Ferrari

Ferrari cars

RM Auctions is one of the biggest auto auction houses in the world. It’s been home to some of the biggest auction buys in recent memory, including a 1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Scaglietti Spider that sold for $6.4 million back in 2012. For 2014, RM Auctions is set to open shop in London where a number of classic exotics will be up for bid to the highest bidder.

EVO managed to get a guided tour of RM Auctions’ storage facility where Harry Metcalfe joined the team to talk shop about some of the cars that are expected to get a lot of attention at the sale.

As expected, the facility contains some of the rarest and most beautiful metal, carbon fiber and aluminum in the world. EVO and Metcalfe zeroed in on a few of them, including a rare 1986 Ferrari Testarossa and a 1990 Lamborghini Countach . These two cars are widely considered as the "poster exotics" of the 1980s, and seeing them in the same auction is a real blast back to the decade of teased hair and leather pants for myself.

The guided tour also included short discussions about the 1993 Jaguar XJ220 , the 1959 Facel Vega HK500 Coupe , and the 1973 Alpine-Renault A110 1300 V85 .

There are many more cars that EVO and Metcalfe discuss in this 32-minute episode. I won’t run the risk of spoiling all the models, as having an authority like Metcalfe give you a little history lesson about them trumps my ramblings about them here.

There’s been a lot of talk about Ferrari’s rumored plans to introduce a V-6-powered, entry-level sports car in the near future. It may sound awkward given the company’s tradition with V-8 and V-12 powerplants, but the Italians have done this before. It happened between 1968 and 1976, when Ferrari launched the Dino marque for models powered by engines with fewer than 12 cylinders. Once called the "lesser Ferraris," the Dinos carried 2.0- and 2.4-liter, V-6 units, as well as a 3.0-liter V-8 under their rear bonnets. The most iconic Dino was the 246 GTS , but the 308 GT4 received some attention as well.

Produced for eight years — four with a Dino badge and four as a Ferrari — the 308 GT4 featured a 2+2 coupe body and a wedge design penned by Bertone. The 3.0-liter eight-banger generated 250 horsepower at launch, but the engine lost 20 ponies when it crossed the pond to America due to slight modifications. Weighing in at about 2,500 pounds, the 308 GT4 wasn’t astoundingly fast, but it was quick enough for Elvis Presley to buy one. It’s actually one of the last car he purchased nearly a year before passing away in 1977.

40 years have passed since its official launch, and the 308 GT4 is finally getting the love it deserves from Ferrari aficionados as the company’s first production car to feature a mid-mounted, V-8 engine. Hit the play button above to watch a happy owner talk about his 1975 Dino-badged sports car in an enchanting Gear Patrol video .

Chris Harris has done it again. He has found the ultimate classic car to test drive that makes us drool. This time around, Harris gets some time behind the wheel of the Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France . No, this isn’t some pace car used to lead segments of the famed bicycle race. Rather, this classic racer was once a long-distance race car that tackled asphalt and dirt roads with authority in the Tour de France Automobile.

Under the hood is a 3.0-liter, 12-cylinder engine that produced 240 horsepower in its racing days, but closer to 270 horses after modern modifications were made. That isn’t much power by today’s standards, but back in the 1950s, when this car did its racing, that was a ton of power.

Also unimpressive by today’s standards is this car’s 165-mph top speed. But picture hitting this top speed on a dirt road with 1950’s tires and four-wheel drum brakes, and you can see why only a brave few could actually pilot this rig.

The blue beauty in this video is set to head to auction soon, but the current owner was kind enough to allow Harris to pilot it. And as always, he delivers to us a great review with plenty of classic 12-pot noise to satisfy the ears. Is it simply spectacular to hear that small-displacement 12-cylinder hum along.

When somebody brought up a statement like Ferrari using V-6 engines , they’d probably be met with either bewilderment, hysterical laughter, or maybe a combination of both. But times have changed in the auto industry and no more is that evident than a recent report indicating that Maranello is seriously contemplating a V-6-powered entry-level super car.

Sources told Car Magazine that Ferrari is currently developing a 2.9-liter twin-turbo V-6 engine that will be used for future sports cars, specifically a more affordable version of the 458 Italia , considered as the incumbent “mainstream” super car. Details behind the planned engine are still being kept under wraps, but there’s reason to believe that somewhere in the neighborhood of 500 horsepower and 450 pound-feet of torque is achievable.

The rumored V-6 super car isn’t so much an admission from Ferrari that it wants to start catering to mass market consumers. Instead, it could be the next step in the company’s efforts to offer more sustainable products that can adhere to emissions regulations now and in the future.

A V-6-powered Ferrari that people can somewhat afford is definitely an interesting proposition if you think about it. Such a scenario would’ve been impossible in the past.

But times are definitely changing and we could be looking at the Prancing Horse beginning its evolution in front of our eyes.

Note: Photo is of the Ferrari 458 Italia

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 458 Italia

Source: CAR Magazine

The turbocharged California T came as a big surprise in early 2014, but it appears Ferrari aims to add forced induction to all of its V-8-powered sports cars . Concerned about both fuel economy and safe ways to increase output, the Italians are testing a turbocharged version of the Ferrari 458 as we speak. While rumors about a force-fed 458 surfaced in early 2014 when a white mule was spotted playing in the snow, a new batch of spy shots featuring a camouflaged sports car comes to confirm the turbo 458 is well underway.

