jay leno garage

jay leno garage

Jay is riding low in this episode of Jay Leno’s Garage . Our legendary petrol-head host meets up with three low rider aficionados who take Jay through the ins and outs of low rider tech and history. The two beautiful low rider examples are a black, 1966 Chevrolet Impala and a pinstriped 1963 Chevy Impala Convertible. Both are completely customized with unique parts and outstanding chrome work.

Jay starts off talking with the editor of Lowrider Magazine, Joe Ray, about how the low-rider culture got its start back in the 1960s and how it’s spreading all over the world today.

After that, Jay talks with Chris Najera, the owner of the black 1966 Impala about why he kept a solid paint color and how he modernized a few key bits of the interior. Under the hood lies an absolutely beautiful V-8 drenched in chrome and brimming with power.

Brandon Brusca then shows Jay nearly every inch of his candy-colored orange 1963 Impala Convertible. Every single inch of the car is completely customized. The pinstriped paint job runs the entire length of the car and exemplified automotive artistic craftsmanship. A 409-cubic-inch V-8 burbles between pinstriped inner fender wells and is covered in chrome.

Jay continues to take a look at the ’63 Impala, but from the underside, where the craftsmanship and attention to detail matches that of the top side. There are even engravings on the chrome-plated link bars for the rear suspension. Every nut, every bolt, and every connector is shined to meticulous perfection.

The kicker to it all is the ’63 Impala’s air-suspension system. It utilizes air compressors originally built in the 1960s for U.S. fighter planes. The video might be long, but it’s worth your time, even if you’re not into the low-rider scene.

Yet another episode of Jay Leno’s Garage has hit the comedian’s YouTube channel and this one is all about the details. Jay and his Corvette -expert friend Mike McCluskey take a deep dive into the rare 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray that Mike painstakingly restored to factory specifications. Everything from the radiator hoses to the flat-top bolt holding the master cylinder’s lid on tight are talked about.

As it turns out, the 21,000 1963 Sting Rays made were nearly hand-built and each car can almost be considered a concept car . The 1963’s parts differed so greatly from the previous generation that the designers and engineers essentially designed it as they went. Then in 1964, the car’s assembly process was smoothed out, making them easier to build. The ‘63’s hubcaps, for example, are comprised of 17 separate pieces rather than the single stamping piece used from ’64 on.

Besides the 1963’s rarity, especially for its one-year-only split-window design, the car also helped mark the beginning of fuel injection in American cars. Until that time, only a select few European cars came equipped with such a fuel delivery device. Jay’s particular Sting Ray is powered by a 327-cubic-inch small-block making 360 horsepower. That’s an output rating well beyond what other performance cars of the era were making.

Though it’s 22 minutes long, the video holds your attention with facts and interesting tid-bits that only make the C2 Sting Ray that much more special to today’s car culture.

If you’ve never missed an episode of Jay Leno’s Garage, the latest one is an awfully bad place to start. In this episode, Leno talks about the Mille Miglia, the legendary Italian open-road endurance race ran 24 times from 1927 to 1957 before changing its format in 1977 as a regular race for classic and vintage cars . Being a student of automotive racing history, Leno knows everything there is to know about the Mille Miglia. In this episode, he puts all that to use as we’re taken on a comprehensive look behind the history and extravagance of this legendary 1,000-mile race.

In between interviews with the likes of Stirling Moss and Martin Brundle, Leno also spent some time at the 2014 Mille Miglia with Jaguar Design Director Ian Callum.

The Mille Miglia isn’t what it used to be, having been changed to a more relaxed event that’s more about showcasing the classic cars of old than it is trying to beat them. Still, Leno managed to capture magic of Mille Miglia the way nobody else can, and that translated to arguably one of the best episodes of Jay Leno’s Garage.

Be sure to have some time for this episode because it gives you a first-class education at one of the most dangerous racing events in the history of the sport.

Although enthusiasts regard the E-Type as the most iconic and beautiful Jaguars ever built, I think there’s at least one other Jag that can match its distinction. I’m talking about the XKSS, a limited-edition, two-seat roadster based on the D-Type race car.

My reasoning is pretty much simple here. The XKSS has the gorgeous looks of the 1950s Jaguars, the racing heritage of the Le Mans-winning D-Type , and a track-prepped structure coming straight from the company’s motorsport division. Add the fact that Jag built only 16 of these sports cars , and you’ll understand why the XKSS is a coveted and expensive collectible.

