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Who knew that a 40-second video could say so much about McLaren’s history. But that’s exactly what this video accomplishes, showing us each and every car — production and racing — that McLaren has ever built. Despite being only founded in 1963 by Bruce McLaren, McLaren has become one of the most accomplished racing teams, a testament to the relentless pursuit of excellence the company had from its very first day in operation.

From old-school racing classics like the Group 7 M1 and the M2B to its current lineup of supercars , including the P1 and the recently-introduced 650 S , McLaren has set a bar for automotive excellence that very few automakers in the world today can even come close to approaching.

Watching this video and seeing the history of McLaren flash before our very eyes made us remember a McLaren commercial with Johnnie Walker back in the late 90’s. We’re hazy on what the ad was showing, but we do remember the overall message of the team’s pursuit of being the best.

"The race for perfection has no finish line".

In so many ways, that line reflects on what McLaren was, is, and will continue to be moving forward.

We cover a lot of automotive-related material here at TopSpeed. From the latest and greatest vehicles with promises of fast quarter-mile times, insane 0-to-60 sprints , and the occasional gravel-shredding off-roader , it’s all about the newest and fastest.

But sometimes, you just have to slow down and enjoy the drive — to bask in every last mile of a pure driving experience in a pure sports car . That’s exactly what one man set out to do.

Scott Fisher and his beloved 1967 Datsun Fairlady Roadster are on a meandering mission to travel the United States in a clockwise fashion, while soaking in the experience on the timeless journey. No schedules needed.

Fisher started his epic journey last spring from his home in Las Vegas after selling his manufacturing business that he ran for 16 long years. It has since taken him over 30,000 miles through the American heartland, rolling over local highways and byways, while avoiding major routes and interstates “like the plague.” And it was all done in his beautiful ’67 Fairlady.

“I knew I needed to kinda’ get out, and unwind, and get my mojo back,” the 45-year-old man says. His journey has taken him north through the Pacific Northwest and over through the flyover states. Fisher’s goal was to stay up north during the summer months to avoid the extreme heat and sun exposure. “[It’s] allowed me to keep the top down, maybe 80 percent of the time.”

Click past the jump to keep reading about Scott’s amazing travels

Posted on by Simona  

The new-generation Ford Mustang will be unveiled on December 5th, but for those of you who want a quick look back at the evolution of the Mustang, Ford has prepared a little video (above) for you.

This new morphing video crams 50 years of famous — and some infamous — Mustang designs into 100 seconds, giving you the chance to remember all of the changes the Mustang endured through its storied history.

For those of you who are not as familiar with the Mustang’s lifespan, Ford unveiled the Mustang in 1964 and to date, it has gone through five different generations, all with a specific design language and with a different engine lineup.

The sixth-generation Mustang will be unveiled at the end of this week, and it will be offered with a series of innovative changes, like the availability of an independent rear suspension and a global design language.


Happy Thanksgiving to all the TopSpeed readers, we hope that your Turkey Day is off to a great start. We all know the importance of Thanksgiving here in the U.S., but this day is also a very special one for the automobile racing industry.

On this day, 118 years ago — in 1895 for those that don’t have a calculator handy — America’s first ever automotive race , the Chicago Times-Herald Race, took place. It was a 54-mile journey from Jackson Park in Chicago to Evanston, IL and back, and it included just six cars at the starting line — two electric cars and three gasoline-powered cars.

Only four of the cars actually finished, and the highest top speed during the race was a sluggish 7.5 mph. The winner, Frank Duryea, managed to complete the icy course in nine hours, netting a $5,000 prize in the process (about $140,000 by today’s dollar value), and the second-place finisher took another two hours to reach the start-finish marker, which was a boulder near the Museum of Science and Industry.

This rock is now legendary in the automotive racing industry, as it marks the beginning of one of the biggest industries in America. Each and every year, a group of 100, or so, exotic cars and motorcycles make their way to "The Rock" on Thanksgiving day to celebrate the race (weather permitting). And this year is no different. The celebration typically kicks off around 9 a.m.

