jay leno garage

jay leno garage

It’s no secret that carbon fiber is one of the latest breakthrough materials that provides a high-strength, low-weight solution to nearly any problem. Today it is used in making body panels, support bracing, and even entire monocoque chassis. But now, companies are developing complete one-piece carbon-fiber wheels. Jay Leno takes a look at Carbon Revolution, a company that is on the brink of releasing its carbon-fiber wheels to the marketplace, including to an undisclosed OEM automaker. Yep, soon we’ll see a mainstream automaker release a vehicle rolling on a set of carbon-fiber wheels.

Brett Gass, Executive Director for Carbon Revolution stopped by Jay’s garage to show off the new wheels. Weighing in at roughly 15 pounds, the carbon-fiber wheels weigh an average of five pounds less than a set of lightweight aluminum wheels normally found of today’s sports cars. Gass also elaborates on how his wheel is certified by the German government to pass all safety and strength requirements.

To test the wheels, Jay, Gass, and a group of friends head out to Willow Springs Raceway in a 2008 Porsche 911 GT3 RS . Besides a sideways slip into the dirt by Jay, the carbon fiber-shod Porsche holds the road. The group of guys talk about how standard, lightweight aluminum wheels flex, while the carbon-fiber rims don’t. The premise seems a little far-fetched to me that a novice driver in a borrowed car can feel the aluminum wheels flex, though I don’t doubt the benefits of lighter wheels. Either way, it’s an interesting look at the future of wheel design and construction.

Jay’s latest adventure takes a deep dive into hot-rodding history with this beautiful 1932 Ford Highboy roadster . But don’t pass this off as just another deuce coupe . No, this car is the deuce coupe. Jay has with him Bruce Meyer, the car’s restorer and current owner, who tells of a storied past barely imaginable.

The story began in the late 1940s as U.S. soldiers were returning home from the war. At that time, Bob McGee was a student at the University of Southern California and had customized the 1932 Ford in ways never done before. He had notched the frame in order to lower the car, added a custom three-piece hood, V-notched the spreader bar, removed the fenders, shaved the radiator cap and door handles, reworked the car’s interior, and added a 21-stud, Flathead V-8 from a 1934 Ford.

The car then gains even more notoriety when Bob Petersen, the owner of Hot Rod Magazine and Petersen Publishing, shot a picture of McGee in his deuce coupe cruising along the USC campus for the cover of Hot Rod Magazine. As it turns out, McGee’s roadster was one of the first hot rods to grace the magazine’s cover.

McGee eventually had to sell his beloved roadster and the car underwent many other modifications over the years by the hands of several owners. That’s when Bruce Meyer got a hold of it. He painstakingly restored the car back to its original glory, even employing the direction of McGee in his older age.

Now we get to enjoy this piece of history as Jay and Bruce drive the 1932 Ford down its native streets of Southern California. This, my friends, is the definition of hot-rodding.

The world has definitely taken notice of Dodge’s new Challenger SRT Hellcat . Journalist from all over the world rave about its 707 horsepower and its ability to run the quarter-mile in 10.8 seconds on drag radials, while still getting nearly 20 mpg while cruising down the highway. Well, the time has come for famed car guy Jay Leno to get behind the Hellcat’s wheel.

Helping Jay give the Challenger a once-over is the President and CEO of Dodge, Tim Kuniskis. The two guys quickly start talking about the how the new Challenger Hellcat compares with Jay’s original 1970 Challenger that’s powered by the legendary 426 HEMI — a car that when new, represented the same outrageous performance as the Challenger Hellcat of today.

“The 1970 Challenger,” Jay says, “This was like the scariest car in the world when I was a kid. 425 horsepower, 0 to 60 mph in 6.4 seconds. Now not so much.” Jay continues saying, “It’s like walking around with a rolled up sock in your pants…it’s not that impressive. But this, (pointing to the 2015 Challenger Hellcat), this is impressive."

As he walks toward the 2015 Challenger Hellcat, it’s stunning to see the size difference between the two cars. There’s no wondering why Dodge had to stuff 707 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque under its hood. As Tim walks Jay through the workings of the Hellcat, he spouts off some impressive facts. At around the 17-minute mark, Tim walks Jay through the SRT Performance Pages on the Challenger’s 8.4-inch Uconnect infotainment screen.