The XKSS also benefits from an association with famed American actor Steve McQueen , who owned a British Racing Green-pained example and drove it around Los Angeles for years. Now resting its wheels in the Peterson Automotive Museum, McQueen’s Jag just took a trip to Jay Leno’s garage , the place where the world’s greatest vehicles are taken to be reviewed and showcased.

But unlike other cars that have passed through his garage, the XKSS seems to have mesmerized Leno, as the TV host can’t stop praising the roadster enough throughout the 20-minute episode. Just hit the play button and you’ll find out what we mean.

The perks of being Jay Leno seemingly has no bounds these days. Whereas most of us would call it a lucky day just to own a car that has four wheels and takes us from point A to point B, Leno’s definition of a lucky day is finally receiving the McLaren P1 .

Oh, to be that guy.

In the latest episode of Jay Leno’s Garage, Leno finally gets his hands on his personal P1 and proceeds to make the rest of the auto world green with envy with his proclamation that he had already put "1,000 miles" on it. Care to give us a ride in that mighty machine, Jay?

But the real meat of the episode focused on his guest, Mike Flewitt, CEO of McLaren Automotive. Together, the two talked shop about McLaren Automotive’s history and the success the company has had since it first introduced the F1 a little over 20 years ago. From there, the discussion eventually moved to the P1, the company’s latest supercar that has pretty much exceeded all the expectations everyone has set on it since the time development began. He also tried to trick Flewitt into revealing the rumored 7-minute Nurburgring time of the P1.

Or as Leno puts it, the P1 has made even the most hardened of auto journalists "gush over it like school children." To that, we can’t argue with him.

Check out the rest of the episode as Jay takes his new P1 out for a drive on the streets of Los Angeles. Chances are, you’d be dying to ride shotgun by the time the episode’s over.

Although the first automobile built on an assembly line – the Ford Model T – is about 106 years old, the history of the self-propelled vehicle goes all the way back to 1769, when a French inventor created a steam-powered tricycle.

Revised over the next hundred year, this external combustion engine concept was eventually used by a number of U.S.-based automakers until the more efficient gasoline powered was perfected. Most steam car manufacturers are rather anonymous today, but there’s one particular name that stands out – Doble.

Founded in Detroit by Abner Doble, the said company built steam cars between 1909 through 1931, with their latter models, which used electric starters and fast firing boilers, being considered the pinnacle of steam car development.

The Doble E-20, for instance, was able to reach top speeds of up to 132 mph in 1925, matching the performance figures offered by very few internal combustion cars of that era, one of them being Duesenberg . Dobles are a very rare sight nowadays, but one very lucky E-20 model found a home in Jay Leno’s garage , where all sorts of vehicles ranging from vintage steam cars to the latest supercars are known to rest their wheels.

This episode is an awesome history lesson on Doble vehicles, as Leno not only takes the E-20 for a drive, but also explains the mechanics underneath its body. You obviously won’t get any V-8 action in this one, but it’s a piece worth watching if you’re into the more obscure side of the automotive industry.

Some of us consider buying a new pair of Jordans as money well spent. But for a guy like Jay Leno , Jordans just don’t cut it anymore. If you want to get this guy all giddy, he needs to buy something he really wants, which in this case happens to be a McLaren P1 .

Recently, Leno was captured taking the P1 out to stretch its legs and by looking at how excited he was just by getting out of it, you can tell that Leno already has a soft spot for this incredible piece of British engineering. If it weren’t so big, we would have thought he’s been hugging it in bed every night since he received it.

The McLaren P1 is a legitimate bad-ass, one that’s capable of producing a staggering 903 horsepower and 1,100 pound-feet of torque. That allows the P1 to cover 0-to-60 mph in just 2.7 seconds, faster than some of us can move our foot from the brake to the gas pedal when a traffic light turns green. Top speed is at 217 mph, which pretty much means it’s ridiculously fast.

Have you noticed how most Toyotas are boring by design, while the company’s concept cars are usually groundbreaking and spectacular? Here, have a look at the 2014 Toyota FCV concept and then take a peek at the Camry sedan . See what I mean?

Well, this enormous concept-to-production gap might be narrowed in the near future, as the Japanese manufacturer is one step away from reviving the iconic Supra nameplate with the FT-1 concept as its base (have another look at our recent renderings for a refresh).

