1992 - 2006 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History

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The Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution (colloquially known as the "Evo") is the Japanese brand’s flagship sports car. Based only on the unibody of the domesticated Lancer sedan the Evo is a rally inspired, turbocharged, all wheel drive, durable and finely tuned automobile. The number designation of the model is most commonly a roman numeral, and is about to turn into an “X”

Evolution models prior to version V were the officially approved models for Mitsubishi’s efforts in the World Rally Championship’s Group A class and SCCA Pro Rally Championship. In order to follow these rules, the Evolution is based on the same platform as the Lancer, but is much more powerful and the only major part in common between the Evo and the Lancer is the unibody. Nine street versions of the Evolution have been produced from 1993 up to today. Evolution versions VI, VII, VIII and IX did not need to meet WRC homologation requirements.

 

The Evo was originally intended only for Japanese markets but demand on the ’grey import’ market led the Evolution series to be offered through limited type-approval in the United Kingdom and in various European markets from around 1998 (Evo V-VI). Mitsubishi decided to export the eighth generation Evolution to the United States in 2003 after witnessing the success Subaru had in that market with their Impreza WRX, a direct competitor in other global regions.

 
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History

The current 2006 Evolution (US market) includes a turbocharged 286 hp (213 kW) inline four-cylinder engine and a full-time all wheel drive powertrain. Variable valve timing is an Evolution first in 2006, coming in the form of MIVEC (Mitsubishi Innovative Valve-timing-and-lift Electronic Control). Japanese-spec cars were limited by a gentleman’s agreement to advertise no more than 280 PS (276 hp), a mark already reached by the time of Evo IV; however, each generation of Evo’s power has clandestinely evolved above the advertised number, with the Japan-spec Evo IX having real output of about 320 PS, and various versions available in other markets, particularly the UK, have official power outputs up to 405 bhp (302 kW). Even standard components are considered "tuned" compared to other vehicles. For instance, the flywheel on normal cars weighs about 12-15 kilograms but the Lancer flywheel weighs a mere 6 kilos for very quick engine response. Unfortunately, the Evo has also been evolving into a heavier and heavier vehicle with each generation in face of tougher worldwide safety and emission regulations.

 

The Lancer Evolution was unique among its competitors in the World Rally Championship in that it is a homologated Group A car slightly modified to be able to race competitively against WRC class cars. They were successful in the WRC Rallies from 1996-1999, thanks to the Finn Tommi Makinen, for clinching the driver’s titles from 1996-1999, and the help of teammate Richard Burns for clinching the manufacturer’s championship for the first time in 1998. The Evolution however has now been replaced by the Lancer/Carisma GT and the new Lancer WRC04, but the Evo still competes in the Group A and Group N classes.

 

1992 Evolution I

 

Flush with success from its Galant VR-4 and hungry for WRC victory, Mitsubishi determined in 1990 that further success would require a new platform. To that end, Mitsubishi engineers started with VR-4’s proven drivetrain and shoehorned it into the lighter, smaller Lancer chassis and the Evolution I was born.

 

However, competition in WRC’s Group A required the homologation of 2,500 production models. No problem. Offered in GSR and RS flavors, 5,000 EVO Is were snapped up between September 1992 and December 1993. Mitsubishi’s intent behind the lightweight RS model was to provide a good starting point for building a club-level rally car.

 

The Evolution I was introduced in 1992 to compete in the World Rally Championship. It used the 2.0 L turbocharged DOHC engine and 4WD drivetrain from the original Galant VR-4 in a Lancer chassis, and was sold in GSR and RS models. The latter was a stripped-down club racing version that lacked power windows and seats, anti-lock brakes, a rear wiper, and had steel wheels to save approximately 155 lb (70 kg) less than the 2730 lb (1238 kg) GSR, while the former came with all of the conveniences of a typical street car. It came with Mitsubishi’s 4G63 engine producing 247 PS (244 hp/182 kW) at 6000 rpm and 228 ft·lbf (309 N·m) at 3000 rpm, along with all wheel drive which would become a trademark on all Evo models. 5,000 Evo Is were sold between 1992 and 1993. Evo I was using the CD9A frame.

