Ferrari

Ferrari cars

What comes after hump-day? The TopSpeed Podcast , of course!

Happy Thursday everybody, and welcome to EPISODE 010! of the TopSpeed Podcast. This week is special for a few reasons aside from our milestone number. Firstly, Justin is gone on vacation, so we brought in a special guest, Logan Utsman. Logan is an old friend and colleague of Mark and myself, and he is a proper hoon to boot. We hope you enjoy hearing him.

If you hated him, let us know that too. We will be sure to have him drawn and quartered for offending the masses.

Secondly we have a hybrid video podcast that has photos in it too. The first part is great news, the second part is less so. Thanks to some shaky internet, my recording PC dropped the video feed about halfway through. I filled the rest of the podcast with some photos from my personal portfolio to provide some visual entertainment. You can see the video after the break.

As for the show, our Weekly Wheels features a return of the Lexus ES 350 , a look at the Audi A3 TDI , and I discuss my time flogging some new Cooper Tires on a track with the Ford Mustang and BMW 3 Series .

News coverage includes a thorough look at Chrysler’s big five-year plan , what it means for SRT , Dodge and Ferrari , plus the return of the Grand Wagoneer and the official announcement of the Maserati Alfieri . The BMW i3 also makes an appearance in our news segment.

Our Q/A segment features more automotive destruction, a short look at the best lime-green hatchbacks you can buy, the oldest cars we have driven, and we speculate on dream drag races.

As always, we finish with Own, Drive, Burn. This week we have a trio of Ferrari models.

Please let us know if you have any comments, questions or concerns. You can reach us in the comments below, on Twitter @TopSpeedPodcast or by email: Podcast@TopSpeed.com

We are also on iTunes. If you wanted to subscribe, rate or leave us a review we would really appreciate it.

See you next week you crazy kids.

Weekly Wheels: Lexus ES 350, Audi A3 TDI, BMW 328i

Hosts: Christian Moe, Mark McNabb, Logan Utsman

Watch the video version after the break!

Is it possible that we could be seeing a lot more Ferrari models in dealerships in the near future? And by a lot more, we’re not just talking about the usual four or five models that Maranello has at any given point in time. Apparently, Fiat-Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne seems to think that more Ferrari models out on the streets would be an ideal scenario, or at least that’s what he told Autoblog recently.

According to Fiat-Chrysler’s main man, the Italian automaker is planning to launch a new car every year between now and 2018. Do the math and that’s five entirely new models that will be launched in the next five years. Marchionne didn’t dive into the specifics of what models are being prepared, but don’t be surprised if somewhere along the way, a successor to the 458 Italia is one of them.

Looking at the company’s current lineup, the 458, believe it or not, is now the elder statesman of the group. The FF , the F12berlinetta , and the just-launched California T are still relatively new compared to the 458. Once you add the LaFerrari to the mix, that’s five unique models Ferrari currently has in its portfolio.

Now, Marchionne also mentioned that these future models will have a four-year lifecycle and from there, "M" versions will be built, of which another four years will be tacked on to them. What these models are, we still don’t know, but we’re certainly curious as to how Ferrari can pull it off given that it has no plans of exceeding the 7,000-unit cap it has for its models in a given year. There’s talk that the company plans to ramp that up to 10,000 units, but such discussions aren’t expected to be taken seriously for a few more years.

All this, of course, leaves us with a mix of excitement and anxiety regarding Ferrari’s future. Introducing one new model a year is the exciting part, but not knowing what these models are is making us really anxious.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari LaFerrari.

Source: Autoblog

There are literally a handful of cars in the history of the industry that’s revered more than the Ferrari 250 GTO . Really, you can probably count in one hand those models and we’re guessing you’re even going to have a hard time doing it. Such is the level of respect people have of this true classic. Consider how much a 250 GTO fetches in auctions these days. Last November, a variation of the 250 GTO - the 250 LM - sold for $14.3 million . But even that pales in comparison to the incredible $52 million price Connecticut-based collector Paul Pappalardo paid for a 1963 250 GTO. So yeah, unless there’s a DeLorean out there that actually flies, no car today - classic or modern - will even come close to sniffing that record purchase.

So imagine what it must have felt for Petrolicious to get its hands on a 250 GTO. In this video, Derek Hill, the son of former Formula One champion and Ferrari factory driver Phil HIll, managed to acquire a 1964 250 GTO. We can only wonder what it must have felt like to be entrusted with a car that probably has a higher value that the GDP of some countries. But if anybody understood the value of this car, it’s Hill. After all, his father actually raced this exact 250 GTO at the Daytona Continental, which the older Hill ended up winning.