Of course, no muscle-bound Jay Leno’s Garage is complete without a smoky burnout at the end. Sure enough the Hellcat’s supercharged, 6.2-liter, HEMI V-8 provides plenty of billowing clouds for theatrics.

Jay is riding low in this episode of Jay Leno’s Garage . Our legendary petrol-head host meets up with three low rider aficionados who take Jay through the ins and outs of low rider tech and history. The two beautiful low rider examples are a black, 1966 Chevrolet Impala and a pinstriped 1963 Chevy Impala Convertible. Both are completely customized with unique parts and outstanding chrome work.

Jay starts off talking with the editor of Lowrider Magazine, Joe Ray, about how the low-rider culture got its start back in the 1960s and how it’s spreading all over the world today.

After that, Jay talks with Chris Najera, the owner of the black 1966 Impala about why he kept a solid paint color and how he modernized a few key bits of the interior. Under the hood lies an absolutely beautiful V-8 drenched in chrome and brimming with power.

Brandon Brusca then shows Jay nearly every inch of his candy-colored orange 1963 Impala Convertible. Every single inch of the car is completely customized. The pinstriped paint job runs the entire length of the car and exemplified automotive artistic craftsmanship. A 409-cubic-inch V-8 burbles between pinstriped inner fender wells and is covered in chrome.

Jay continues to take a look at the ’63 Impala, but from the underside, where the craftsmanship and attention to detail matches that of the top side. There are even engravings on the chrome-plated link bars for the rear suspension. Every nut, every bolt, and every connector is shined to meticulous perfection.

The kicker to it all is the ’63 Impala’s air-suspension system. It utilizes air compressors originally built in the 1960s for U.S. fighter planes. The video might be long, but it’s worth your time, even if you’re not into the low-rider scene.

Yet another episode of Jay Leno’s Garage has hit the comedian’s YouTube channel and this one is all about the details. Jay and his Corvette -expert friend Mike McCluskey take a deep dive into the rare 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray that Mike painstakingly restored to factory specifications. Everything from the radiator hoses to the flat-top bolt holding the master cylinder’s lid on tight are talked about.

As it turns out, the 21,000 1963 Sting Rays made were nearly hand-built and each car can almost be considered a concept car . The 1963’s parts differed so greatly from the previous generation that the designers and engineers essentially designed it as they went. Then in 1964, the car’s assembly process was smoothed out, making them easier to build. The ‘63’s hubcaps, for example, are comprised of 17 separate pieces rather than the single stamping piece used from ’64 on.

Besides the 1963’s rarity, especially for its one-year-only split-window design, the car also helped mark the beginning of fuel injection in American cars. Until that time, only a select few European cars came equipped with such a fuel delivery device. Jay’s particular Sting Ray is powered by a 327-cubic-inch small-block making 360 horsepower. That’s an output rating well beyond what other performance cars of the era were making.

Though it’s 22 minutes long, the video holds your attention with facts and interesting tid-bits that only make the C2 Sting Ray that much more special to today’s car culture.

If you’ve never missed an episode of Jay Leno’s Garage , the latest one is an awfully bad place to start. In this episode, Leno talks about the Mille Miglia , the legendary Italian open-road endurance race ran 24 times from 1927 to 1957 before changing its format in 1977 as a regular race for classic and vintage cars . Being a student of automotive racing history, Leno knows everything there is to know about the Mille Miglia. In this episode, he puts all that to use as we’re taken on a comprehensive look behind the history and extravagance of this legendary 1,000-mile race.

In between interviews with the likes of Stirling Moss and Martin Brundle, Leno also spent some time at the 2014 Mille Miglia with Jaguar Design Director Ian Callum.

The Mille Miglia isn’t what it used to be, having been changed to a more relaxed event that’s more about showcasing the classic cars of old than it is trying to beat them. Still, Leno managed to capture magic of Mille Miglia the way nobody else can, and that translated to arguably one of the best episodes of Jay Leno’s Garage.

Be sure to have some time for this episode because it gives you a first-class education at one of the most dangerous racing events in the history of the sport.

Although enthusiasts regard the E-Type as the most iconic and beautiful Jaguars ever built, I think there’s at least one other Jag that can match its distinction. I’m talking about the XKSS, a limited-edition, two-seat roadster based on the D-Type race car.