 
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History
Engine All Aluminum, 4G63 Inline-4

Position Front Transverse

Valvetrain DOHC, 4 Valves per Cyl

Displacement 1997 cc / 121.9 cu in

Bore 3.35 in
Stroke 3.46 in
Compression 8.8:1

Power 186.4 kw / 250 bhp

Hp per litre 125.19 bhp per litre

Bhp/weight 201.61 bhp per weight

Torque 228 ft lbs @ 3000 rpm

Drive wheels Front Engine / 4WD

Front tire size 195/55R15
Rear tire size 195/55R15

Weight 2734 lbs

Wheelbase 98.4 in

Front track 57.1 in

Rear track 57.1 in

Length 169.7 in
Width 66.7 in
Height 54.9 in
Production 5000
 

1993 Evolution II

 

The successful Evo I was changed in December of 1993, and the Lancer Evolution II, built from that month to January 1995, was focused primarily on improving the handling of the EVO I. Though the same fundamental chassis was used in Evolutions I-III, EVO II brought a 10 mm increase in wheelbase accomplished by moving the front wheels forward. Vehicle track was increased at both ends to accommodate larger tires (now 205/60-15; up from 195/55-15), while longer control arms in front and a revised sway-bar mounting arrangement enhanced steering response. Aerodynamic tweaks like a front air dam and an additional rear spoiler support improved vehicle stability at higher speeds.

 

Mitsubishi intended to improve power output with each Evolution, and EVO II started the trend. Boost pressure was increased, higher-lift cams were fitted, and detail changes to the exhaust reduced backpressure. Power of the 4G63 was now up to 256 bhp, while torque remained unchanged at 228 lb-ft, propelling a vehicle weight of 2,750 pounds for GSR models and 2,600 pounds for RS models.

 

Also, Mitsubishi decided to change the frame this year to CE9A, a spin off the CD9A used in the previous edition.

 
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History
Engine 4G63 Inline-4

Position Front Transverse

Aspiration Turbocharged

Valvetrain DOHC, 4 Valves per Cyl

Displacement 121.9 cu in

Bore 3.35 in
Stroke 3.46 in
Compression 8.5:1

Power 193.9 kw / 256 bhp @ Not Available rpm

Hp per litre 130.2 bhp per litre

Bhp/weight 208.0 bhp per weight

Torque  228 ft lbs @ 3000 rpm
Redline 7000
Drive wheels 4WD
Front tire size 205/55R16
Rear tire size 205/55R16

Weight 2756 lbs

Wheelbase 98.8 in

Front track 57.7 in

Rear track 57.9 in

Length 169.7 in
Width 66.7 in
Height 54.9 in

Production 5000 (GSR and RS Models)

 

1995 Evolution III

 

Speeds on tarmac stages were getting higher, so reducing lift and improving cooling performance became priorities in Evolution III. A larger rear wing, a front airdam with brake cooling vents, and rocker panel extensions were fitted and, you guessed it, power was up again. It arrived in January 1995 and this time the 5000 strong production run was brought up more quickly than the Evo 2. The Evo 3 looked more serious, with it’s new nose moulding (to channel air better to the radiator, intercooler, and brakes). New side skirts and rear corners, while the rear wing had grown again to reduce lift. Under the vented aluminium bonnet a new TDO5-16G6-7 Turbo, new exhaust system and increased compression brought another 10 bhp power rise, Torque output was unaltered, apart from a higher final drive ratio. Both GSR and RS still used the same 5speed gearbox. Interior tweaks were limited to a new Momo steering wheel (GSR only) and new fabric on the Evo 2 type Recaros. This model still uses the same frame. (CE9A)

Selling 7,000 examples from January 1995 to August 1996, Evolution III was the best-selling EVO to that date.

 
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History
Engine 4G63 Inline-4

Position Front Transverse

Aspiration Turbocharged

Valvetrain DOHC 4 Valves / Cyl

Fuel feed ECI Multiport Injection

Displacement 121.9 cu in

Bore 3.35 in
Stroke 3.46 in

Power 201.3 kw / 270 bhp @ 6000 rpm

Bhp per litre 135.2 bhp per litre

Bhp/weight 214.29 bhp per weight

Torque  228 ft lbs @ 3000 rpm
Drive wheels 4WD
Front tire size 205/55R16
Rear tire size 205/55R16

F suspension MacPheron Struts, Coil Springs

R suspension Multi-Link Struts, Coil Springs

Weight 2778 lbs

Wheelbase 98.8 in

Front track 57.9 in

Rear track 57.9 in

Length 169.7 in
Width 66.7 in
Height 54.9 in
Production 7000
 

1996 Evolution IV

 