You really can’t understate the rarity of this particular GTO, chassis #5571. It’s actually one of the last GTOs ever built and was also the first of the Series II bodies and it came with a 3.0-liter V-12 engine that produces 300 horsepower.

Not that we’re pining for it to hit any kind of auction in the future, but can you imagine how much it would fetch in a setting like that? It’s not just a 250 GTO; it’s a 250 GTO with a real racing history attached to it.

North of $50 million? We’d be fools not to at least consider it.

It’s been nearly half a year since Ferrari unveiled the 458 Speciale , and the Italians have just launched the sports car’s online configurator, just in time for you to begin a new week with a fun-filled day.

The official configurator enables both potential customers and car fanatics to browse through an array of menus and change everything from the 458 Speciale’s exterior color and livery to interior shades and materials used throughout the cockpit.

Making things more interesting is the 360-degree overview offering both day and night view, as well as the "explore the reflections" option. The latter changes the way light reflects into the paint based on different, adjustable sunlight angles.

What’s more, a "Compare" button positioned on the right will enable you to split the car and configure each half separately for a better comparison between colors, features, and their contrasts.

As a brief reminder before you click past the jump for more details, the Ferrari 458 Speciale is powered by a 4.5-liter V-8 engine that churns out 596 horsepower and 398 pound-feet of torque via a seven-speed F1 dual-clutch transmission. The oomph enables the sport car to sprint from naught to 62 mph in about 3 seconds and onto a top speed of 202 mph.

Nearly 200 pounds lighter than the regular 458, the Speciale is not only the most powerful 458, but also the most track-capable.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 458 Speciale.

Source: Ferrari

The LaFerrari is proof that Ferrari can work with hybrid technology, but assuming that it’s going to wake up one day and start dropping the technology on all future Ferraris is taking it a little too far. Ferrari knows that hybrid engines have a future in its company; it’s just that we shouldn’t expect it to happen anytime soon.

Ferrari CEO Amedeo Felisa spoke with Auto Motor und Sport and admitted as much, telling the German paper that while a hybrid successor to the 458 Italia is an "interesting idea," the company still doesn’t see it as a feasible idea unless there’s a "leap forward in battery technology."

Apparently, the biggest concern with using hybrid technology on Ferraris is the cost that comes with it. Felisa pointed out that the LaFerrari’s electrical engineering already costs €60,000 ($82,970 based on current exchange rates), and that doesn’t even count the "technical and financial effort" needed to compensate for the weight added by a hybrid system.

Ferrari can get away using hybrid technology on the LaFerrari because the exclusivity of the supercar , coupled with its astronomical price tag, was enough to justify using it. But "mass produced" supercars like the 458 Italia are a different story. For one, Ferrari can’t risk adding any more weight to the cars and the sheer volume of production is just too expensive to handle. It could probably still work, but the cost of doing so would be to make the cars more expensive to buyers - an option that Ferrari isn’t too keen on taking.

But the technology is there, and Ferrari knows now that using it can dramatically improve the performance of its sports cars. That’s the good news. It’s just not feasible to do at this point in time.

For now, Ferrari’s plan is to continue pushing forward with developing new technology that reduces fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of its vehicles. A combination of mild hybrid technology and turbocharged engines could be used on that end. But as far as the kind of hybrid tech the LaFerrari has, don’t expect Ferrari to start using it on its other models just yet.

Click past the jump to read more about the LaFerrari

Although we’ve seen plenty of Ferrari 458 Speciale footage since it was launched, we still can’t get enough of this pure Italian sports car , mainly due to its awesome exhaust note.

Getting near one of these beauties is more than difficult, but this is where supercar spotter Marchettino comes in by providing us with videos showing all sorts of rare, high-performance machines.

This isn’t the first 458 Speciale clip he uploaded on YouTube, but this one features not just one, but two such vehicles. Making things even better is the fact that they were shot while lapping the Misano track, the perfect place for a pair of sports cars to show off and put their outstanding technology to good use.

Before we leave you with the video, we’d like to remind you that the Ferrari 458 Speciale is motivated by a noisy, 4.5-liter, V-8 engine that cranks out 596 horsepower and 398 pound-feet of torque. The unit enables the car to scream from 0 to 60 mph in three seconds and reach a top speed of 202 mph.

Since Ferrari admitted that there was a race-prepped version of the LaFerrari on the way — as if you couldn’t already toss "The Ferrari" on the track as is — the details have started rolling out a little more regularly. Now we have a new juicy bit that comes from the folks over at Top Gear. And this tidbit of info happens to deal with the LaFerrari XX featuring half the cylinders of the road-going version.