So, if you have some extra time between cooking and stuffing your face with Turkey, you should swing by and check out some of the cars and see the most famous rock in racing history! For those that don’t know, "The Rock" is southwest of the Museum of Science and Industry. Simply take the Museum exit on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago and look for the line cars; you can’t miss it.

Check out a map of the original race after the jump.

The Bugatti name has long been associated with style and performance in the realms of automotive excellence, but few are aware of impact the Bugatti name made in the worlds of art and craftsmanship.

The Bugatti family began a legacy for themselves in the late 1800s that continued through many generations and lasts even still. The Mullin Automotive Museum, an institution devoted to showcasing French art and automobiles from the Art Deco era, has announced The Art of Bugatti exhibition that starts in the spring of 2014.

The museum is located roughly an hour north of Los Angeles in Oxnard, California, and it will play host to the Bugatti family collection of oil paintings, bronze sculptures, intricate furniture and, of course, some of Bugatti’s most famous cars, including the current Veyron .

Besides the Veyron , the exhibition will also host the early Brescia racecar , the race-winning Types 35s, 37, and 51; Jean Bugatti’s Type 64 Papillon and Atlantic Coupé; Types 57 Aravis and Atalante, and the Type 41 Bugatti Royale. Even more impressive is perhaps one of Bugatti’s earliest four-wheeled creations, a horse-drawn cart, complete with the iconic Bugatti logo branded on its side.

Click past the jump to see more pictures of the classic Bugatti cars and artwork


Very few automakers throw a celebration quite like Ferrari .

This year, the iconic Italian automaker celebrated its 30th anniversary in Hong Kong, and true to form, it organized quite an event to ring in the celebrations.

The pictures paint the story, fellas. Those are over 600 Ferraris, ranging from old-time classics to the latest releases, all converging at the Asia World Expo in Lantau island, to commemorate Ferrari’s 30th anniversary in the Chinese territory.

To add prestige to the event, Ferrari chairman Luca di Montezemolo was in attendance to lead the celebration that included some of the most iconic Ferraris in existence, including the Dino , the 195 Inter, and the 365 GTS . Modern Ferraris were also in attendance, including the 458 Challenge , 599XX and the FXX Evoluzione .

The event also gave Ferrari the opportunity to unveil its latest offering, the 458 Speciale , which was unveiled by F1 test driver Marc Gene.

Congratulations to Ferrari on its 30th anniversary in Hong Kong. Here’s to more years of success in the Chinese territory.

Click past the jump to read about the 2014 Ferrari 458 Speciale

Meet "the most important car."

We’ve covered our fair share of rare and historic classic cars here at TopSpeed, but this 1931 Voisin C20 MyLord takes the cake. Its level of beauty and class is only overshadowed by its rarity and appraised value. It is truly a gorgeous thing to behold.

Powered by an innovative sleeve-valve V-12 engine riding on an underslung chassis, the two-door coupe was built in France by automotive and aeronautics pioneer Gabriel Voisin who was more well-known for his achievements in the air than on the road. He did, however, start Avions Voisin, one of the world’s most prestigious automotive brands of the day.

The one-off MyLord was only a concept vehicle and never saw full production, making this example the only one in existence. It was treated to a full restoration before heading to the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance auction block in 2010. One fortunate bidder took home the MyLord, leaving a $2,750,000 check in its place.

Click past the jump to learn more about the Voisin C20 MyLord Demi-Berline

Posted on by TB +  

"Iconic" is a word that is thrown around far too often in the automotive world, but after 100 years and dozens of colors and text styles, the lasting importance and brand symbol of the Chevy bowtie emblem is a sure thing.

