Ferrari

Ferrari cars

When somebody brought up a statement like Ferrari using V-6 engines , they’d probably be met with either bewilderment, hysterical laughter, or maybe a combination of both. But times have changed in the auto industry and no more is that evident than a recent report indicating that Maranello is seriously contemplating a V-6-powered entry-level super car.

Sources told Car Magazine that Ferrari is currently developing a 2.9-liter twin-turbo V-6 engine that will be used for future sports cars, specifically a more affordable version of the 458 Italia , considered as the incumbent “mainstream” super car. Details behind the planned engine are still being kept under wraps, but there’s reason to believe that somewhere in the neighborhood of 500 horsepower and 450 pound-feet of torque is achievable.

The rumored V-6 super car isn’t so much an admission from Ferrari that it wants to start catering to mass market consumers. Instead, it could be the next step in the company’s efforts to offer more sustainable products that can adhere to emissions regulations now and in the future.

A V-6-powered Ferrari that people can somewhat afford is definitely an interesting proposition if you think about it. Such a scenario would’ve been impossible in the past.

But times are definitely changing and we could be looking at the Prancing Horse beginning its evolution in front of our eyes.

Note: Photo is of the Ferrari 458 Italia

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 458 Italia

Source: CAR Magazine

The turbocharged California T came as a big surprise in early 2014, but it appears Ferrari aims to add forced induction to all of its V-8-powered sports cars . Concerned about both fuel economy and safe ways to increase output, the Italians are testing a turbocharged version of the Ferrari 458 as we speak. While rumors about a force-fed 458 surfaced in early 2014 when a white mule was spotted playing in the snow, a new batch of spy shots featuring a camouflaged sports car comes to confirm the turbo 458 is well underway.

Reportedly dubbed M458-T , the new iteration of the company’s entry-level sports car is expected to see significant gains in terms of horsepower. Specifically, the turbocharger attached to the new V-8 unit is likely to push output to around 670 ponies, a 74-horsepower addition to the 596 ponies available with the 458 Speciale. Of course, more power means an updated cooling system and revised aerodynamics as well, with minor design changes to further mark the introduction of the first turbocharged 458.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 458 M

Chris Harris spends time in some pretty flashy cars in the name of his profession, yet he still finds time to take his own cars out for a drive. The difference between normal journalists’ rides and Harris’ is that he actually owns a flashy car. His pick is the beautiful Ferrari FF .

The FF is powered by a 6.2-liter, direct-injected V-12 making a massive 660 horsepower and 503 pound-feet of torque that’s mated to a seven-speed automatic transmission with paddle shifters and delivers power to all four wheels. The combination of power, quick shifting, and all-wheel drive means the FF hits 60 mph in just 3.5 seconds.

While those stats are impressive, none of that seems to matter to Harris as he’s blasting down winding European roads. For him, it’s all about the culmination of all the FF’s parts; the feel, the sound, and the experience. The FF turns what would normally be a boring drive home into an event. “Everything about it makes you feel special,” he says. “It makes you feel not just one cut above the AMGs and the Ms, but three cuts above. And I love that.”

As the passing countryside melts behind the FF, Harris continues by saying, “The FF really makes the driver feel special at all speeds — and that’s the thing that’s surprised me in my five months and six thousand miles so far in this car."

After ending his rave of the FF’s interior accoutrements, he finishes by saying, “It just brightens my day. And what price do you put on that? … about $2400* a month, actually.”

We find his humor rather entertaining.

*Harris actually quotes 1500 pounds a month.

Known as the most successful manufacturer ever to race in Formula One , Ferrari is also famous for its glorious sports car racing years. The Italians gathered no less than nine outright Le Mans wins and 13 World Sportscar Championships between the late 1940 and the early 1970s, being surpassed by very few companies in that department. Ferrari’s golden age of endurance racing came to a halt in 1974, when Enzo stopped all development of sports cars prototypes in order to focus on Formula One. Maranello lied dormant for nearly two decades until 1994, when the 333 SP, built at the request of amateur racer Giampiero Moretti, hit the track marking the brand’s return to sports prototype racing.

Designed by famed Italian chassis manufacturer Dallara, the 333 SP was offered to privateers who raced it with great success until 2003. The open-top race car not only managed to give Ferrari a triumphant return to sports car racing, it also became the only Ferrari to win the 24 Hours of Daytona and the 12 Hours of Sebring.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 333 SP

Introduced in 1953, the Ferrari 250 quickly became the company’s most successful vehicle lineup. It included everything from road-legal grand tourers to the 250 Testa Rossa and 250 LM race cars. More importantly, the range spawned the iconic 250 GTO, currently the most expensive Ferrari ever auctioned (as of August 20, 2014). The 250 line came to an end in 1964, when it was replaced by two distinct families, the 275 and 330. While the 275 GTB/C stepped in to substitute the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB/4 took center stage as Ferrari’s new flagship model.

Introduced at the 1966 Paris Motor Show , the GTB/4 quickly became popular with sports car enthusiasts and celebrities, especially in the United States. Even Hollywood actor and motoring icon Steven McQueen ordered one of the V-12-powered grand tourers, receiving it on the set of the "Bullitt" movie. McQueens example became the most expensive GTB/4 ever auctioned in 2014, when it crossed the block for $10 million. Because of this huge auction sum, we decided to have a closer look at this enticing, berlinetta-bodied Ferrari.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

We’ve known about the 458 Speciale Spider — or whatever it name ends up being — since June 2014, and we all know that it’ll essentially be mechanically identical to its coupe sibling. This means that it’ll carry a 4.5-liter, V-8 engine with 605 cv (596 ponies) and 398 pound-feet of torque. This should translate to a 0-to-60-mph time in the low-three-second range. What we didn’t know, until today, is just how limited it will be.

