Honda

Honda cars

Honda’s sports car lineup has become a lot clearer today. We already know the NSX is coming and the same for the diminutive S660 sports coupe. Now, Motoring Australia is reporting that Honda has given the green light to bring back the S2000 . Pop open the metaphorical champagne, ladies and gentlemen, Honda’s recently discontinued sports car is coming back!

Okay, let me pump the brakes up a little bit. Technically, this sports car won’t be packaged as a direct successor to the S2000. Remember, the S2000 was a front-engine mounted sports car that broke out in the 2000 model year and was produced until 2009. The new S2000 will be developed with a mid-mounted engine setup. This setup is similar to what Honda is preparing for the NSX and the S660, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise to see the new S2000 adopt the same setup.

Motoring Australia also said that the new S2000 will adopt similar styling to the NSX and the S660, including wraparound headlights, large side air intakes, and flared wheel arches. This could point to a more robust design for the S2000, as opposed to the sleek, bullet-like look of the model’s previous incarnation.

The same report also indicated that the new rear-wheel drive S2000 will employ a modified version of the 2.0-liter, turbocharged, four-cylinder engine that currently takes residence under the Honda Civic Type-R’s hood. An electric motor is also expected to be slapped into the car, ensuring a total output of around 365 horsepower and mated to a seven-speed, dual-clutch automatic transmission.

Honda is also reportedly planning to produce the new S2000 at its Performance Manufacturing Center in the U.S. This little detail is important because that’s where the NSX will also be built, which means that there’s a possibility that the S2000 receives the same production materials as its big bro.

What’s still unclear is when the new S2000 will arrive. By all indications, a launch in late 2017 sounds like a fair estimate of the sports car’s development timeline.

For now, we’re not concentrating on that as much as the report that a spiritual successor to the Honda S2000 is officially coming.

Note: Last-generation Honda S2000 pictured here.

Click past the jump to read more about the Honda S2000.

Source: Motoring

Honda introduced the CR-V in 1995. The crossover was based on the Honda Civic and came with front-wheel or all-wheel drive. Built until 2001, the first-gen CR-V came to the United States in 1997 and had a 2.0-liter, four-cylinder engine rated at 126 horsepower. A 1999 facelift saw power increase to 147 ponies, as Honda responded to criticism that the crossover was underpowered. The second-gen model arrived in 2001 with extensive visual and technology upgrades. Three new engines were introduced, including a 2.4-liter inline-four. The CR-V was redesigned yet again for the 2007 model year, when production of the crossover began at the company’s new East Liberty, Ohio plant. The fourth-gen CR-V debuted at the 2011 Los Angeles Auto Show and went on sale for 2012. In 2014, the vehicle is powered by a 2.4-liter, four-banger producing 185 horsepower and 163 pound-feet of torque. As we move into 2015, the current CR-V is getting ready to receive a facelift, which will arrive in dealerships for the 2016 model year.

Revised front and rear fascia, an updated interior and an enhanced engine are the main feats surrounding this mid-cycle upgrade.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Honda CR-V.

When the first NSX debuted, Honda was using it as a weapon to challenge the power of Ferrari on the track. For all intents and purposes, the new NSX will serve the same purpose, but I think Honda has taken it a bit too far. You may have noticed that there have been more than a few stories about Ferrari’s randomly bursting into flames around the world, and Honda was not going to be outshone. We now have news that the NSX prototype we just saw testing on the Nurburgring has also burst into flames.

Obviously, it is sad news that the NSX production mule has been destroyed, but it’s mildly comical when put into the context of the decades long battle against its Italian rival.

Thankfully it doesn’t appear that anyone was hurt in the fire, but the NSX does look to be a complete loss. Most of the rear body work has been burnt to nothing and what is left doesn’t exactly look salvageable.

I sure hope Honda has a backup if it plans on getting enough testing done to have this car on sale by next summer.

Click past the jump to read more about the future Honda NSX.

