McLaren 650S

McLaren 650S

British sports car manufacturer McLaren is considering a comeback to the iconic 24 Hours of Le Mans race for the first time since 1998. The news comes via McLaren GT boss Andrew Kirkaldy, who says the company could return to the Circuit de la Sarthe as soon as 2016. McLaren’s vehicle of choice for the race will be the 650S , Kirkaldy revealed, meaning the Brits won’t tackle the top LMP1 tier, but the GTE category instead.

"I would be very surprised if you don’t see a 650S running at Le Mans at some point and we hope to be there from 2016," he told Autosport, adding that McLaren is still waiting for The Automobile Club de l’Ouest and the FIA to finalize the GTE class rulebook for 2016. "That’s what we want to do, but we still need a set of regulations to build the car to," he concluded.

McLaren hasn’t revealed any other details, but the Le Mans-ready 650S will be based on the recently unveiled 650S GT3, which will replace the 12C GT3 in the Blancplain Endurance Series starting 2015. We expect the Le Mans-spec sports car to carry the 650S GTE moniker and share many internals, including the 3.8-liter, V-8 engine, with the 650S GT3.

Click past the jump to read more about McLaren’s return to LeMans.

Source: Autosport

The brand-new McLaren 650S was introduced at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show as a replacement for the MP4-12C. The sports car debuted in Coupe and Roadster body styles with 640 horsepower and 500 pound-feet of torque on tap. Powered by the same twin-turbo, 3.8-liter V-8 seen across the entire McLaren lineup, the 650S comes to the market as a competitor for the Ferrari 458 and the Lamborghini Huracan. Coming into 2015, the British sports car is also getting a track suit with a 650S GT3 label on it.

Developed as a successor to the highly acclaimed 12C GT3 , the 650S will replace its forerunner in the Blancplain Endurance Series starting next year. Additionally, the new race car will get to showcase its skills in various GT races around the world hoping to match the success of its predecessor. Although it is essentially an updated 12C GT3, the 650S GT3 carries an array of newly-developed racing parts, which are supposed to make it faster and more agile on the track. Only time will tell if the 650S is worthy of the GT3 moniker, but, until then, let’s have a look at the technology behind it.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 McLaren 650S GT3.

For the second consecutive year, McLaren Automotive has been awarded engine of the year, as it joins Ferrari as one of the winners of a 2014 Engine of the Year award. Ferrari won its awards in the "Above 4-Liter" class and as the "Performance Engine of the Year," while McLaren’s masterful 3.8-liter, twin-turbo, V-8 engine took home the award in the "3-Liter to 4-Liter" category, proving yet again that when it comes to engine innovation, the British supercar builder takes a back seat to no one.

The engine, technically named the "M838T," was designed and developed in collaboration with engine builder Ricardo. A big part of the M838T’s appeal is the way McLaren was able to modify its capabilities to produce a class-leading output of 640 horsepower and 500 pound-feet of torque. More importantly, the engine not only produces supercar-level output numbers, but it’s also a highly efficient engine, capable of returning 24.2 mpg on the EU combined cycle.

McLaren uses the M838T engine in the coupe and spider versions of the McLaren 650S , the company’s newest supercar. If you didn’t know by now, the 650S is a whole lot of awesome. A big reason for its awesomeness is this 3.8-liter, V-8 engine that is described as a "wonderful piece of powertrain engineering."

Winning engine of the year in the "3-Liter to 4-Liter" category at the 2014 Engine of the Year awards is living proof of that.

Click past the jump to read more about the McLaren M838T.

After much speculation and teasing, McLaren released the all-new, P1 -inspired 650S in 2014. This model takes the place of the aging MP4, and delivers a mammoth 640 horsepower. Just a few months after its official debut, McLaren released a concept version of the 650S from its bespoke arm, McLaren Special Operations. This pitch-black concept obviously caught the attention of movers and shakers, as McLaren announced right before the 2014 Goodwood Festival of Speed that the MSO 650S would indeed be a limited-production vehicle.

This MSO 650S draws most of its styling cues from the concept that debuted in early 2014. Its carbon-fiber side wings and rear bumper center section, and rear diffuser are all taken directly from the concept. Even the sinister black color that the concept wore when it debuted is part of the production model. In fact, the only straying this concept-turned-production does on its way to driveways is the addition of new interior bits and some featherweight wheels.

Click past the jump to read about this awesome, limited-edition supercar.

/Drive made history of sorts as the first automotive channel on YouTube to be given a slot in primetime television. It’s now a part of NBC Sports , which means that it has reached a level of cache not a lot of YouTube-born shows can boast of.

So here they are, /Drive’s Chris Harris, Mike Spinelli, and Matt Farah, all enjoying the spoils of having their own TV show in America. It’s not quite like Top Gear yet, but it is pretty cool seeing the boys from Drive in a platform that doesn’t require Internet connection.

The debut episode of "/Drive on NBC Sports" was pretty cool. It coincided with the Monaco Grand Prix so naturally, it had a certain Monaco theme to it.

Harris, Farah, and Spinelli embarked on the kind of epic joyride people only get to experience when they’re given supercars to drive. In this case, Harris received the Ferrari F12Berlinetta , while Farah got the Mercedes SLS AMG Black Series . For his part, Spinelli was given a McLaren 650S , which is just about as awesome as the F12Berlinetta and the SLS AMG Black Series.