The Lancer platform was completely changed in 1996, and along with it the Evo, which had become extremely popular throughout the world. The engine and transaxle was rotated 180° to better balance the weight and eliminate torque steer. There were 2 versions available, The RS and GSR. The RS version was produced as a competition car with a limited-slip front differential and a friction type LSD at the rear. It also came with GLX seats and 16" steel wheels as these were items that would be replaced by anyone entering the car into competition events. The RS also had wind up windows, no air conditioning-just heater, and a few extra brace bars to strengthen the chassis, one behind the front grill and the other across the boot floor. The RS also had factory thinner body panels and thinner glass! The GSR and the RS shared a new twin scroll turbocharger which helped to increase power to 280 PS (276 hp/206 kW) at 6500 rpm and 260 ft·lbf (352 Nm) of torque at 3000 rpm. Mitsubishi’s new Active YAW control appeared as a factory option on the GSR model, which used steering, throttle input sensors and G sensors to computer-hydraulically controlled torque split individually to the rear wheels and as a result the 10,000 Evo IVs produced all sold quickly. The Evo IV can be distinguished by its two large foglights on the front bumper, and the newly designed tail lights on the rear, which became a standard design to Evo VI, which would become yet another trademark of the Evolution series. This new generation was slightly heavier than previous Evos - the GSR in particular due to the added technology systems- but to counter this the car produced even more power - the Weight of the RS being 2750 lbs and the GSR being 2976 lbs. This was the only model year to use the CN9A as its frame.

 
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History

Engine  4G63 Inline 4

Position  Front Transverse
Aspiration  Turbocharger

Valvetrain DOHC 4-Valves / Cyl

Fuel feed Electronic Fuel Injection

Displacement 121.9 cu in

Bore 3.35 in
Stroke 3.46 in
Compression 8.8:1

Power 208.8 kw / 276.0 bhp @ 6500 rpm

Hp per litre 140.21 bhp per litre

Bhp/weight 207.41 bhp per weight

Torque  261 ft lbs @ 3000 rpm
Drive wheels 4WD

Front brakes Vented Discs 4-Pot Calipers, ABS

Rear brakes Vented Discs Twin-Pot Calipers, ABS

Front tire size 205/55R16
Rear tire size 205/55R16

Steering Rack & Pinion Power Assist

F suspension MacPherson Struts Coil Springs

R suspension Multi-Link Coil Springs

Weight 2976 lbs

Wheelbase 98.8 in

Front track 57.9 in

Rear track 57.9 in

Length 170.5 in
Width 66.5 in
Height 55.7 in

Transmission 5-Speed Manual

Gear ratios 2.785:1, 1.950:1, 1.407:1, 1.031:1, 0.761:1

Final drive 4.529:1

Top speed 180.2 kph / 112.0 mph

0 - 60 mph 5.5 seconds

Production 12000
 

1997 Evolution V

 

In 1997, the WRC created a new class, "World Rally Car", and while these cars still had to abide by Group A standards, they did not have to meet homologation rules. Mitsubishi redesigned the Evo IV with this in mind and introduced the Evo V in January of 1998.

 

Many aspects of the car were changed such as: The interior was upgraded in the GSR version with a better class of Recaro seat. The body kit had flared arches at the front and rear and a new aluminium rear spoiler relaced the IV FRP version and gave an adjustable angle of attack to alter rear down force. The track was widened by 10 mm, the wheel offset changed from ET45 to ET38 along with the wheel diameter which rose from 16" to 17" to accommodate Brembo brakes which were added to enhance braking. In addition the brake master cylinder bore increased by 0.3 mm. The engine was strengthened in a few areas and the cam duration was increased. The pistons were lighter with a smaller skirt area. 510CC injectors were replaced with 560CC injectors for better engine reliability due to more electrical "headroom" and the ECU was changed to include a flash ROM.

 

Further more, the turbocharger was again improved. Torque was increased to 275 ft·lbf (373 N·m) at 3000 rpm. Power officially stayed the same, at 280 PS (276 hp/206 kW) as agreed by Japan’s automotive gentlemen’s agreement that all cars would have 276 or less hp, but reputable sources claim horsepower was actually somewhat higher. Frame CP9A was used on the Evo V.

 

Despite the changes, total weight increased only 22 pounds over the EVO IV. With an aggressive new rear wing, larger hood vents for improving radiator airflow, a deeper front chin spoiler, and enormous cooling vents in the bumper, the EVO V looked like a rolling street fight.

