Koenigsegg

Koenigsegg cars

On paper, this may seem like a very silly race. A “low-level” supercar in the McLaren 650S , a hybrid Porsche 918 and an ultra-exotic Koenigsegg Agera R with a top speed of more than 250 mph all lined up for a drag race. Who will win? Obviously since we are interested in this at all, the results will be surprising.

For once I am going to go ahead and spoil things for you by saying that the 918 wins. It may not have a top speed anywhere near the Agera R’s, but thanks to that instant electric torque and AWD, it launches from the line like a rocket. The real interesting story is the McLaren 650S. Considering it is the cheapest and slowest McLaren you can currently buy, it has no place in this fight, but it holds its own surprisingly well.

It just goes to show that even the slowest of the supercars are blindingly quick, especially over short distances in a straight line. Press that little play button to get an eyeful of horsepower, as there are about 2500 raging ponies between these three pieces of metal and carbon fiber. There is also a good bit of roaring exhaust noise, but sadly the quality isn’t the best, so don’t worry about cranking the volume too high on this one.

Why do you think the McLaren did so well in this race? Is the Agera being driven by a rookie? Does the 650S have more power than McLaren says? I want to read your opinions in the comments. As always, I’ll come back later and comment on what you guys said.

Supercar companies spend a lot of time testing their vehicles, and with so much time and effort being put into testing, accidents are bound to happen. Some involve minor mishaps that are taken care of immediately, while other take a little more time to fix. However, there are accidents that nobody wants to happen and usually these are the types that end with somebody getting hurt.

Unfortunately, that’s what happened to Koenigsegg during a recent test run at the Nurburgring. The Swedish supercar manufacturer spent a few days on the ‘Ring with the One:1 and an Agera R -based prototype. Our spy photographers reported that the testing was going smoothly until the Agera R prototype got involved in a major accident, violently crashing into the barriers at the track.

Photos of the crash’s aftermath show the mule suffering some damage to the front and rear sections but more importantly, both the driver and the passenger were also hurt with the former sadly receiving the brunt of the crash. The speed photos we got were apparently taken a little over a minute before the unfortunate accident.

Hopefully, the driver and the passenger of the Agera R recover from their injuries sooner than later. Nobody wants to see something like this happen, especially on what is supposed to a controlled test session.

Click past the jump to read more about the crash

How many times can one really wax poetic about the Koenigsegg One:1 ? The short answer, of course, is not enough. That’s not to say that we’re never going to grow tired of it because everything, no matter how awesome, has a shelf life. But who are we kidding, really? We can’t have enough of the One:1 and thankfully, there are people like Shmee whose sole purpose in this world is to make us jealous.

The famous YouTube car guy has uploaded this spectacular video of the One:1. It’s called the “Exclusive First Look” at the mighty Koenigsegg and who are we to really argue with him.

Shmee’s video caught the One:1 in ways no other video has ever done. He even gets to ride shotgun, as the One:1 is put through the paces in the real happiest place on Earth: the Koenigsegg headquarters in Sweden.

Sorry, Disneyland.

Shmee’s level of access is unparalleled, and he proved it once again, thanks to this up-close look at one of the most powerful cars in the world today.

When a car that costs $2.4 million does some fancy burnouts, it’s probably a great idea to just stay the hell away. The Koenigsegg One:1 definitely qualifies as one of those supercars that need their space more than any other exotic in the world. So understand the need to give it a little breathing room, especially when its showing off its all 1,340 horses and 1,011 pound-feet of torque with some tire-smoldering donuts.

More than that, it actually looks impressive doing it, even at the potential cost of messing up that carbon-fiber beauty. The combination of that throaty engine roar with a touch of turbo whistle and the ear-piercing sound of burning rubber also creates a nice collaborative treat for the ears, the kind that very few cars in this world are capable of.

So the next time you see a Koenigsegg One:1 — if you’re lucky enough to see one in the first place — don’t get too close. Instead, just step back and enjoy it while you can.

The next installment of Koenigsegg’s "Inside Koenigsegg" web series has been released and this time, the point of discussion centers on the car’s 3D-printed, variable-turbo technology. Jumping from the last episode, we know see Christian Von Koenigsegg at the Geneva Motor Show talking about a variable turbo technology, an idea his company began thinking off a few years ago to give reasonably sized engines more power versatility. Basically, Koenigsegg talked about the importance of the turbo turbine housing, which helps the engine run smoother and more efficiently. To achieve that, Koenigsegg developed two housings in one, featuring an inner house that’s close to the turbine and a bigger turbo housing that serves the purpose of improving the engine’s breathing at a higher RPM.

Not surprisingly it’s technology that Koenigsegg developed on its own and used on the One:1 megacar . At this point, it’s hard to imagine how many more tricks and new tech Koenigsegg plans to highlight from its one-of-a-kind exotic .

At the rate its going with these Inside Koenigsegg episodes, there’s a good chance that we’re going to see more of the One:1’s incredible anatomy.

Here’s a suggestion, though. If Koenigsegg really wanted to make an impact with this web series, it should really try to pace the release of these episodes. Nobody’s trying to beat you, guys, so you can take your time with releasing new episodes to build up the suspense a little bit.

Koenigsegg isn’t just content with being an exclusive brand for the rich and super rich; it also wants to cater to people who can’t afford their supercars . So the company is thinking of adding an entry-level model in its mix, although by its definition of "entry-level", it’s talking about a car that costs just $600,000. The company’s dictionary sure is a lot different from the rest of us.