The objective was pretty straightforward. All three had to embark from the home factories of the supercars they were driving and travel 1,500 miles to Monaco. The debut episode had a hint of Top Gear-like elements to it, but it was also nice to see that the people behind the production of /Drive decided to give its own identity. We’re not going to spoil what happens in the episode because there’s 22 minutes worth of show to digest. Spare some free time for this because it’s a change of pace from the typical automotive TV show.

NBC Sports just got more exciting as the network announces it’s adding the automotive YouTube sensation Drive to its Saturday morning lineup. That’s right, our friends Matt Farah, Chris Harris, and Mike Spinelli are taking their Internet show to the big time.

Drive on NBC Sports is scheduled for a 10-episide run with the pilot episode airing May 24th at 9:30 a.m. Eastern. The first show will be all about the 2014 Monaco Grand Prix F1 race and features the gang driving a McLaren 650S , a Ferrari F12 , and a Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG through the streets of Monaco.

Episodes of Drive will still air on YouTube, though likely without the large budget granted by NBC. We’re looking forward to another great auto-based show coming on TV and we hope NBC extends the 10-episode contract to a more continual basis. If the trio host a show that as good as their YouTube routines, it’s hard to imagine the TV show not being a hit.

Some people may think of the McLaren 650S as the blood child of the 12C and the P1 in terms of its design, but there’s more to the British automaker’s newest baby than meets the (P1’s) eye. This video of the 650S arriving in Monza for some test runs is all the proof you need to conclude that the this supercar has an identity that’s all its own. From those throaty engine starts that sound like a lion’s roar, all the way to those high-speed accelerations and fly-bys, there’s something totally demonic about the 650S.

It’s not the kind that will make children cower in fear, although hearing the supercar roar could do it anyway.

On the contrary, it’s the kind of evil that’ll make grown men pause and wonder what possessed McLaren to build such a machine that’s capable of not only extraordinary power and speed, but actually looks good doing it.

Still not a believer? Turn up the volume and click play. It may seem rather repetitious, but after the first few cranks and starts, you learn to love hearing it over and over again.

With the McLaren 650S already in production in both Coupe and Spider guises, it was only a matter of time until McLaren Special Operations (MSO) would come up with its unique upgrades for the British sports car .

Only a design study for now, the MSO 650S Coupe Concept blends aligns to the current trend that sees sports car manufacturers blending race-like body parts with special paint options, but offers no powertrain enhancements, leaving them to the track-focused model the Brits are working on.

With plenty of carbon-fiber parts inside and out and rolling on a set of lightweight wheels, the MSO comes in an attractive and unique package that’s likely to preview an upcoming limited edition vehicle. For now, though, the MSO 650S has embarked on a tour across China hoping to draw enough attention to make production worth while.

Even though the fancy body coating and most of the upgrades can’t be had right now, MSO is already offering a couple of updates for current 650S owners. But until a more extensive bundle becomes available, let’s see what the MSO concept has to offer and what sets it apart from the standard 650S.

Click past the jump to read more about the McLaren MSO 650S Coupe Concept.

Last time the McLaren 650S made it into our news we saw a Spider version hitting 205.6 miles per hour at the Hockenheim track. The video was more interesting that regular sports car hooning footage because the 650S managed to overcome its official 204-mph top speed.

We are now back with more McLaren 650S track goodness, but this time it has nothing to do with pushing the speedometer to the limit. The British sports car has now fallen into the hands of Chris Harris, who took it to the Ascari Racing Resort in Spain for a few unconventional laps. We say that because Harris never intended to set a new course record, but approached every corner the Ken Block way. Drifting that is.

Unlike most similar videos, this one is filmed with a camera mounted inside the cockpit, so you won’t be able to actually see the McLaren as it goes sideways through the curves. Don’t be disappointed though, seeing Harris work on that steering wheels is equally entertaining.

As a brief refresh, the McLaren 650S is powered by a turbocharged, 3.8-liter, V-8 engine that sends 650 horsepower and 500 pound-feet of torque to the wheels via a seven-speed dual-clutch box. The sports car needs only 2.9 seconds to sprint from naught to 60 mph and 10.5 to complete a quarter-mile run. The coupe’s top speed sits at 207 mph, while the Spider is officially rated at 204 mph.

When you’re driving a McLaren 650S there’s no such thing as too much track action. Be it the Nurburgring, Silverstone or Laguna Seca, McLaren ’s new sports car is in its natural environment.

Being brand-new, the 650S didn’t get too much track action up until now, save for the enduring testing session it was subjected to during development. But that will soon change as customers will start receiving their cars and, hopefully, they won’t be keeping them in air-conditioned garages.

Deliveries are still a few months off, but we’re happy to report that the folks over at Sport Auto got their hands on a McLaren 650S Spider and took it straight to the Hockenheim track, the other famous German racing course.

Their track test obviously included a full lap on the Formula One circuit, but they also did a top-speed trial. And this is where thing got more than interesting, as the 650S Spider managed to overcome its official top speed, which is rated at 204 mph.

Pushed to the very limit in its seventh gear and at about 7,500 rpm, the sports car reached 331 km/h, which is about 205.6 miles per hour. Sure, the gap is rather tiny, but it’s still something worth knowing and, more importantly, watching.


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