Reportedly dubbed M458-T , the new iteration of the company’s entry-level sports car is expected to see significant gains in terms of horsepower. Specifically, the turbocharger attached to the new V-8 unit is likely to push output to around 670 ponies, a 74-horsepower addition to the 596 ponies available with the 458 Speciale. Of course, more power means an updated cooling system and revised aerodynamics as well, with minor design changes to further mark the introduction of the first turbocharged 458.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 458 M

Chris Harris spends time in some pretty flashy cars in the name of his profession, yet he still finds time to take his own cars out for a drive. The difference between normal journalists’ rides and Harris’ is that he actually owns a flashy car. His pick is the beautiful Ferrari FF .

The FF is powered by a 6.2-liter, direct-injected V-12 making a massive 660 horsepower and 503 pound-feet of torque that’s mated to a seven-speed automatic transmission with paddle shifters and delivers power to all four wheels. The combination of power, quick shifting, and all-wheel drive means the FF hits 60 mph in just 3.5 seconds.

While those stats are impressive, none of that seems to matter to Harris as he’s blasting down winding European roads. For him, it’s all about the culmination of all the FF’s parts; the feel, the sound, and the experience. The FF turns what would normally be a boring drive home into an event. “Everything about it makes you feel special,” he says. “It makes you feel not just one cut above the AMGs and the Ms, but three cuts above. And I love that.”

As the passing countryside melts behind the FF, Harris continues by saying, “The FF really makes the driver feel special at all speeds — and that’s the thing that’s surprised me in my five months and six thousand miles so far in this car."

After ending his rave of the FF’s interior accoutrements, he finishes by saying, “It just brightens my day. And what price do you put on that? … about $2400* a month, actually.”

We find his humor rather entertaining.

*Harris actually quotes 1500 pounds a month.

Known as the most successful manufacturer ever to race in Formula One , Ferrari is also famous for its glorious sports car racing years. The Italians gathered no less than nine outright Le Mans wins and 13 World Sportscar Championships between the late 1940 and the early 1970s, being surpassed by very few companies in that department. Ferrari’s golden age of endurance racing came to a halt in 1974, when Enzo stopped all development of sports cars prototypes in order to focus on Formula One. Maranello lied dormant for nearly two decades until 1994, when the 333 SP, built at the request of amateur racer Giampiero Moretti, hit the track marking the brand’s return to sports prototype racing.

Designed by famed Italian chassis manufacturer Dallara, the 333 SP was offered to privateers who raced it with great success until 2003. The open-top race car not only managed to give Ferrari a triumphant return to sports car racing, it also became the only Ferrari to win the 24 Hours of Daytona and the 12 Hours of Sebring.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 333 SP

Introduced in 1953, the Ferrari 250 quickly became the company’s most successful vehicle lineup. It included everything from road-legal grand tourers to the 250 Testa Rossa and 250 LM race cars. More importantly, the range spawned the iconic 250 GTO, currently the most expensive Ferrari ever auctioned (as of August 20, 2014). The 250 line came to an end in 1964, when it was replaced by two distinct families, the 275 and 330. While the 275 GTB/C stepped in to substitute the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB/4 took center stage as Ferrari’s new flagship model.

Introduced at the 1966 Paris Motor Show , the GTB/4 quickly became popular with sports car enthusiasts and celebrities, especially in the United States. Even Hollywood actor and motoring icon Steven McQueen ordered one of the V-12-powered grand tourers, receiving it on the set of the "Bullitt" movie. McQueens example became the most expensive GTB/4 ever auctioned in 2014, when it crossed the block for $10 million. Because of this huge auction sum, we decided to have a closer look at this enticing, berlinetta-bodied Ferrari.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

We’ve known about the 458 Speciale Spider — or whatever it name ends up being — since June 2014, and we all know that it’ll essentially be mechanically identical to its coupe sibling. This means that it’ll carry a 4.5-liter, V-8 engine with 605 cv (596 ponies) and 398 pound-feet of torque. This should translate to a 0-to-60-mph time in the low-three-second range. What we didn’t know, until today, is just how limited it will be.

According to 4WheelsNews, the 458 Special Spider will be limited to exactly 458 units. The website does not list a source, other than the typical "insider," so a grain of salt may be in order.

Other details that 4WheelsNews learned while talking to a "friend" who attended a special unveiling of the Spider include some styling variations between this and the coupe model. The main variances of note are the different stripes that come on the Spider model and two new wheel options. Like the report of the number of units, the source is an unnamed "friend," so this could end up not being the case.

We should learn all the juicy details soon, as we expect to see the 458 Speciale Spider in the flesh at the 2014 Paris Motor Show in October.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 458 Speciale

Source: 4WheelsNews
Posted on by Nico DeMattia  

Chris Harris is back again, making me jealous of his life. He recently spent some time in Maranello, testing the new Ferrari LaFerrari . The LaFerrari, despite having a silly name, is the hardcore, hybrid successor to the famous Enzo. It’s also the Italian answer to the Porsche 918 and the McLaren P1 . It’s also probably the most brutally fast hybrid production car ever made.

Chris got to test each of those aforementioned hybrid supercars and had nothing but great things to say about them. However, he seems to feel a bit different about this LaFerrari. It seems to be the only one of the three he actually loved. The reason for that is probably the fact that the LaFerrari hides it’s techno-wonder more than the others. The Porsche 918 is a unashamed nerd-fest (a very cool, very fast nerd-fest), and the McLaren is all business with its very serious, designed-in-a-wind-tunnel looks. The LaFerrari, on the other hand, is typical Italian pantomime and theater, it’s a celebration of colors and noise. I personally think it looks fantastic, I especially like the bug-antenna-style wing mirrors. It looks like a proper Ferrari, not just an exercise in aerodynamics and numbers. They each have their own character but the LaFerrari seems to have the most interesting one.

Combine all of this power, performance, handling prowess and looks, and you have possibly the greatest supercar the world has ever seen. Now go watch Mr. Harris give it "the full potatoes!".


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