Speaking to Motoring Australia at the New York Auto Show , Christian Von Koenigsegg expressed his plan to add a little diversity to the Koenigsegg lineup. Instead of just offering hypercars that come with seven-digit price tags, Von Koenigsegg is looking to add a new model that will only cost six digits, or to be more specific only twice as expensive as a Lamborghini Aventador .

We can make light of Koenigsegg’s relative idea of "entry-level", but we can’t deny that such a car sounds no less interesting than its current models. He indicated that this model will still retain a high degree of exclusivity that should bode well for those wanting a Koenigsegg but can’t afford the $1.3 million price tag of the Agera . There are people with that kind of money, especially in the Chinese and U.S. markets replete with car-loving individuals that have the deep pockets to match their thirst for speed and exclusivity.

Koenigsegg didn’t divulge a whole lot of details about this "entry-level" supercar, but you have to wonder what the timetable is for this car’s arrival.

Here’s to hoping it’s sooner rather than later.

Click past the jump to read more about the current Koenigsegg Agera R.

Source: Motoring

The fourth episode of Inside Koenigsegg’s web series on the Koenigsegg One:1 megacar has just been released, and this time around, Christian Von Koenigsegg talked about the advantages of a technology the company used to develop the insane exotic: 3D print.

In case you didn’t know, 3D printing is a process by which a three-dimensional object is made from a digital model. The objects are created and achieved through additive process, a step where successive layers of material are laid down in different shapes by way of laser scanning. That’s the basic gist of it, but Koenigsegg dives even deeper into how the technology is being used on the One:1.

In this instance, Koenigsegg explained how 3D printing was used to give Koenigsegg the freedom to design components that could be used exclusively on the supercar . The company boss also talked about the advantages of metal 3D printing and how the company’s low volume manufacturing of its car justifies the cost of printing 3D metal parts to create materials that are unique from their competitors.

It’s arguably the most fascinating of the four episodes that have been released so far. We’ve heard a lot about 3D printing in the past couple of years, but the way Koenigsegg used the technology on the One:1 just speaks to the kind of out-of-the-box thinking the company prides itself in.

Koenigsegg has been releasing episodes of its "Inside Koenigsegg" web series web series at a feverish pace; it’s been hard just to keep up with it. But we’re not complaining, because the subject of the series — the One:1 megacar — is fascinating enough to keep all of us on our toes, waiting for the next episode to drop. Just yesterday, the fifth and latest episode was released, and true to the theme of the series, this episode takes an up-close look at the megacar ’s carbon-fiber wheels.

Yes, the One:1 has wheels made out of carbon fiber, just like most of the parts you see on the car. But Koenigsegg doesn’t use just any kind of carbon fiber; it actually uses what’s called "pre-preg" carbon fiber, the same material used in Formula One, fighter jets and space ships.

Koenigsegg founder Christian Von Koenigsegg described the rationale behind his company’s decision to use carbon-fiber wheels, and apart from the obvious weight savings it provides for the One:1, these carbon-fiber wheels are also strong enough to withstand the unbridled power and handling dynamics of the One:1.

Koenigsegg is the first automaker to produce carbon-fiber wheels, something you can expect for an automaker that has prided itself on being one of the best innovators in the industry. The technolog y is far from cheap, and the laborious development takes a lot of time to produce. But that’s a luxury Koenigsegg has as a premium car maker that develops only a select number of supercars a year.

Check out the video and watch how Koenigsegg builds these carbon fiber wheels from scratch all the way to the final product.. It’s another incredible episode that shouldn’t be missed.

Koenigsegg has been churning out episodes of its Inside Koenigsegg web series at around the same pace as the speed of its subject, the One:1 megacar . Now on its third episode, Inside Koenigsegg now takes us on an in-depth look at the One:1 ’s active rear wing.

Christian Von Koenigsegg claims that the One:1’s rear wing is the world’s first top-mounted active rear wing, a distinction the company decided to go with because it creates the kind of downforce that can be of good use to the high-speed stability of the One:1.

Another unique characteristic of this top-mounted active rear wing is its weight. According to Koenigsegg, the whole carbon-fiber component only weighs 10 kg, one-third the weight of similar contraptions from Koenigsegg’s competitors.

That’s pretty impressive, more so knowing how much it helps the supercar achieve its ungodly performance capabilities. It makes us wonder, really, how far more advanced the One:1 really is when you line it up against its rivals.

The second and latest episode of Drive’s "Inside Koenigsegg" web series is now up online. In keeping up with the overall theme of the second season, this episode returns to showcase the 5.0-liter, V-8 engine of the powerful supercar it has ever built: the Koenigsegg One:1 .

Much has been said about the One:1 and all of them has been either tinted with breathless amazement or shameless gushing. We admit to having fallen to both states at one point or another. But for all the technological wonder of the One:1, the heart of the car remains its massive V-8 engine that spits out an ungodly 1,340 horsepower and 1,011 pound-feet of torque.

Koenigsegg founder Christian Von Koenigsegg returns to give us a rundown on the development of the One:1’s engine, including his disclosure that the One:1’s engine is actually an evolution of the one sitting inside the Agera R .

In order to generate that much more horsepower, Koenigsegg went and changed a number of the engine’s mechanical components, including the camshafts, the springs, the valves, the injectors, the fuel pumps, and the turbochargers. And that’s just the physical changes, as Koenigsegg put it. Software modifications were also done to raise the redline of the engine.

As always, it’s a fascinating look inside one of the most highly regarded supercar manufacturers in the world and how it goes about the business of continuing to raise the bar of exotic engineering.


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