are is apparently what separates Massini from the other Ferrari experts out there. Not only does he know where each one is, but he has photos and detailed histories of them. All 39 of them.

Massini also pointed out the car’s rather astronomical price tag as an indication that it’s fake, saying that anybody who owns a 250 GTO will use different methods to sell a car that’s expensive and incredibly rare. In short, posting it on a website isn’t one of them.

I personally have had no business dealings with Mobile.de so its hard to tell if they themselves were duped into selling a replica. The site has yet to issue any comments on Massini’s allegations, but it’s hard to go against someone who most agree is the authority on Ferrari’s history.

Updated 05/08/2014 @ 12:00 p.m.: Apparently the Ferrari expert was right, as the ad has been removed from mobile.de.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GTO.

Source: CNBC
Posted on by Nico DeMattia  

Ferrari is constantly on the forefront of automotive technology and setting the bar for the rest of the car world. For instance, with the Ferrari FF , the Italian automaker wanted a four-wheel-drive system but conventional systems weren’t good enough so its engineers completely reinvented the wheel and came up with their own. Was it necessary? No, probably not, but stagnation is self-abdication. At least that’s what Ferrari would say. Well Ferrari has done it again, at least it’s trying to. To Ferrari, a conventional electric power steering system just isn’t good enough. Even though any enthusiast lucky enough to drive a 458 Speciale would tell you that the steering is nothing short of perfect, Ferrari isn’t satisfied. Ferrari says that due to slack in the steering box and universal joints creating a slight delay between the driver’s input and what the wheels actually do, the wizards in Maranello are developing a software system that compensates for this and creates a more direct and accurate response. It, supposedly, can also compensate for the front suspension geometry differences, from left to right, which can create a miniscule difference in steering response respectively.

Now this is all well and good, but if Ferrari really wanted precise, accurate steering, why not just go back to hydraulic? Aren’t old school Ferraris, Porsches and BMWs world famous for their telepathic steering feel and response? I know, electric power steering is more efficient and with strict fuel-economy regulations, it makes more sense. But, what about no power steering at all? Ferrari’s baby brother, Alfa Romeo , doesn’t use power steering in its new 4C, and people love it.

Thankfully, Ferrari says that this new software tweak is simple and cheap, and the driver will never notice it working, they will only feel great steering. I understand Ferrari’s need to push the envelope but I feel this is just too much. Added software manipulation cannot be good for the already fading steering feel in sports cars nowadays.

Click past the jump to read more about Ferrari’s future steering system.

Source: EVO

Have you ever wondered what a "winner-stays-on" drag race among the fastest supercars in the world would look like? I’ve been asking the same question too. Then this video created by the SCD TV showed up and well, I finally had a small sample of the answer I was looking for. SCD TV staged a series of drag races featuring some of the world’s finest exotics to find out which among them is the quickest to a quarter mile. The rules were pretty simple: two cars line up and race and the winner moves on and faces another challenger until somebody defeats the incumbent. The process repeats until a winner is eventually crowned. Sounds pretty simple, right?

SCD TV made even more interesting by fielding some pretty gnarly exotics, including a Ford GT 720 Mirage , a Ferrari F40 , a 9ff-tuned Porsche 911 , a McLaren 12C , a Lamborghini Aventador , and a McLaren P1 .

What’s important is I saw what I’ve been wanting to see for a long time and that’s more than enough for me.

Maybe next time we all get to see more supercars in this battle. Just a thought.

There was a time when Ferrari dominated sports car racing . It happened until about 50 years ago, right before Ford had introduced the Le Mans-winning GT40 and Porsche dominated the tracks with the iconic 917 . Two years after the latter began dominating endurance events, Ferrari had abandoned sports car racing to focus on Formula One. It was 1973, and the Ferrari 312PB had retired as the company’s last prototype racer.

Although eclipsed by many racers of the day, the 312PB managed to achieve 15 wins in 72 events. Powered by a flat-12 engine based on the 3.0-liter Formula One unit, the Italian sports car made a name for itself by winning prestigious events. Its trophy case includes the 1000km Buenos Aires, Daytona 6 Hours, Sebring 12 Hours, 1000km Nurburgring , and the Targa Florio, among others. The list of drivers that hopped in its cockpit is equally impressive and features the likes of Jacky Ickx, Brian Redman, Ronnie Peterson and Mario Andretti. That’s a lineup full of skilled and race-winning aces right there.

Sure, it’s not the most beautiful Ferrari ever built, but the 312PB was not conceived to win beauty contests. It’s main goal was to win races and, for the most part, it succeeded. It was renowned for its precise handling and quickly became a crowd pleaser due to its piercing exhaust note. Thankfully enough, some of the few 312PBs ever built have been stored and maintained for the past 40 years, so we can see and hear them race once again. Thanks to Petrolicious and Steven Read, we can do that at the push of button. Just hit play and don’t be shy with the volume, you’re in for a real treat.