My reasoning is pretty much simple here. The XKSS has the gorgeous looks of the 1950s Jaguars, the racing heritage of the Le Mans-winning D-Type , and a track-prepped structure coming straight from the company’s motorsport division. Add the fact that Jag built only 16 of these sports cars , and you’ll understand why the XKSS is a coveted and expensive collectible.

The XKSS also benefits from an association with famed American actor Steve McQueen , who owned a British Racing Green-pained example and drove it around Los Angeles for years. Now resting its wheels in the Peterson Automotive Museum, McQueen’s Jag just took a trip to Jay Leno’s garage , the place where the world’s greatest vehicles are taken to be reviewed and showcased.

But unlike other cars that have passed through his garage, the XKSS seems to have mesmerized Leno, as the TV host can’t stop praising the roadster enough throughout the 20-minute episode. Just hit the play button and you’ll find out what we mean.

The perks of being Jay Leno seemingly has no bounds these days. Whereas most of us would call it a lucky day just to own a car that has four wheels and takes us from point A to point B, Leno’s definition of a lucky day is finally receiving the McLaren P1 .

Oh, to be that guy.

In the latest episode of Jay Leno’s Garage, Leno finally gets his hands on his personal P1 and proceeds to make the rest of the auto world green with envy with his proclamation that he had already put "1,000 miles" on it. Care to give us a ride in that mighty machine, Jay?

But the real meat of the episode focused on his guest, Mike Flewitt, CEO of McLaren Automotive. Together, the two talked shop about McLaren Automotive’s history and the success the company has had since it first introduced the F1 a little over 20 years ago. From there, the discussion eventually moved to the P1, the company’s latest supercar that has pretty much exceeded all the expectations everyone has set on it since the time development began. He also tried to trick Flewitt into revealing the rumored 7-minute Nurburgring time of the P1.

Or as Leno puts it, the P1 has made even the most hardened of auto journalists "gush over it like school children." To that, we can’t argue with him.

Check out the rest of the episode as Jay takes his new P1 out for a drive on the streets of Los Angeles. Chances are, you’d be dying to ride shotgun by the time the episode’s over.

Although the first automobile built on an assembly line – the Ford Model T – is about 106 years old, the history of the self-propelled vehicle goes all the way back to 1769, when a French inventor created a steam-powered tricycle.

Revised over the next hundred year, this external combustion engine concept was eventually used by a number of U.S.-based automakers until the more efficient gasoline powered was perfected. Most steam car manufacturers are rather anonymous today, but there’s one particular name that stands out – Doble.

Founded in Detroit by Abner Doble, the said company built steam cars between 1909 through 1931, with their latter models, which used electric starters and fast firing boilers, being considered the pinnacle of steam car development.

The Doble E-20, for instance, was able to reach top speeds of up to 132 mph in 1925, matching the performance figures offered by very few internal combustion cars of that era, one of them being Duesenberg . Dobles are a very rare sight nowadays, but one very lucky E-20 model found a home in Jay Leno’s garage , where all sorts of vehicles ranging from vintage steam cars to the latest supercars are known to rest their wheels.

This episode is an awesome history lesson on Doble vehicles, as Leno not only takes the E-20 for a drive, but also explains the mechanics underneath its body. You obviously won’t get any V-8 action in this one, but it’s a piece worth watching if you’re into the more obscure side of the automotive industry.

Some of us consider buying a new pair of Jordans as money well spent. But for a guy like Jay Leno , Jordans just don’t cut it anymore. If you want to get this guy all giddy, he needs to buy something he really wants, which in this case happens to be a McLaren P1 .

Recently, Leno was captured taking the P1 out to stretch its legs and by looking at how excited he was just by getting out of it, you can tell that Leno already has a soft spot for this incredible piece of British engineering. If it weren’t so big, we would have thought he’s been hugging it in bed every night since he received it.

The McLaren P1 is a legitimate bad-ass, one that’s capable of producing a staggering 903 horsepower and 1,100 pound-feet of torque. That allows the P1 to cover 0-to-60 mph in just 2.7 seconds, faster than some of us can move our foot from the brake to the gas pedal when a traffic light turns green. Top speed is at 217 mph, which pretty much means it’s ridiculously fast.


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