As the bowtie evolved over the ten decades, its transformations were barely noticeable versus the complete revolution in transport they adorned - from the first Chevy ’Classic Six’ model to today’s industrial heavy-hitter with more than 50 global model lines.

General Motors’ Chevrolet brand was launched with a script logo with the words Chevrolet written in stylized cursive.

Legibility and pronunciation of this French name were a real problem versus monosyllabic "Fords " across the street.

Soon, a baby blue bowtie logo appeared along with Chevrolet written in all caps in 1913, but the exact origins of this bowtie are unknown.

What we do know is that the Chevy bowtie instantly means cars.

Along with Ford , Coca Cola and General Electric, the emblem of the Chevrolet lineup is a globally-recognized symbol of freedom, prestige and mobility.

Logo changes are often fraught with peril for the companies who fail to understand the symbol’s importance to their most loyal consumers. Just a brief look back shows disastrous results followed when Gap Inc. tried to remodel their emblem, or the huge drop in real-life sales following Tropicana’s disastrous package redesign.

With the new 2014 Cadillac logo (without the wreath!) in place on the Elmiraj Concept , here’s a look back at the evolution of the Chevrolet bowtie over the Chevrolet bowtie over the last hundred years.

Click past the jump for the full Chevy’s BowTie Emblem Turns 100, Reflects On Badge’s Evolution article - to find out the most likely source of the bowtie emblem.

Updated 10/14/2013: This article has been updated with Chevy’s latest skinny emblem, which the original article did not highlight as the new bowtie in use since 2010.

Posted on by TB +  

Dream cars are such a regular and normal part of every car guy and gal’s life growing up. Waiting for that license, dreaming about the wild places you will go and friends you might meet. For generations of enthusiasts until the 1950s, however, such dreams were so unattainable they were foolish.

The only non-mass-market car around was the coach-built Phaeton from Rolls-Royce , Mercedes-Benz or Duesenberg .

Such was the gulf between the rich and poor at the time that it makes today’s 99-percent protests seem as ridiculous as they are. In those days, the ratio was more like 99.99999 percent versus the 0.00001 percent.

You can probably guess which group we and most young car shoppers would fall into. And it is not the one with the nines.

For a generation of hot-shot former military officers, pilots and engineers: coming home from the battle fronts of Europe and the Pacific had whet their appetites for speed. The enormous volume of men and women enchanted by steel machinery during wartime was unprecedented.

But coming home, the cars these speed demons found were lumbering, great heavy beasts with no power and little cornering ability whatsoever. These men were chasing the rush they felt in fighter bombers - but in a stylish and affordable package.

The Corvette from 1953 was the answer to these wishes and much, much more. Initially just a throw-away concept for the Motorama events, such was the demand that Chevy had no choice but to produce the car for sale.

But those shapes could never be made in steel! And never made in time to get the car to eager buyers. So a stop-gap solution was born to make the panels out of fiberglass over a ladder frame chassis. Little did the fabricators know, this template would underpin America’s sports car for the next 75 years or more.

The Chevrolet Corvette C1 is a very special automobile. Collected here are three incredible examples of this ground-breaking achievement for affordable dream cars ever since.

Click past the jump for this debrief of the 1953-1962 Chevrolet Corvette C1.

As Mercedes ’ flagship model since roughly the beginning of time, the Mercedes S-Class has always been at the forefront of the automaker’s technological advancements. In a lot of ways, it was ahead of the curve and contained features that would eventually move down to the company’s other models.

At last month’s Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance , Mercedes took the unprecedented step of showcasing all of its S-Class models, including a number of iconic models that have since been given the classic treatment.

But the best part about this showcase was that Mercedes was able to capture it on video, giving all of us a chance to relive the legendary history of the company’s flagship model dating back to its infancy. There are a lot in there that were released way before any of us were born, so you can understand how reverential we treat some of these models.

Click past the jump to read about the latest model to be bestowed the S-Class designation, the recently revealed 2013 Mercedes S-Class Coupe Concept


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