hybrid cars

hybrid cars

  A hybrid vehicle uses multiple propulsion systems to provide motive power. This most commonly refers to gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles, which use gasoline (petrol) and electric batteries to power internal-combustion engines (ICEs) and electric motors.

Posted on by Austin Taylor  

Toyota , a known force to be reckoned with in the alternative-fuel automotive world, is releasing its zero-emission hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, aptly named the FCV, in the summer of 2015. Limited to California initially, Toyota asserts an impressive 310-mile range. Also, the company has announced a partnership with FirstElement Fuels, to make refilling more convenient, with 19 new hydrogen refueling stations coming to the California area. Expect 100 stations in a decade’s time. Also, Toyota claims that re-filling will only take five minutes; significantly quicker than a recharge in a Tesla or Nissan leaf , also zero-emission vehicles.

Out here in California, the newest fad is always in the spotlight, and this new FCV should certainly turn a few heads and make people take notice. Also, being a zero-emission vehicle, it will be eligible for Carpool Lane access. And, hey, anything to shave a few minutes off an LA commute is invaluable. Take it from this Los Angeleno.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Toyota FCV.

Porsche did it. McLaren did it. Heck, the previously stubborn Ferrari did it. Now it appears that Bugatti is also considering doing it. By "it," I mean hybrid, or to be more specific, a hybrid supercar.

Reuters is reporting that the extravagant supercar brand is throwing around the idea of using a hybrid system to power the successor to the Bugatti Veyron. For a company that prides itself on those mammoth, 16-cylinder engines, a move to a hybrid powertrain is as surprising as it was inconceivable a few years ago.

But Bugatti CEO Wolfgang Duerheimier is reportedly angling to use a hybrid engine on the Veyron’s successor. It’s unclear if he’s doing this to jump on the bandwagon his competitors are in, but there’s no denying that his position was made because of the reception the Porsche 918 Spyder , the McLaren P1 , and the Ferrari LaFerrari have all received.

One thing we do know is that the Veyron successor won’t compromise its performance ethos in the name of using a hybrid engine. The supercar is still expected to be more powerful than its predecessor, possibly generating an output in excess of 1,500 horsepower. It’s also being prepped to eclipse the 267-mph top speed of the Veyron Super Sport and even reclaim the unofficial top speed record from the Hennessey Venom GT .

As Porsche, McLaren, and Ferrari have shown, there’s a place for hybrid systems in the supercar world. Bugatti has spent some time watching its competitors roll out their products one after the other.

It’s the Bugatti’s turn now and don’t be surprised to see the Veyron’s successor packing its own efficient hybrid system .

Click past the jump to read more about Bugatti’s future hybrid supercar.

Source: Reuters

Hypermileing is a growing trend these days as folks try to conserve as much fuel and money as possible. But even the best efforts are vain attempts when compared to a driver with a good tool. Turns out, the best tool (most efficient) is the upcoming Mercedes-Benz E 300 BlueTEC Hybrid . Fitted with a diesel engine, an electric hybrid drive system, and the factory-optional large-capacity fuel tank, the E 300 BlueTEC Hybrid can drive an amazing 1,223 miles on one tank of fuel.

The feat was accomplished by British automotive journalist Andrew Frankel in a massive undertaking of driving from Tangier in Northern Africa to the United Kingdom. The journey trekked through two continents, four countries, and three time zones in a total of 27 hours of drive time.

Frankel and the E 300 BlueTEC Hybrid’s final destination was the Goodwood Festival of Speed , slotted to show off the car’s amazing fuel efficiency and range at the ‘First Glance’ paddock. Even with hitting heavy rain and thick traffic, the car still averaged 73.6 mpg. The larger, 21-gallon fuel tank used is a regular factory option, costing £100, or roughly $170 U.S. dollars as of 7/1/2014, helped ensure the trip would be completed without a single fuel stop.

When Frankel arrived at Goodwood, the fuel readout still showed another 100 miles worth of driving range. If he’d kept driving, the E 300 BlueTEC Hybrid could have potentially covered 1,323 miles of road without a single stop.

Click past the jump to read more about the Mercedes-Benz E-Class .