 
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History
Engine Turbocharged Inline-4

Position Front Transverse

Aspiration Turbocharged

Valvetrain DOHC 4 Valves / Cyl

Fuel feed ECI Electronic Multi-Injection

Displacement 121.9 cu in
Bore 3.35 in
Stroke 3.46 in
Compression 8.8:1

Power 208.8 kw / 280 bhp @ Not Available rpm

Hp per litre 140.21 bhp per litre

Bhp/weight 205.88 bhp per weight

Torque  275 ft lbs @ 3000 rpm

Drive wheels Front Engine / 4WD

Body / frame Unit Steel

Front brakes Brembro Vented Discs 4-Pot Calipers

Rear brakes Brembro Vented Discs Twin-Pot Calipers

Front tire size 225/45ZR17
Rear tire size 225/45ZR17

Steering Rack & Pinion Power Assist

F suspension Mac Pherson Struts

R suspension Multi-Link

Weight 2998 lbs

Wheelbase 98.8 in

Front track 59.4 in

Rear track 59.3 in

Length 171.3 in

Width 1770 mm / 69.7 in

Height 1415 mm / 55.7 in

Transmission 5-Speed Manual

Gear ratios 2.785:1, 1.950:1, 1.407:1, 1.031:1, 0.761:1

Production 6000
 

1999 Evolution VI

 

The Evo VI’s changes mainly focused on cooling and engine durability. It received a larger intercooler, larger oil cooler, and new pistons, along with a titanium-aluminide turbine wheel for the RS model, which was a first in a production car. Also, the Evo VI received new bodywork yet again, with the most easily spotted change in the front bumper where the huge foglights were reduced in size and moved to the corners for better airflow. A new model was added to the GSR and RS lineup; known as the RS2, it was an RS with a few of the GSR’s options. Another limited-edition RS was known as the RS Sprint, and was tuned by Ralliart to be lighter and more powerful with 330 hp.

 

Yet another special edition Evo VI was also released in 1999: the Tommi Makinen edition, named after Finnish rally driver Tommi Makinen that had won Mitsubishi numerous WRC drivers championships. It featured Red/Black Recaro seats (with emmbosed T. Makinen logo), 17" ENKEI white wheels, a leather MOMO steering wheel and shift knob, a titanium turbine that spooled up quicker, front upper strut brace, lowered with tarmac stages in mind, a quicker lock to lock and amongst others colours, came in an exclusive shade of red with special decals, replicating Tommi Makinen’s rally car’s colour scheme. This car is also sometimes referred to as an Evo 6¹/² .

 

It was during the Evo VI’s model run that American car enthusiasts, who had been previously denied the Evolution models, began to ask for its introduction to the United States. This was primarily due to exposure of the Evolution in movies, anime like Initial D, and video games such as the Gran Turismo series.

Another trim level was introduced, RS2, combining the RS-only hardware specification with a modicum of the GSR’s niceties.

The frame used for the EVO VI was CP9A on both the TME and standard edtions.

 
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History
Engine All Aluminum, 4G63 Inline-4

Position Front Transverse

Aspiration Twin Scroll Turbo Intercooler

Valvetrain DOHC, 4 Valves per Cyl

Displacement 121.9 cu in

Bore 3.35 in
Stroke 3.46 in
Compression 8.8:1

Power 208.8 kw / 280.0 bhp @ 6500 rpm

Hp per litre 140.21 bhp per litre

Bhp/weight 205.88 bhp per weight

Redline 7000

Drive wheels Transverse Front Engine / 4WD

Body / frame Unit Steel

Front brakes Brembro Vented Discs 4-Pot Calipers, ABS

F brake size 12.6 in

Rear brakes Brembro Vented Discs 2-Pot Calipers, ABS

R brake size 12.0 in

Front wheels 17.0 x 7.5 in

Rear wheels 17.0 x 7.5 in

Front tire size 225/45ZR17
Rear tire size 225/45ZR17

Steering Rack & Pinion Power Assist

F suspension MacPherson Struts Lower Wishbones, Coil Springs, Dampers, Anti-Roll Bar

R suspension Multi-Link Lower Wishbones, Coil Springs, Dampers, Anti-Roll Bar

Weight 2998 lbs

Wheelbase 98.8 in

Front track 59.4 in

Rear track 59.3 in

Length 171.3 in
Width 73.8 in
Height 55.9 in

Transmission 5-Speed Manual

Gear ratios 2.785:1, 1.950:1, 1.407:1, 1.031:1, 0.761:1

Final drive 4.529:1

Top speed 150.0 mph

0 - 60 mph 5.0 seconds

0 - 100 mph 12.0 seconds

Drag 0.36 Cd
Production 5000
 

2001 Evolution VII

 

In 2001, Mitsubishi decided to race in the WRC class instead of the Group A class, and thus did not need to follow homologation rules. The Evo VII was based on the larger Lancer Cedia platform and as a result gained more weight over the Evo VI, but made up for this with multiple important chassis tweaks. The biggest change was the addition of an active center differential and a more effective limited-slip differential, while a front helical limited-slip differential was added. Torque was increased again to 284 ft·lbf (385 N·m) with engine tweaks that allowed greater airflow, and horsepower officially remained at 280 PS (276 hp/206 kW). Despite its civilian appearance, the Evolution VII can outrun many more expensive cars (such as the Ferrari 360 Modena).