According to 4WheelsNews, the 458 Special Spider will be limited to exactly 458 units. The website does not list a source, other than the typical "insider," so a grain of salt may be in order.

Other details that 4WheelsNews learned while talking to a "friend" who attended a special unveiling of the Spider include some styling variations between this and the coupe model. The main variances of note are the different stripes that come on the Spider model and two new wheel options. Like the report of the number of units, the source is an unnamed "friend," so this could end up not being the case.

We should learn all the juicy details soon, as we expect to see the 458 Speciale Spider in the flesh at the 2014 Paris Motor Show in October.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 458 Speciale

Source: 4WheelsNews
Posted on by Nico DeMattia  

Chris Harris is back again, making me jealous of his life. He recently spent some time in Maranello, testing the new Ferrari LaFerrari . The LaFerrari, despite having a silly name, is the hardcore, hybrid successor to the famous Enzo. It’s also the Italian answer to the Porsche 918 and the McLaren P1 . It’s also probably the most brutally fast hybrid production car ever made.

Chris got to test each of those aforementioned hybrid supercars and had nothing but great things to say about them. However, he seems to feel a bit different about this LaFerrari. It seems to be the only one of the three he actually loved. The reason for that is probably the fact that the LaFerrari hides it’s techno-wonder more than the others. The Porsche 918 is a unashamed nerd-fest (a very cool, very fast nerd-fest), and the McLaren is all business with its very serious, designed-in-a-wind-tunnel looks. The LaFerrari, on the other hand, is typical Italian pantomime and theater, it’s a celebration of colors and noise. I personally think it looks fantastic, I especially like the bug-antenna-style wing mirrors. It looks like a proper Ferrari, not just an exercise in aerodynamics and numbers. They each have their own character but the LaFerrari seems to have the most interesting one.

Combine all of this power, performance, handling prowess and looks, and you have possibly the greatest supercar the world has ever seen. Now go watch Mr. Harris give it "the full potatoes!".

I’ve seen a lot of timepieces born from collaborations between an automaker and a watch company, but I honestly haven’t seen anything quite like this. British watchmaker Christopher Ward has created a limited-edition watch that has a piece of an actual car embedded in it. But wait, it’s not just any car we’re talking about here; this particular watch has an original piece of exterior paneling from a Ferrari 250 GTO . Let me know if any of you have seen or heard anything like this before because I surely haven’t. I also haven’t seen a unicorn in my lifetime, but that’s a story for another day.

This particular watch, though, is a thing of beauty. It’s called the C70 3527 GT and the ’3527 GT’ nomenclature is a nod to the chassis number of the seventh 250 GTO.

Christopher Ward is only releasing 100 pieces and each individual buyer will only receive one unit. Each watch will come with a price tag of $2,950, which is incredibly expensive compared to my humble, eight-year-old Casio G-Shock.

Should you be interested in ordering the C70 3527 GT Chronometer, you’re going to need to contact Christopher Ward directly to let its sales people know you’re willing to spend that much money on arguably the most unique auto-themed timepiece in the world. It’s first-come, first-served so act quickly if you want one.

Click past the jump to read more about the Christopher Ward C70 3527 GT Chronometer.

A 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO has become the most expensive car sold at auction after changing owners for a whopping $38,115,000 at Bonhams’ Quail Lodge Auction in Carmel, California. The classic Prancing Horse surpassed the auction record set by a 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196R Formula One race car that sold for $30 million at the 2013 Goodwood Festival of Speed Auction.

Only 39 of these Ferraris were built in the 1960s, with many of them fetching millions of dollars during either public auctions or private sales. One example that was owned by Stirling Moss changed hands for $35 million in 2012, while another 250 GTO sold for $52 million in 2013. Both were sold privately.

Powered by a 3.0-liter, V-12 engine, the 250 GTO shown above — chassis and engine number 3851GT — was driven to a second-place overall finish in the 1962 Tour de France by Jo Schlesser and Henry Oreiller. More a maintained car than a restored one, the 3851GT has been active all its 54-year-long life, being raced in many classic motorsport events. It’s one of the most often raced 250 GTOs and it has been in a single family ownership for the past 49 years. This pretty much explains the huge price tag, doesn’t it?

The $38-million 250 GTO wasn’t the only Ferrari to fetch big bucks at Bonhams’ sale in California. Ten other Italian sports and race cars crossed the block for a combined total of $65.9 million. The bundle included a 1962 250 GT SWB Speciale that sold for $6.8 million, a 1953 250 Mille Miglia Berlinetta driven by Phil Hill for $7.2 million, and a 1978 312 T3 Formula One car for $2.3 million.

Click past the jump to read about the Ferrari 250 GTO

I have been given the opportunity to drive some incredible cars in some great places. I have taken a rally-prepped Miata to the top of Pikes Peak; I drove a GT-R from Miami to Knoxville in a day for Christmas; and I got to bomb down the Blue Ridge Parkway in a Porsche Cayman S . Still, I have never been given than chance to drive anything nearly as incredible as the F40.

In this latest episode of Inside EVO, we get a look at what it is like to drive a Ferrari F40 through the Alps for a day. What makes this video special is the great commentary. Rather than a traditional video with epic music and long sweeping scenery, Henry Catchpole talks about what the drive was actually like, including the highs and the lows. He talks about the car having a dead battery, bump starting it from a gas station parking lot and more.

Our jobs look glamorous a lot of the time, and it is really nice to get an inside look at what all can go on — and go wrong — when we are trying to get you guys the cool and amazing content that you deserve. I don’t want to spoil his entire story, so why don’t you give that play button a little click and just enjoy the video . I promise you that it is easily worth the seven minutes of your time.


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