It seems that Honda’s constant back-and-forth on whether or not to build a new NSX is over, as we have spy shots of a production version making laps at the Nordschliefe.

I bet that last sentence just brightened up your day, didn’t it?

Covered in camo and blasting around the Green Hell, it appears that the NSX — branded as an Acura in the U.S. — with hit showrooms looking almost exactly as it did when it was first unveiled a few years ago. We expect the car to roll into dealers sometime in the summer of 2015 with a turbocharged, V-6 engine and one of the most advanced all-wheel-drive systems in the world. Considering that V-6 is supposed to make more than 400 horsepower, we might finally have a car with the potential to dethrone the incredible Nissan GT-R .

Now that we have production cars hitting the ‘Ring, there should be a LOT more info coming soon. Keep your eyes here on TopSpeed.com for all the news as we get it.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2016 Honda (Acura) NSX.

In 2007, Honda rebadged its useful and popular Jazz model as the Fit and released it in America. Americans immediately took notice, as the unstable prices in fuel led us to start looking at smaller vehicles. What’s more, the debut Fit also had a massive 57-cubic-foot cargo area that no other compact hatchbacks could come close to. In 2015 — after a one-year break — the Fit returns with an all-new look, new cabin, updated engine, and a huge increase in rear-seat room.

I spent a week behind the wheel of the range-topping 2015 Fit EX-L — the first Fit to feature leather upholstery — and came away mighty impressed. The roominess was out of this world, the cargo area was incredible and the smattering of features were nice additions. As with most entry-level cars with leather interior, this was the sore spot in the whole thing. The leather seemed haphazardly slapped over cloth and hard plastic, leaving some fit and finish issues, and black leather is simply unbearable in the summer.

the real question is whether the iffy leather left a bad taste in my mouth or were the good parts of this compact hatch enough to make me overlook my problems with the cow hide?

Click past the jump to read my Driven review on the 2015 Fit and find out.

The current-generation Honda Civic is enjoying great success in the United States, where it is offered in both sedan and coupe body styles, which are powered by gasoline, natural gas, or even a hybrid powertrain. On the other side of the Atlantic, however, the hatchback version of the Civic, which Honda has yet to bring Stateside, just had its cool factor enhanced by means of a menacing special-edition model.

Dubbed Black Edition and wrapped in a triple black exterior that would make a 1970 Plymouth Roadrunner burst with anger, the new addition to Honda’s U.K. lineup is restricted to Great Britain, where it joins similar special-edition versions of the CR-V crossover and the Jazz hatchback (sold as Fit in the United States). Suddenly, it seems like the United Kingdom is a great place to be if you’re a Honda enthusiast.

But before we start feeling sorry for not getting it in the United States, let’s have a closer look and find out what the Civic Black Edition is all about.

Click past the jump to read more about the Honda Civic Black Edition.

The Honda S2000 debuted in 2000 and harked back to Honda’s sports cars of years past, including the S500, S600, and S800. The S2000 was a tuner’s dream, as it weighed just 2,800 pounds, had 240 horses and a chassis that was on par with the Miata. The unfortunate side of the original S2000 was that the horsepower didn’t peak until 8,300 and it could only muster up 153 pound-feet of torque. By time the 2009 model year rolled around, the S2000 had run its course and went the way of the dodo bird, but not before Honda Performance Development decided to add a lot more displacement to the roadster’s engine compartment as an experiment.

With a 3.7-liter, V-6 engine HPD presents the creatively named S3700. This V-6 engine a production unit that was sourced from the Acura lineup. In its home engine bay, this engine developed 300 to 305 horsepower and 273 to 275 pound-feet of twist, depending on the application, but Honda failed to reveal what the output is for this Pikes Peak racer. I did learn that back in 2009 when HPD built the first S3700, it had a 9.55-to-1 power to weight ratio. Given the 2,825-pound weight of the original S3700, my math says that this engine produced 296 horsepower. It’s safe to assume that this version of the S3700 will retain that output.

