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1994 Lamborghini Sogna by Art & Tech

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If the name "Lamborghini Sogna" does not ring a bell, don’t feel bad. Since it was not actually produced by Lamborghini , it is not a well-known model. This model happens to be the handy work of the Japanese company Art & Tech.

The Songa is based on a Lamborghini Countach and started as a dream car for the 13-year-old Ryoji Yamazaki’ego. The fact that is was his dream car plays right into the name, as "Sogna" is the Italian word for "Dream."

By today’s standards, this car is anything, but a dream car, giving its very strange exterior look. Still, considering the model was inspired by the cars from the 1980s, you have to give it at least a little credit. The Sogna features a body made in aluminum and came equipped with scissor doors.

Sogna was unveiled at the 1991 Geneva Motor Show when Art & Tech announced plans to put into limited production with a price tag of $1.6 million per unit - which is pretty huge for that period (about $4 million at the current dollar value).

Art & Tech dropped its plans for a production model, as it only found the means to an engine for just the one show car. This engine was a mid-mounted, 5.2-liter with an output of 455 horsepower. The second unit was left with no engine and is currently on display at a museum in France , leaving the Sogna as a one-off model.

Art & Tech claimed a top speed of 201 mph, but later testing showed the Sogna could only hit 186 mph.

If you so happen to be interested in this monster, you are in luck, as it can now be yours for a cool €2,380,000 — about $3,3 million at the current exchange rates.

Click past the jump to see the Lamborghini Sogna in action and to read more about it.

Source: Jamesedition

Lamborghini Sogna - In Detail

Lamborghini Sogna by Art & Tech

Yeah, she was an ugly rig, but you can sense a little bit of the Countach under all of that ugliness.

Lamborghini Sogna by Art & Tech

The backside actually was relatively pleasant to look at. In fact, it almost looks like something you may see on supercars of today.

Lamborghini Sogna by Art & Tech

The wheels were unmistakably Countach.




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