Of course, we’re not expecting Toyota to make the production car as mean looking and aggressive as the aforementioned design study, but the final result is bound to have a big impact on the industry. It might as well be the next Lexus LFA , but with a Toyota badge on its nose and with a greater "wow" factor attached to it. And the LFA is hard to beat!

Now I know all of you sports car enthusiasts are just dying to see this new product alive and kicking, but you’ll have to keep your shirts on for a little while longer, as Toyota has yet to reveal its plans with the next Supra.

Meanwhile, the stunning FT-1 concept took a trip across town from the Calty Design Research workshop to Jay Leno’s Garage , where California’s biggest car collector sat down and had a chat with two of the main men behind the project.

Leno is obviously impressed with the FT-1’s design, claiming the new concept car could spawn something truly impressive. Unfortunately, he doesn’t get to drive it, as he does with most of the vehicles that drop by his garage, for obvious reasons, but the video reveals some interesting facts about the car.

Now go ahead and enjoy the video and make sure you stay tuned to TopSpeed for more info on the upcoming Toyota Supra.

Having taken delivery of his brand new McLaren P1 supercar — the first US-spec version to cross the Pond — Jay Leno is probably busy driving Britain’s most anticipated vehicle for the 2014 model year as we speak. And we bet he’s grinning from ear to ear while with all 903 horsepower at his disposal.

Coincidentally, the most recent episode of Jay Leno’s Garage also focuses on a British car. One that comes from a different era and in a package that’s more about lightness and precision handling than extreme horsepower. We’re talking about the Lotus Elan 26R.

Launched in 1963, the Elan was a small sports car that measured only 145 inches in length and tipped the scales at just 1,516 pounds. To draw a better picture of what the Elan was about, the third-gen Mazda MX-5 is about 158 inches long and weighs around 2,500 pounds.

Developed using Colin Chapman’s "simplify, then add lightness" design, the featherweight Elan didn’t need more than a 1.6-liter, inline-four engine and 105 horsepower to take on public roads or race tracks at high speeds. Of course, the tiny vehicle quickly became a popular race car .

Getting back to Jay Leno, he already owned a 1969 Lotus Elan, but his garage lacked a track-prepped 26R. That hole was obviously filled recently, when Jim Hall completed the roadster you’re about to see in the video above. The project started from a regular 1966 Elan, which means we’re not dealing with an authentic 26R, but judging by the amount of work it was put into the roadster, it’s safe to assume that Leno’s right by saying this is "the ultimate Elan".

Jay Leno’s garage is never short on amazing vehicles with loads of historical or performance pedigrees melded into every component. But Jay’s latest guest car is a vehicle with loads of future potential for the mainstream market, though it’s not much to look at.

Starting with a stock Euro-spec Ford Focus , the folks at Ricardo replaced the car’s standard 2.0-liter Duratec inline four cylinder with a 1.0-liter I-4 with a few tricks up its sleeve. The engine features a regular turbocharger, along with an electric supercharger in a setup much like the McLaren P1 . (Ricardo helped develop the battery management software for the P1) Designed as a torque fill, the supercharger is powered by electricity stored in super capacitors. Once the driver hits the gas, the supercharger responds within 200 milliseconds, providing boost until the turbo spools up. Once the turbo is pressurized, the supercharger is turned off.

A belt-starter generator running off the engine powers the super capacitors. And because the 1.0-liter is has a stop/start feature, the capacitors also power the belt-starter generator to restart the engine.

Perhaps the two most impressive aspects of the HyBoost system are its efficiency and overall cost. The old 2.0-liter engine averaged around 32 mpg, but the HyBoost improves on that by an impressive 47 percent – meaning the new powertrain achieves roughly 47 to 50 mpg and nearly 60 mpg highway. Then there’s cost. Somehow, Ricardo is potentially able to include this system in a car for roughly $1,100 over its original sticker price.

Though the powertrain is more efficient, it hasn’t given up any performance over the larger 2.0-liter. The setup makes 143 horsepower at 5,500 and still runs the same 9.2-seconds to 60 mph.

We wouldn’t be surprised to find this technology making its way into products in the next few years. As Jay points out in the video, nothing on the car is break-through technology. All the components were pre-existing, so it’s proven technology and should be easy to manufacture.


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