Posted on by Simona  

Volkswagen ’s dream of developing a 235-mpg car (1 liter per 100 kilometers) has finally been realized, as the new XL1 will be making its world debut at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show. To make things even better, the first details have been released today. Volkswagen describes it as "a spectacular appearance – a car of the future, built for today."

On the exterior, the model remains pretty much identical to the concept unveiled at the 2011 Qatar Motor Show, including those cool gullwing doors. Still, the car is a little bit better than VW hoped, because its fuel consumption goes down to an impressive 0.9 liters per 100 kilometers, or 261 U.S. mpg.

The model will be unveiled next month at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show and the first production batch will consist of just 50 units, with any other unit being developed on demand.

Updated 6/27/2014: Volkswagen has announced that the XL1 is ready for launch, and the first car was delivered to a German buyer in May 2014. It is also now available in the UK at £98,515 ($167,736 as of 6/27/2014) on the road.

Hit the jump to read more about the new Volkswagen XL1.

As soon as the California T started revving its turbocharged, V-8 engine, we began to wonder how long will it take before Ferrari starts adding turbos across its entire lineup. Well, it appears all V-8s are set to receive forced induction over the next six years, as the Italians want to reduce their fleet CO2 emission by 20 percent by 2021.

That’s the word coming from Ferrari Powetrain Director Vittorio Dini, who said Maranello needs to reduce emissions by three percent each year and by 20 percent by 2021, Automotive News reports. To achieve this daring goal, the company will turbocharge its V-8 engines and develop hybrid technology for each V-12-powered supercar . Additionally, V-8 engine displacement is to decreased, meaning no unit larger than the current 3.9-liter V-8 will be available once Fezza retires the 4.5-liter unit.

Ferrari’s average CO2 emissions are currently about 270 grams of CO2 per kilometer. Ferrari is one of many manufacturer that obtained derogations from the European Environment Agency in recent years, alongside Aston Martin , Spyker , Koenigsegg , and Lotus . For the record, companies such as Fiat , Renault , and Peugeot average less than 120 grams of CO2 per kilometer.

Click past the jump to read more about Ferrari’s new hybrid system.

Audi ’s brand-new electric turbodiesel engine, which was showcased in the RS5 TDI Concept last month, is set to become more than just an experiment. That’s the word from Australian outlet Drive, which claims the drivetrain will hit the streets in the next-generation Q7 SUV . Needless to say, we are not surprised.

The said oil burner displaces 3.0 liters and features an all-new e-boost unit that provides maximum torque from just 1,250 rpm, until the regular turbo kicks in at 3,000 rpm. This technology eliminates turbo lag, and enables the diesel to perform better and respond quicker when the gas pedal hits the floor.

The concept version of the engine mounted in the RS5 TDI delivers 385 horsepower and 553 pound-feet of torque. That’s enough to push the coupe from naught to 62 mph in only four seconds and label it as the fastest six-cylinder diesel vehicle ever developed within the Volkswagen Group . We expect these numbers to change once the production engine finds its way into the Q7’s bay, but the SUV should be quite the performer.

Click past the jump to read more about this technology and the Audi RS5 TDI Concept.

Source: Drive

A hybrid version of the Toyota GT86 isn’t part of Toyota’s future plans, putting to rest rumors that the company could use the technology to offer a different, higher-performing version of the GT86. The decision to set aside a hybrid GT86 was reportedly made because it didn’t make sense from a business perspective.

Toyota marketing director Fabio Capano told Autocar that the Japanese automaker has no plans of building a hybrid GT86 despite company engineers admitting that the technology is already at an advanced stage of development. If there were a business case to be made for the vehicle, Toyota would think long and hard about green lighting it. But like most companies, Toyota wants to prioritize its time and money in pursuing other projects and a hybrid GT86 isn’t on top of its "to-do" list. So why even bother, right?

If demand for a hybrid Toyota GT86 doesn’t justify the time and effort, then why would Toyota build it in the first place? Additionally, The GT86 prides itself on being an affordable sports car with adequate power behind it. Launching a hybrid version of the model could end up cannibalizing sales of the base sports car and other future endeavors, like the return of the Supra .