We only have a single image to show you, but as you can see, this Pikes Peak racer dons a white base coat with a red racing stripe down the driver side of the car. Also present it a hefty bulge in its hood to make room for the larger, V-6 engine and large lip spoiler under the nose.

Stay tuned to TopSpeed.com and we’ll bring you new details as HPD reveals them.

Hello everyone! I hope you guys have had a great week so far and are very excited for the TopSpeed Podcast. This week is Episode 016 and I have a few surprises for you guys.

At some point in the show, I am going to let everyone know how they can get some cool Gumball 3000 gear. I came home with of lots of stickers, key chains, T-shirts and some other cool swag, and I am going to be giving most of it away. You have to watch or listen to the show to figure out how to get it though.

We are start the show off with Mark and Justin talking about what they have been driving over the last week. That means the Civic Si and the expensive Range Rover Autobigraphy . I meanwhile wax poetically about the V-10 wail of the Lamborghini Gallardo as it bounces off the rev-limiter. You don’t want to miss that part.

For news we discuss the continued recovery of Michael Schumacher , Nissan’s new GT-R based concept car and the possibility of an RX-8 replacement from Mazda. We also fit some Aston Martin news in as well.

We even take the chance to talk a bit about what will be happening at Goodwood.

After the news, we have a few questions to answer from you guys about company collaborations and special edition custom cars like Ferrari’s many SP models.

We wrap up the show with Own, Drive, Burn for a trio of far out supercar concepts.

We hope you guys enjoyed the show. As always, feel free to send us any comments, questions or concerns. We love to hear it all.

See you next week.

When the Civic debuted in 1973, we were just coming out of the muscle-car era and the strangulation of the American V-8 had begun. Much like the V-8 engines of the era, the Civic’s 1,169-cc, inline-four engine produced all of 50 ponies. In 1986, Honda ventured into the performance world with the Civic, as it introduced the performance-oriented Si hatchback . With 91 horsepower and 93 pound-feet in tow, the debut Civic Si could hit 60 mph in around 10 seconds and still deliver 30 mpg on the highway. The 2014 Civic Si Sedan has more than twice the power of its distant sibling, and delivers unexpected pop for a naturally aspirated model.

I recently spent a week behind the wheel of a 2014 Honda Civic Si Sedan, and gave it the flogging it so loudly cried for. With its rev-happy four-cylinder, 18-inch wheels and close-ratio six-speed manual, the Civic Si Sedan seems to be — on paper at least — the perfect combination for gearheads with a family and a lighter wallet.

Click past the jump to see what I think of the 2014 Civic Si Sedan .

Facelifted for the 2012 model year, the Honda Pilot SUV remained basically unchanged for 2014 , keeping its boring, highly criticized exterior looks. Now if you were hoping that will change for 2015, then you’d better start relaxing those fingers, because the boxy, three-row SUV is holding onto its current specifications for one more year.

There is a notable change in the Pilot lineup, however, coming in the shape of a brand-new Special Edition trim. Sounds familiar? It should, because we’re talking about the same strategy Honda pushed with the aging Ridgeline pickup truck last year.

Essentially a well-equipped model fitted with a couple of exclusive features, the Pilot SE resides between the EX and the EX-L trims and can be had in both two-wheel and four-wheel-drive configurations. The Special Edition benefits from the same 3.5-liter V-6 engine as the rest of the Pilot lineup, meaning it can carry up to eight people and tow up to 4,500 pounds with input from 250 horsepower and 253 pound-feet of torque.

In charge with transferring the power to the wheels is a five-speed automatic transmission with Grade Logic Control. The unit can be paired with Honda’s VTM four-wheel-drive system for AWD capability. Helping the SUV cope with tougher terrain is a fully independent suspension with a MacPherson strut at the front and a multi-link unit with trailing arm to the rear.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Honda Pilot Special Edition.


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