Lexus LF-A

Lexus LF-A

Posted on by Simona  

Today at the Tokyo Auto Salon, Lexus unveiled a very cool LF-A Code X specially designed by Gazoo Racing for the upcoming 24-Hour Nurburgring race set to take place on January 19th, 2014. Along with the Code X, Gazoo Racing will also enter the race with a specially designed Toyota GT86 .

What’s so special about this LF-A Code X is that, according to Gazoo Racing, is "an experimental vehicle to polish the sports car technology of the future." The most striking feature offered on the new Code X is its more powerful engine.

Gazoo Racing replaced the standard 552-horsepower, 4.8-liter, V-10 engine with a new 5.3-liter engine that pumps out more power. Unfortunately, we have no details on how much power this new engine will deliver, but Gazoo said that the output has been better tuned to deliver quicker lap times around the Nurburgring.

Updated 03/28/2014: Gazoo Racing unveiled a new video showing the LF-A Code X in action on the race track. Enjoy!

Click past the jump to read more about the Lexus LFA Code X By Gazoo Racing.

Posted on by Simona  

Lexus stopped building the LF-A in December 2012 and now, one year later, the folks at Motor Trend decided to remind us just how outstanding the LF-A was.

Motor Trend did so by featuring this discontinued supercar in the latest episode of World’s Fastest Car Show. Justin Bell took the LF-A out of the Toyota Museum and oushed it as hard as he could..

For those that don’t remember, the LF-A is powered by a 4.8-liter V-10 that delivers a total of 560 horsepower that sprints the car from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.7 seconds and up to a top speed of 202 mph. It was built in standard version that Lexus priced at $375,000 and in a Nürburgring package priced from $445,000.

Check out the above video to see if the LF-A still amazes as much as it did when Lexus first launched the incredible model.

Posted on by Tushar  
Lexus RC

Autocar recently had the opportunity to chat with a lead engineer from Lexus and according to the ex-development lead of the Lexus LF-A project, there are a few new high-performance models lined up for the future. The interaction with Haruhiko Tanahashi also raised rumors about a V-8 powered RC F coupe that could be headed for the 2014 Detroit Auto Show .

So, although an LF-A replacement won’t happen in the near future, a couple of F models may provide some excitement. That is until a more reasonably priced LF-A enters the fray.

The new ’F products’ would form the Japanese car maker’s premium high-performance range, starting with the RC F, GS-F and IS F . Lexus is gearing-up to introduce the second-generation IS F sedan for a later date, while the RC Coupe could get a V-8 engine transplant soon.

On top of all of these in-the-works goodies, Lexus officials also hint of performance hybrids being a part of the F-product lineup. That is sure to get anybody amped up — gratuitous electricity pun very much intended.

Click past the jump to read more about the Lexus’ F lineup

Source: Autocar
Posted on by Simona  

While we await seeing the unveiling of the new LF-Lc, the LF-A continues catching our attention whenever the opportunity arises. Like this time when it was filmed testing on a racetrack in Dubai .

The video starts with a few shots of the car, giving us the opportunity to remember what a great design it was and continues to be. Then the video cuts to shots of the LF-A lapping the racetrack. If you ever wondered how LF-A’s V-10 engine sounds at 124 mph (200 km/h), this is your change to find out. We have a little advice for you though: turn up your volume really high so you can really enjoy that incredible music.

As a reminder, the LF-A is powered by a 4.8-liter V-10 that delivers a total of 560 horsepower. This helps sprint the car from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.7 seconds and up to a top speed of 202 mph.

Posted on by Simona  

The Lexus LF-A supercar went out of production in December 2012; but even so, Lexus is still very proud of the model it developed. So proud that today it released a sweet tribute video that reminds us what a great car the LF-A is.

The idea of creating one of the world’s greatest supercars started back in 2000 when Lexus engineer, Haruhiko Tanahashi, assembled a team of engineers and launched this challenging project. After being almost canceled on several occasions, the LF-A was finally put into production in 2010.

It was limited to only 500 units, each carrying a price tag of $375,000. The LF-A is powered by a 4.8-liter V-10 that delivers a total of 560 horsepower. This helped sprint the car from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.7 seconds and up to a top speed of 202 mph.

According to Lexus, the materials, knowledge and techniques used in the LF-A’s creation will be used for other future models.

