Ford Mustang

Ford Mustang

The 2015 Ford Mustang hasn’t even hit showrooms yet, but the aftermarket performance scene is already preparing for upgrades and modifications. Legendary Mustang modifier Roush Performance is among the first on the scene with a silhouette teaser of its upcoming creation. Roush posted the image on its Facebook, saying more information would be slowly revealed over the next few weeks. As of August 1, 2014, the picture and pure speculation is all we have to go on.

Roush is famous for offering different stages of performance boosts via bolt-on parts, namely superchargers. It’s very likely this trend will continue with the new Mustang. Remember, the ‘Stang’s 5.0-liter V-8 isn’t changing all that much for 2015, so Roush already knows what it is dealing with.

Roush’s current supercharger offerings include Stages one through three. The Stage 1 kit bumps power up 155 horses and 115 pound-feet to total an impressive 575 horsepower and 505 pound-feet. What’s more, the Stage 3 kit pushes power to 675 horsepower and 585 pound-feet of torque. Those are stout numbers, to say the least.

Of course a Roush-upgraded Mustang wouldn’t be complete without a body kit. No doubt Roush will add aero bits like diffusers, spoilers, and chin splitters to the new pony car.

But hang on, the 2015 Mustang has a new performance-minded engine under its hood: the 2.3-liter EcoBoost. Perhaps Roush is planning performance upgrades for the four-pot. A bigger turbo? Larger intercoolers? Upgraded fuel injectors? Maybe Roush will push the 310-horse EcoBoost closer to 400 horsepower? For now, it’s all speculation, but stay tuned as Roush debuts its plans for the all-new Mustang .

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Ford Mustang.

Source: Roush

Hey everyone, welcome to Episode 022 of the TopSpeed.com Podcast.
This week is a little weird, so let me start with an apology. I am traveling this week, and I have some pretty terrible internet. The result is that the first 10 minutes or so of the show is pretty laggy and hard to listen to. Thankfully we came up with an idea to fix it, and the show gets better. So, thanks for sticking with us, and sorry about the technical issues.

Once the show finally gets moving, we cover Weekly Wheels in which Mark discusses the Cadillac CTS and I talk about the Porsche Panamera S E-Hybrid . Sadly, Justin had no new toys last week.

For news we covered a lot of topics from the new CTS-V and the Ford Mustang SVT on the Nurburgring , to special one-off versions of the BMW i8 and the new Polaris Slingshot. A Corvette powered Darth Vader helmet and the death of the VW Eos also make an appearance.

We make our way over to viewer questions and take a minute to discuss what cars we are most looking forward to next year, and we talk about how well our wives can drive. That part got a little strange…

We finish out the show with a trio of James Bond cars in Own, Drive, Burn.

We want to thank everyone who stuck with us through the live show, and I would like to apologize again for the issues at the start of the show. Normal service will resume next week.

Have a safe week, and a wonderful weekend everyone.

We’ve already seen photos of the upcoming 2016 Mustang SVT lapping the Nurburgring, thanks to our paparazzi earlier this week. Now, time has come to have a more dynamic look at the high-performance muscle car as TouriClips released a three-minute video with two SVTs being trotted around the "Green Hell".

And boy what a video this is! Not only are the two coupes tackling the iconic German course at full throttle, they’re also doing so rather aggressively, having no trouble taking those tight curves at high speed. In fact, tire squeal is kept to a minimum, which says a lot about Mustang’s ability on the track, especially with that new independent suspension mounted in the rear. Speaking of tire screech, its absence also allows us to hear that wonderful V-8 growl better.

The engine sounds like there’s no forced induction, meaning the SVT is motivated by an updated, all-motor, 5.0-liter Coyote, maybe with a slight displacement increase. We expect output to sit in the 500-horsepower area — a bonus of at least 70 ponies compared to the range-topping Mustang GT. Naturally, the extra power will be backed by a lowered curb weight, a re-tuned chassis, and that mean-looking, aerodynamic body kit.

