Ferrari

Ferrari cars

Since Ferrari admitted that there was a race-prepped version of the LaFerrari on the way — as if you couldn’t already toss "The Ferrari" on the track as is — the details have started rolling out a little more regularly. Now we have a new juicy bit that comes from the folks over at Top Gear. And this tidbit of info happens to deal with the LaFerrari XX featuring half the cylinders of the road-going version.

This makes perfect sense to us, because in December 2013, we dug up a video of a LaFerrari out testing with what was obviously an F1-derived, turbocharged V-6. Check out the video for yourself and listen to that exhaust note. If you close your eyes while listening, you would think you were hearing a new F1 racer out testing.

Given the fact that Ferrari will not confirm what engine the XX model will use, this can only mean that the engine is still in development or that Ferrari is still testing a few different setups. And according to a "high up" official in Ferrari, the V-6 engine is very much in the running as the powerplant of choice. This engine becomes even more logical when you consider that the XX program is all about lightening the car and making it more precise, rather than raw power and speed, and swapping a small-displacement V-6 in place of that hulking V-12 would likely shed some serious weight.

For now, this all remains speculation and hearsay, but it remains a novel concept that may well become a reality.

Stay tuned for more.

Click past the jump to read more about the LaFerrari XX.

Source: Top Gear

If you have paid attention to all the new videos and reviews of the new LaFerrari you may have noticed something awkward on the car’s steering wheel. There is a tiny badge that reads "F150." You can see it here in our screengrab from Sport Auto’s LaFerrari video .

The badge itself is to signify the car’s internal code designation, and to pay homage to the cars of Ferrari’s past.

Let us start with the past. The very first true Ferrari supercar of the modern era was the Ferrari F40 . It was name the F40 as the car was built to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the company. Then when its successor arrived, it received the name F50 . Not because it was Ferrari’s 50th birthday, but rather, 50 is bigger than 40. That trend continued again with the Ferrari Enzo , which had a designation of F60. Now when the LaFerrari was first in production, most people simply referred to it as the F70, so where the hell did the F150 come from?

That is a slightly different nod to history. You see, a long time ago, Italy was not a unified country. It wasn’t until 1861, and after much bloodshed, that the Kingdom of Italy became a united constituency. In 2011, Ferrari named its F1 car the F150 to celebrate 150 years of Italian unity. After some legal troubles with Ford over the name, the car became known as the Ferrari 150° Italia . Since the LaFerrari was under development at a similar time, it seems very obvious why Ferrari chose the "F150" code for the car.

You learn something new every day, eh?

Click past the jump to read a little more about the Ferrari LaFerrari

By now, we’ve come to learn a lot about Ferrari’s priced beauty, the beast incarnate known as the Ferrari LaFerrari (read: "The Ferrari"). But even though we’ve read our fair share of textual reviews of the ultimate Ferrari, it doesn’t hurt to watch and listen to what Autocar and Evo think about the supercar while behind the wheel.

From what I can make of it, the LaFerrari received enormous praise until,its cup runneth over. (Autocar’s" review is by far my favorite, as the build up to the drive is organic and you can see the fear/excitement in the reviewer’s eyes. What’s more, he then proceeds to get things a little drifty, as he shows just how well the LaFerrari twirks in the twist. Not too bad for a nearly 1,000-horsepower supercar, huh?

Keep it here to see all the videos as they are released.

One more video after the jump.

Well here it is folks, the first video footage from a third party of the Ferrari LaFerrari running around Fiorano in the hands of a journalist.

There are two things to take immediate notice of. One: this thing is incredibly fast. Two: it is easily one of the best sounding Ferraris of all time. This Ferrari makes use of a hybrid drivetrain that features a 6.3-liter V-12 and a pair of electric motors to produce almost 1,000 horsepower. Just like its peers, the Porsche 918 and the McLaren P1 , there is absolutely no indication that this thing is running on electricity and petrol simultaneously. All we hear is pure, unadulterated V-12 anger.

Aside from the noise, the video gives a good bit of footage of the interior, and the active rear wing in action. We even get a bit of sideways hoonage. If you wanted details, info or specs, you need to look elsewhere. There is no noise in the video except what comes from the Ferrari, and we think that may be for a very good reason.

Now you may remember that we ran a story about a potential $70,000 fine that comes with leaking information about the LaFerrari early. You may have also noticed that this video has been released just hours before the embargo is lifted.

Now, a couple of things may have happened here. First, Sport Auto may have taken a calculated risk and assumed the pure income from the YouTube video may be enough to offset the fee. Second, as there is not a single word uttered about the car in this video, the lawyers at Sport Auto may have found a loophole around Ferrari’s restrictions.

Either way, we win, as we get crisp automotive pornography and it didn’t cost any of us a dime.

Updated 4/30/2014: Looks like Auto Sport released the video and then got cold feet, as it was pulled down shortly after we broke the story. There is a new video, however, and we posted it after the jump.

It hasn’t been long since we’ve shown you footage of a Nissan GT-R Spec-V burning on the Nurburgring track and, unfortunately, we have to get back on the "sports cars on fire" topic with a Ferrari FF as the main character.

It’s widely known that Ferraris are likely to go up in flames if handled inappropriately, but the FF shooting brake wasn’t one of them. At least not to the same extent as the 458 Italia , which had to be recalled after several models burned to a crisp.

Ferrari FF fires have been isolated for now, with the previous incident having occurred in Poland a couple of years ago, but, as of today, the number of FFs totaled by flames increased by one. It all happened in Hong Kong, where an owner lost its beloved vehicle shortly after exiting a tunnel.