With Fast and Furious 6 currently running away with box office records, Lexus saw an opportune time to get the LF-A supercar some publicity.

Not that it needed any, but when you can show just how durable the Japanese supercar is despite logging 30,000 miles on the odometer, you do it with the pomp it deserves. Having Paul Walker drive it definitely takes it over the top.

The video, which was shot at Willow Springs International Raceway in California, was shot to celebrate the fact that a pair of LFAs have reached the all-important milestone of 30,000 miles. All while still purring like kittens, albeit with a slightly more roar to them.

As a man who knows his cars, Walker was the perfect celebrity to invite for this momentous occasion and as the star of Fast and Furious 6 said so himself, the event was nothing short of a blast.

Click past the jump to read about the Lexus LF-A

On December 14th, 2012 , Lexus built its last LF-A supercar - a white Nürburgring Package Edition - specially developed for a museum. The last unit destined for the road – No. 499 - finally found its home. The model arrived in the U.S. as a birthday gift to Roy Mallady, who is already on his second LF-A – his first was No. 003. In fact, Mallady is a real Lexus enthusiast, as he previously owned nine other models: nine LSs, four LX SUVs and an SC400.

If you think that he is one of those drivers that buys a supercar just to keep it in its garage, you’ll be happy to know that his first LF-A already has 7,000 miles on its ticker and is already on its third set of brakes. So, why did he need a second LF-A? It’s likely because he finds it a "better track car than any Ferrari" and he just liked being watched while driving his supercar on the highway.

Who are we to disagree the man?

Source: Autoweek

Production of the Lexus LF-A stopped on December 14th, 2012 , but this doesn’t mean you have to stop enjoying the news about it. For example, National Geographic’s hit show, Mega Mega factories, recently featured the Lexus supercar. You will learn how the car was built, starting with the design board and up to the safety tests.

For those of you who still need a reminder, the LF-A is powered by a 4.8-liter V-10 engine that delivers a total of 560 horsepower and sprints the car from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.7 seconds and up to a top speed of 202 mph.

During this 45-minute-long video you will learn everything you never knew about this impressive Japanese supercar. All we can hope is that Lexus will come with a new version of it. But until then, we will continue to wait until we see the production version of the LF-Cc .

Lexus LF-CC Concept

Now that production of the Lexus LF-A has come to an end, the Japanese automaker is left without a sports car in its lineup. While it’s a hard to replace a “halo car” like the LF-A, Autocar is reporting that the LF-CC Concept , the same one that made its debut at the Paris Auto Show last September, could take the reins from the LF-A as the company’s next sports car.

According to the report, steps are already underway to begin development of a production LF-CC. This stems from a Lexus source saying that the objective this time around isn’t to showcase a limited-edition supercar the way they did with the LF-A, but to build a car that was “exciting and emotional,” and one that reflects Lexus’ intended future image as a “sporting” brand.

The new sports car will wear both coupe and convertible guise, and will carry styling cues from the concept LF-CC. A rear-drive platform is also likely to be used, similar to the setups Lexus used on the new IS and GS models. But most importantly, the production LF-CC is poised to carry a hybrid powertrain.

We have no illusions that the production LF-CC will eventually supplant the LF-A as Lexus’ fabled supercar, but we do understand the latter’s impact in giving Lexus some sports car chops, something it hasn’t had in a long time.

Here’s to hoping that the production LF-CC can carry that tradition when it makes its reported debut by 2015.

Source: Autocar UK

Toyota has invested lots of money in the carbon-fiber structure used for the Lexus LF- A, so, despite the car’s huge price tag of $375,000 and the total of 500 units produced, it still was impossible for it to recover its entire investment. So, now the company is consideration the possibility of using this structure for more affordable cars but there is no possibility to see a successor for theLF-A .

Lexus never expect the LF-A to turn into a profitable car and was built only to show off, but the current soaring Japanese yen has killed any possibility to see a roadster version of the famous supercar.

In the upcoming models, carbon fiber will be used for hoods, roofs, trunk lids and aerodynamic parts. This doesn’t mean, however, that we should expect such models on the market in the near future. The company did confirm that carbon fiber will be used for both Toyota and Lexus models, but for now this process is still too expensive.

So, when will we see carbon fiber used in those affordable cars? The answer is quite simple: when the cost for carbon fiber goes down.


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