Details are still under wraps — or under camouflage if you will — but the prototype appears to be running on 19-inch front and 20-inch rear wheels. The aggressive stance is further enhance by the massive quad exhaust pipes integrated in the rear diffuser. All told, the 2016 Mustang SVT looks, sound and acts like a race car on the ’Ring. That’s reason enough to keep us excited and on the lookout for more details. Stay tuned to TopSpeed for more info on this hot muscle car .

With Ford celebrating the Mustang’s 50th anniversary this year, it seems only appropriate to take a gander at a vintage model that enjoys both an iconic status and a resale value that’s far and above its original MSRP back in 1968.

While the Mustang was available with several engine options, the one to lust after was the 428-cubic-inch, Police Interceptor V-8 found in the GT500. It spat out roughly 420 horsepower and nearly 450 pound-feet of torque. Mated to a three-speed automatic, the GT500 could lay down 0-to-60-mph times around six seconds on its way to a quarter mile in just over 14 seconds — pretty respectable numbers for that era.

All that extra grunt came courtesy of the legendary Mustang man, Carol Shelby and his affiliation with Ford Motor Company. The extra tuning and Shelby’s name makes examples of his work very valuable these days. As of this writing, the particular example seen above is up for sale at RK Motors for a cool $149,900. With all the right paperwork and certified documentation, this car is the real deal.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1968 Ford Shelby Mustang GT500.

Posted on by Austin Taylor  

The 1967 Ford Shelby Mustang GT350 is a classic, red-blooded, American muscle car . While the Mustang line was only three years old in 1967, this didn’t stop the legendary Carroll Shelby from injecting a healthy dose of his ingenuity into the redesigned, 1967 model. These Shelby Mustangs included powerful engines, race-bred transmissions, and strong rear differentials to create the ultimate drag racers. Impressive acceleration, great looks, amazing street presence, and glorious V-8 sounds were all standard equipment.

Sure, this muscular pony may not be as insanely powerful as some of the cars of today, but remember that this thing is all motor. There are no electronic gadgets and gizmos or crazy forced-induction systems padding its numbers. It truly is a fine example of classic mechanical engineering at its finest.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1967 Ford Shelby Mustang GT350.

Developed on a completely redesigned platform with fully independent front and rear suspension systems, the 2015 Mustang marks the beginning of a new era for the iconic pony. Ford says the sixth-gen Mustang will be the most agile of the breed, and we have every reason to believe it, given the enormous amount of technology packed under the shell. But it seems there’s even more where that came from, as the Blue Oval is also offering a Performance Pack for the muscle car .

Available on the EcoBoost-powered Mustang and the range-topping GT model, the Performance Pack adds numerous drivetrain improvements to the pony and promises to improve its performance on the race track. And by "performance" we mean better handling, grip and faster lap times.

How fast? Well, Ford says the 2015 Mustang GT with the Performance Package is quicker than the 2013 Mustang Boss 302 . That’s major news considering the Boss 302’s lightness and race-inspired underpinnings. The sixth-gen pony might be controversial as far as styling goes, but it’s shaping up to be a spectacular vehicle in the performance department.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Ford Mustang Performance Package.

We already know most of the details surrounding the 2015 Mustang , but what Ford has given us so far is just the tip of the iceberg. There’s at least one high-performance version underway and a bunch of special-edition models are sure to follow. While the beefed-up Mustang SVT is still testing on the ’Ring with swirly camouflage covering its muscular body, Ford’s next special-edition ’Stang is already out in the open, thanks to our friends over at Mustangs Daily.

The said muscle car is actually a one-off model built for EAA AirVenture and joins previous bespoke projects that have paid tribute to either iconic U.S. airplanes or air demonstration squadrons such as the U.S.A.F. Thunderbirds. The latest custom Mustang to arrive in the EAA AirVenture collection before being auctioned off for charity is inspired by the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II, a multi-role fighter plane with stealth capability introduced in 2006.

Like most aviation-themed Mustangs, the custom muscle car will go under the hammer at the Gathering of Eagles charity event at EAA AirVenture. All proceeds will be donated to the EAA Young Eagles program, a non-profit organization providing free flights to aviation enthusiasts since 1992.