There are only so many superlatives you can throw in the direction of the Ferrari 250 GTO . To this day, it’s still considered as the quintessential Ferrari . More importantly, the 250 GTO is also revered as one of the greatest cars of all time. The 250 GTO is treated with such high reverence that the car usually fetches millions on the auction block. We’ve seen a 250 GTO LWB California Spider Competizione fetch $11 million. Before that, a 250 LM scooped up $14.3 million. And before we forget, a pair of 250 GTOs have been sold for $32 million and $52 million, respectively. Here’s the takeaway: if you own a Ferrari 250 GTO, you’re in possession of a car that can net you at least $30 million. There is no shortage of people willing to spend that amount, maybe even double that, to own a piece of Ferrari history. That being said, a 1962 250 GTO has found itself on Mobile.de, considered as Germany’s biggest online marketplace. It’s a legitimate site that has seen its share of million-dollar transactions so there’s little reason to suggest that this isn’t an authentic 250 GTO.

Its seller, GT Golden Tower Real Estate and Luxury Gmbh, indicates that this red 250 GTO has traveled 15,000 kilometers (9,320 miles), which means that its owner has made relatively good use of it. But the car still looks to be in great shape. One photo even shows the car’s V-12 engine to be in immaculate shape. The interior also looks polished and show quality.

Everything about this 1962 250 GTO looks to be in order. Well, almost everything. See, GT Golden Tower thinks this 250 GTO can sell for €47.6 million, which is about $64 million based on current exchange rates on 7/29/2014.

That’s a lot of money, but as history has shown, it’s not an absurd figure for a Ferrari 250 GTO.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 250 GTO.

Source: Mobile

If you thought the new era of F1 with small, hybrid, turbocharged cars was a bad idea, listen up. Not only have Mercedes and Audi revealed new engines and cars that are using an electrified turbo system similar in function to the new F1 cars, Ferrari has jumped into the mix now too. According to a new report from 4 Wheel News, Ferrari is working on a new engine that features both a supercharger and an electronic turbo.

Now if you are a Ferrari purist, please put down the gun/torch/big stick and listen. The report clearly states that Ferrari’s high-end, V-12 cars will remain, and that the V-12 engines powering them will also remain naturally aspirated.

The supercharger will help provide lots of power with a small footprint, and the instant torque and boost from the electric turbocharger will reduce lag in the forced-induction system and help cut emissions and increase fuel economy.

We don’t have any information on what size or configuration the engine will come in, but considering the main goal of this engine is to cut emissions, I wouldn’t be surprised to see smaller V-8. A de-bored version of the California T’s 3.8-liter down to 3.6-liter wouldn’t be improbable. Ferrari could also go for a V-6 configuration. Whatever it chooses, expect power outputs to still be well above the 500-horsepower mark.

It is still a Ferrari after all.

Click past the jump to read more about Ferrari’s future supercharged engine.

Source: 4wheelsnews

Cross-brand marketing is about as sure as it gets when it comes to hitting two birds with one stone. It becomes even more important when you have two brands that fall on different market segments. That’s the case with the recent collaboration between Ferrari and Oakley, and the release of the Ferrari-branded Oakley sunglass line.

We’re all familiar with Ferrari and Oakley, and both brands are household names. But the difference between the two is the disparately different market that each one caters to. One has products specifically for the super rich and the other is geared towards youth and adventure.

But here’s the thing; the two are so famous independent of each other that a collaboration stands to benefit both companies. The sunglasses themselves look awesome with the supercar builder’s badge prominently displayed on them. And its not like these sunglasses are of the cereal box variety, as Oakley’s some of the best in the business and Ferrari is Ferrari.

I personally have been a loyal customer of Oakley for the past 12 years, so you better believe I’m scooping a pair up as soon as I can. Likewise, I’m confident that a lot of you will be eyeing a pair, too, even if it means keeping the purchase on the down-low lest you want to be subjected to the objections of your significant other.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari Scuderia Sunglasses By Oakley.

In 1962, Ferrari made a huge leap forward by releasing the 250 GTO ; a GT car produced for homologation into FIA’s Group 3 Grand Touring Car class. The 250 GTO went on to win the over 2.0-liter class of the International Championship for GT Manufacturers for three straight years from 1962 through 1964, becoming one of the last front-engined racers to remain competitive at the top level of sports car racing. As the two-seater berlinetta retired, Ferrari built the 275 GTB/C Speciale, a lighter sports car based on the already-iconic 250 GTO.

Designed by Sergio Scaglietti, the same man that penned the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB/C got a 3.3-liter, V-12 engine under its hood, as opposed to the 3.0-liter plant fitted in its predecessor. Output was increased to 320 horsepower, which, coupled with the lowered weight, promised to deliver outstanding performance on the track. Unfortunately, Ferrari failed to homologate the 275 for the GT class, as the car submitted was considerably lighter than the dry weight stated for the road-going version.

Ferrari and FIA would reach a compromise by June 1965, enabling only one of the three 275 GTB/Cs built to compete for the remainder of the season. Although its career didn’t span for more than a few months, the Speciale proved its potency at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, where it finished third and scored the best finish by a front-engined car. Its record still stands to this day. Granted, the 275 GTB/C is not as successful as the 250 GTO or the 250 LM, however, its limited production run and bespoke character places it among the most desirable Ferrari race cars ever built.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti.

Source: RM Aucions

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