This makes perfect sense to us, because in December 2013, we dug up a video of a LaFerrari out testing with what was obviously an F1-derived, turbocharged V-6. Check out the video for yourself and listen to that exhaust note. If you close your eyes while listening, you would think you were hearing a new F1 racer out testing.

Given the fact that Ferrari will not confirm what engine the XX model will use, this can only mean that the engine is still in development or that Ferrari is still testing a few different setups. And according to a "high up" official in Ferrari, the V-6 engine is very much in the running as the powerplant of choice. This engine becomes even more logical when you consider that the XX program is all about lightening the car and making it more precise, rather than raw power and speed, and swapping a small-displacement V-6 in place of that hulking V-12 would likely shed some serious weight.

For now, this all remains speculation and hearsay, but it remains a novel concept that may well become a reality.

Stay tuned for more.

Click past the jump to read more about the LaFerrari XX.

Source: Top Gear

If you have paid attention to all the new videos and reviews of the new LaFerrari you may have noticed something awkward on the car’s steering wheel. There is a tiny badge that reads "F150." You can see it here in our screengrab from Sport Auto’s LaFerrari video .

The badge itself is to signify the car’s internal code designation, and to pay homage to the cars of Ferrari’s past.

Let us start with the past. The very first true Ferrari supercar of the modern era was the Ferrari F40 . It was name the F40 as the car was built to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the company. Then when its successor arrived, it received the name F50 . Not because it was Ferrari’s 50th birthday, but rather, 50 is bigger than 40. That trend continued again with the Ferrari Enzo , which had a designation of F60. Now when the LaFerrari was first in production, most people simply referred to it as the F70, so where the hell did the F150 come from?

That is a slightly different nod to history. You see, a long time ago, Italy was not a unified country. It wasn’t until 1861, and after much bloodshed, that the Kingdom of Italy became a united constituency. In 2011, Ferrari named its F1 car the F150 to celebrate 150 years of Italian unity. After some legal troubles with Ford over the name, the car became known as the Ferrari 150° Italia . Since the LaFerrari was under development at a similar time, it seems very obvious why Ferrari chose the "F150" code for the car.

You learn something new every day, eh?

Click past the jump to read a little more about the Ferrari LaFerrari

By now, we’ve come to learn a lot about Ferrari’s priced beauty, the beast incarnate known as the Ferrari LaFerrari (read: "The Ferrari"). But even though we’ve read our fair share of textual reviews of the ultimate Ferrari, it doesn’t hurt to watch and listen to what Autocar and Evo think about the supercar while behind the wheel.

From what I can make of it, the LaFerrari received enormous praise until,its cup runneth over. (Autocar’s" review is by far my favorite, as the build up to the drive is organic and you can see the fear/excitement in the reviewer’s eyes. What’s more, he then proceeds to get things a little drifty, as he shows just how well the LaFerrari twirks in the twist. Not too bad for a nearly 1,000-horsepower supercar, huh?

Keep it here to see all the videos as they are released.

One more video after the jump.

Well here it is folks, the first video footage from a third party of the Ferrari LaFerrari running around Fiorano in the hands of a journalist.

There are two things to take immediate notice of. One: this thing is incredibly fast. Two: it is easily one of the best sounding Ferraris of all time. This Ferrari makes use of a hybrid drivetrain that features a 6.3-liter V-12 and a pair of electric motors to produce almost 1,000 horsepower. Just like its peers, the Porsche 918 and the McLaren P1 , there is absolutely no indication that this thing is running on electricity and petrol simultaneously. All we hear is pure, unadulterated V-12 anger.

Aside from the noise, the video gives a good bit of footage of the interior, and the active rear wing in action. We even get a bit of sideways hoonage. If you wanted details, info or specs, you need to look elsewhere. There is no noise in the video except what comes from the Ferrari, and we think that may be for a very good reason.

Now you may remember that we ran a story about a potential $70,000 fine that comes with leaking information about the LaFerrari early. You may have also noticed that this video has been released just hours before the embargo is lifted.

Now, a couple of things may have happened here. First, Sport Auto may have taken a calculated risk and assumed the pure income from the YouTube video may be enough to offset the fee. Second, as there is not a single word uttered about the car in this video, the lawyers at Sport Auto may have found a loophole around Ferrari’s restrictions.

Either way, we win, as we get crisp automotive pornography and it didn’t cost any of us a dime.

Updated 4/30/2014: Looks like Auto Sport released the video and then got cold feet, as it was pulled down shortly after we broke the story. There is a new video, however, and we posted it after the jump.


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