Instead, Toyota is focusing on using its "advanced" hybrid technology on a car that’s more suited for it. The long-rumored sports car collaboration with BMW is one such car that could make the most of a hybrid powertrain.

Source: AutoCar

The Porsche 918 Spyder is a rare supercar that can speak a number of languages very few of its contemporaries can even comprehend let alone understand. It’s a daunting task just trying to decipher the car’s fullest capabilities, but for what Porsche managed to build, it also turned out to be a watershed moment for the future of the industry.

Recently, the Drive channel was able to get its hands on the Porsche hybrid hypercar, and like everybody who has felt its pulsating power, Drive’s Mike Spinelli was taken for a thrill ride for the ages.

Everything that makes the 918 Spyder so unique is displayed front and center, unleashing one wave after another of breathtaking displays of power and speed wrapped in a cocoon of the finest technology known in the industry today.

It’s hard to throw so many superlatives at just one car because there is usually disappointment along the way, however the 918 Spyder bucks that way of thinking for all the reasons that put the 918 into its current slot-on-top to begin with.

It really is the supercar of the future, in more ways than one.

There’s been a lot of talk about Porsche ’s purported plans to drop an electric motor into the 911 , but the Germans are doing a wonderful job at keeping all the details under wraps. In fact, Stuttgart is quieter than a Tesla Model S when it comes to 911 hybridization .

Fortunately, and because we’re living in an age dominated by state-of-the-art technology, Porsche’s steps are carefully monitored by high-performance photo lenses and recording devices. The Nurburgring track is packed with spies waiting to snap shots of the latest prototypes and test cars, so it’s only natural for us to hope for an alert paparazzo to blow the 911 hybrid’s cover.

And although we didn’t expect for that to happen anytime soon, it appears Porsche might be testing a hybrid 911 at the German track as we speak. Spotted earlier this month on the Nordschleife, the 911 shown in the video above looks like any other Carrera S you can buy nowadays. However, a device found on the back seat, as well as the high-pitched noise coming out during shifting accelerating, suggest this is no regular 911.

Of course, there’s no guarantee that the electrical equipment inside the sports car isn’t just a telemetry device, but the unusual noises are noticeable and they must mean something. One thing’s for sure though, if the 911 lapping the ’Ring with that gizmo attached to it is indeed a hybrid, development has barely commenced and there’s plenty of footage to follow.

As a quick reminder, we expect the 911 hybrid to carry a turbocharged, 560-horsepower flat-six engine and an electric motor sourced from the 918 Hybrid supercar , a combo that creates more than 700 ponies. And that’s an upsetting figure for both Ferrari and Lamborghini .

If you’re a regular listener to our TopSpeed Podcasts, you’re likely familiar with our affinity with high-tech halo cars and the benefits they bring to less expensive, more everyday cars by technology trickle-down. Well, it appears Porsche is planning to share a few of the 918 hybrid hyper car’s parts with an upcoming version of the 911 Turbo S, and the Panamera Turbo S.

Why add a hybrid system to a car as seamless as the 911? The benefits are numerous and often obvious, but sometimes can be more obscure. The easiest positive to recognize is more horsepower. Adding the 918’s 156-horsepower electric motor to the 911 Turbo S’ 560-horsepower flat six results in a possible 716-horsepower hybrid drivetrain. That would help the 911 run the ‘ring with the latest Lamborghinis and Ferraris out there.

On the more obscure side, adding a plug-in hybrid system would allow the 911 to drive within Europe’s future Zero-Emissions Zones where conventional engines are banned in congested urban environments. Switch to full-electric mode, and the car becomes legal to drive downtown.

What’s more, it shouldn’t be difficult for Porsche to tailor the e-Hybrid system for not just the 911 and Panamera, but for other vehicles in the future. It’s possible for the trickle-down to continue further into even more affordable vehicles like the Cayman and Boxster, but only after the development and hardware costs come down. This not only helps Porsche’s overall CAFE ratings, but helps boost horsepower ratings and performance standards as well.

It sounds like a win-win to us.

Click past the jump to read more about the current Porsche 911 Turbo S.

Source: MotorTrend

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