According to local reports, the fire started from the FF’s engine compartment, with smoke quickly turning into a fire that spread rapidly by swallowing both the nose of the car and the interior. There’s no official word as to what may have caused the fire, but it’s believed it may have something to do with an electrical short.

Interestingly enough, the FF in question was being delivered to its owner after being inspected at the local Ferrari service center the day before.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari FF.

Posted on by Simona  

Earlier this month, Ferrari filled some patent drawings revealing a new model that many people believed was the new Ferrari California . On the same day, Ferrari also filed a patent for the new "SP FFX" name and an accompanying logo. These two occurrences on the same day lead us to believe that those patent drawings were, in fact, of the SP FFX.

First things first; why is it unlikely that these drawings are of the new California? Mainly because the car showed in the images featured Ferrari FF door mirrors, headlights, taillights and general proportions. These make us believe that we were actually looking at a special FF Coupe.

The SP FFX name is a little unclear, but we do know that SP stands for Special Projects. As for the "FFX;" that part makes it pretty clear that a special edition FF is on its way.

Updated 04/28/2014: More images of the upcoming SP FXX surfaced online today, revealing just how cool Ferrari’s latest special project will look. We also got a few new details on the engine. (Carscoops)

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari SP FXX.

Source: Jalopnik

If you have ever wondered why TopSpeed.com doesn’t get to do many in-person reviews on Ferraris , this might help explain things. Certain car makers are very picky, and apply lots of heavy restrictions to their car reviews. According to Jalopnik, Ferrari has now started making writers agree to a $70,000 fine if they break embargo times for the Ferrari LaFerrari.

Basically, if I got to drive the Ferrari LaFerrari , and I wanted to talk to you about it today, it would cost me $70,000. If I waited a few weeks to tell you, it wouldn’t cost me a dime. It seems strange, but this is the amount of power that some of these exotic and exclusive companies wield. On top of these types of restrictions, Ferrari has a very short list of “approved” journalists that are allowed behind the wheel of their machines.

That is not to say that we wouldn’t play ball. Our most important site feature is you guys and gals, the readers. As absurd as a massive fine for talking about a car early may seem, we would jump through almost any hoop to get you guys the cool stories and awesome drives you deserve. We just aren’t on that short list yet.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari LaFerrari.

Source: Jalopnik

Ferrari’s LaFerrari XX project has barely commenced, but it appears the Italians are already charging toward setting a new Nurburgring lap record for track-only vehicles.

Word has it the Maranello stable has already managed to run the famous course in 6:35, with an official announcement in the coming months. If the rumor proves to be true, the LaFerrari XX will become the fastest production-based, track-exclusive car around the `Ring, surpassing the Pagani Zonda R and its 6:47.50 lap.

Although the LaFerrari XX won’t be able to challenge the production car record, due to its track-only purpose, the track-only supercar will also be faster than the Porsche 918 Spyder , which clocked a 6:57 lap last September. The company has yet to announce a Nurburgring lap for the road-legal LaFerrari .

Additionally, the new racer will smash the records set by the Ferrari 599XX and the 312T, the Prancing Horse’s only race cars to have lapped the track in less than seven minutes. The former achievement was record in 2010, while the latter dates back to the 1975 Formula One season.

Click past the jump to read more about the LaFerrari XX.

Source: Autoguide

Well, it seems that Ferrari is trying to keep secrets. The guys over at Carscoops.com have managed to obtain a photo of a previously unknown Fezza hiding under a sheet. The front end similar features the headlamps of the F12berlinetta , but the bumper, hood and overall design are unique.

Carscoops claims that they have been told this is the latest project from Ferrari SP America, and it is a new “targa version” of the F12. SP America is the special projects division that is in charge of creating unique and one-off creations for well-heeled customers. Judging by the massive front intakes and what looks like even larger brakes, I think this machine will be packing much more than a fancy roof. It is hard to tell from this photo, but it also appears that this new F12 variant will be losing the cars distinctive buttresses in the front fenders as well.

As always with this kind of thing, everything here should be taken with a grain of salt, but if I were a betting man, I would expect this to be a one-off F12 with a power boost from 730 ponies to at least 750 horsepower. I wouldn’t be surprised if there is an extra dose of carbon fiber to help cut weight as well.

We shouldn’t have too long to wait for details, as the car should be unveiled very soon.

Keep it locked here for all the news as it breaks on this newest Prancing Horse.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari F12Berlinetta.

Source: Carscoops

Ever since the LaFerrari was unveiled at last year’s Geneva Motor Show , Ferrari aficionados have been dreaming about a track-exclusive version of the ultra-fast hybrid. Something in the vein of the FXX , an Enzo -based race car built in 30 units between 2005 and 2007 or even the F40 LM .

It took the Italians more than a year to admit they will be building one, but they finally did it a couple of days ago , when Antonello Coletta, chief of Ferrari’s Sporting Activity Department, said LaFerrari race car with the "XX" moniker attached to its name is underway.

Those of you that were still reluctant to the news will be quite happy to find out that a prototype version of the LaFerrari XX is already being tested. And to remove any trace of doubt, we have a batch of spy shots to prove it.

The mule showed up at the Nurburgring track (where else?), wearing nothing but its carbon-fiber suit. Interestingly enough, there are no aerodynamic-enhancing parts attached to the body (yet), but the supercar is obviously fitted with lightweight polycarbonate windows, mandatory for any lightweight, race-spec vehicle.

Click past the jump to read more about the LaFerrari XX.


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