Updated 07/25/2014: Following the earlier announcement, the first images of the new Mustang Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II edition have surfaced on the internet. (mustang6g)

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Ford Mustang Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II.

Ford gave birth to the GT350 nameplate in 1965, the same year when Carroll Shelby was commissioned to build high-performance versions of the first-generation Mustang. Built in 1965 and 1966, the initial GT350 was not just lighter than a regular Mustang , but more powerful too. Originally rated at 271 ponies, the ’Stang’s 4.7-liter V-8 was uprated to deliver 306 horsepower at Shelby American’s shop, where it would also be equipped with heavy-duty rear axles, larger rear drum brakes, and front disc brakes. All 1965 models were painted Wimbledon White with Guardsman Blue stripes, while the 1966 model year brought more colors to the car. The GT350 continued in 1967, 1968 and 1969 with more cosmetic changes that performance updates. The GT350 moniker disappeared until 2011, when it returned for the fifth-generation Mustang. As the redesigned pony rolls into dealerships for the 2015 model year, the GT350 is about to make yet another comeback as a track-prepped version of the sixth-gen Mustang.

Set to arrive for the 2016 model year, the first Shelby Mustang GT350 to feature an independent rear suspension is shaping up to be Dearborn’s answer to the Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 . Details are still under wraps as of September 2014, but the GT350 has been spotted roaming the streets and lapping the Nurburgring track numerous times. Read on to find out what we know about Ford’s upcoming muscle car .

Click past the jump to read more about the 2016 Ford Shelby Mustang GT350

You’re probably not going to believe this, but in the auto industry, there is such a thing as having too much power. It shouldn’t be a problem if it’s power you can control, but if it’s a little out of your reach, it’s probably a good idea not to tempt fate. Drag racer Dennis Bailey failed to get that memo, and he and his 3,000-horsepower Ford Mustang paid a steep price for it.

Bailey was at a drag race at South Georgia Motorsports Park in Adel, Georgia when he participated in a quarter-mile race with another equally chunky, muscle-bound Mustang. Both cars get off the line well but immediately after that, Bailey’s Mustang slowly shoots up from all the power driving those rear wheels. It continues on its upward ascent before being completely perpendicular to the ground.

The car hits a barrier soon after that before toppling over, flipping numerous times before resting in a heap of smoke, debris, and flying tires. Fortunately, Bailey reportedly escaped the harrowing crash without any significant injuries. The same can’t be said for the Mustang though, which appeared to look completely flattened and irreparable.

These are the real-life dangers of driving a car with that much power in a setting that encourages you to go pedal to the metal. Bailey’s lucky to only escape with minor dings, but it still doesn’t take into account the all-too-real possibility that it could have ended much worse for him.

There was plenty of new and interesting things to climb the famous hill at the Goodwood Festival of Speed this year, but perhaps nothing else hits closer to home than the iconic American pony car in its latest iteration; the 2015 Ford Mustang . With it still months away from hitting dealer showrooms and with no official reviews gracing the glossy pages of magazines or the Interwebz, the Mustang is still a dark horse in terms of third-party information.

But we get just a little closer with this video from Ford of a Mustang GT Coupe barreling up the hay-lined hill. Professional driver Paul Swift (a fitting last name, huh?) takes the wheel of the ‘Stang. Unfortunately, the 5.0-liter’s exhaust is masked by the video’s musical selection. There are a few instances where some burble cuts through, but we’ll wait to reserve judgment on its sound. Then again, Mustangs have always managed to sound amazing, so it’s unlikely we’ll be disappointed.

The video also gives us a good look at the manual transmission’s shifter. It appears to have nice, short throws that are easy to manipulate. We also get a decent look at the interior and its all-new dashboard, and form-fitting Recaro seats.

Sadly, the video is less than a minute long, but there are several good scenes and sequences within. Ford also neglects to publish the Mustang’s time, leaving us to wonder how well it did in what is likely its first-ever public racing event.


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