Most significant was the introduction of an active center differential (ACD), an all-new electro-hydraulically controlled multiplate clutch-type limited-slip differential with three times the binding capacity (783 lb-ft compared to 221 lb-ft) of the viscous unit used in the EVO VI. Active Yaw Control (AYC) still regulated torque split in the rear differential, while a torque-sensing helical limited-slip was fitted to the front. With input from a host of sensors, ACD and AYC were both regulated by a single dedicated control unit. Together, ACD and AYC improved turn-in and reduced understeer more seamlessly, allowing controlled tail-out hooliganism and scalpel-sharp steering response.

 

Structural reinforcements to the donor Cedia chassis increased flexural rigidity by 50 percent by adding thicker sheetmetal and bracing in high-load regions, seam-welding in the B-pillars and front chassis section, and more than 200 additional spot welds in the door apertures. Weight-saving measures like thinner glass, forged aluminum suspension pieces, aluminum front fenders, thinner sheetmetal in the roof panel, a magnesium cam cover, and hollow camshafts kept the total vehicle weight increase to about 90 pounds over the EVO VI.

 

At 276 hp, quoted power remained unchanged though peak torque increased to 283 lb-ft, this time by way of reworked intake ports, a less-restrictive intake manifold, and a smaller twin-scroll turbine housing (reduced from 10.5 to 9.8 cm2). Paired with a 20mm larger intercooler and a lower-backpressure exhaust, the sauce was spread over a broader range of engine speeds than ever before. Overall, the VII was an even more potent performer-if a more civilized one-than the VI.

 

The frame used was frame:CT9A, which is the currently used frame on all Evolutions manufactured currently.

 
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History
Engine 4G63 Turbocharged Inline-4

Aspiration Front Transverse

Valvetrain DOHC 4 Valves / Cyl

Displacement 121.9 cu in

Bore 3.35 in
Stroke 3.46 in
Compression 8.8:1

Power 280.0 bhp @ 6500 rpm

Hp per litre 140.21 bhp per litre

Bhp/weight 

Torque 282.5 ft lbs @ 3500 rpm

Drive wheels Front Engine / 4WD

Front brakes Brembro Vented Discs 4 Pot Calipers, ABS & EBD

F brake size 12.6 in

Rear brakes Brembro Vented Discs 2 Pot Calipers, ABS & EBD

R brake size 11.8 in

Front wheels 17.0 x 8.0 in

Rear wheels 17.0 x 8.0 in

Front tire size 235/45R17
Rear tire size 235/45R17

Steering Rack & Pinion Power Assist

Weight 3086 lbs

Wheelbase 103.3 in

Front track 59.6 in

Rear track 59.6 in

Length 175.4 in
Width 69.7 in
Height 57.1 in

Transmission W5M51 5-Speed Manual

Gear ratios 2.928:1, 1.950:1, 1.407:1, 1.031:1, 0.720:1

Final drive 4.529:1

Top speed 111.8 mph

 

2003 Evolution VIII

 

The Evolution was changed again in 2003, this time sporting Super Active Yaw Control to handle traction and a 6-speed manual gearbox. It was available with 280 PS (276 hp/206 kW) in three trims: standard (GSR in Japan), RS (devoid of all excess components, such as the rear wing, trunk carpeting, interior map lights, power windows/doors, and radio) and MR, which came with a new vortex generator (a set of ridges above the rear window to improve aerodynamics). Both RS and MR Editions came with a revised limited-slip front differential.

 

The Lancer Evolution VIII MR uses slick-response Bilstein shocks for improved handling. The aluminum roof panel and other reductions in body weight have lowered the centre of gravity to realize more natural roll characteristics. Detail improvements have also been made to Mitsubishi’s own electronic all-wheel drive, to the ACD 5 + Super AYC 6 traction control and to the Sports ABS systems. The Lancer Evolution VIII displayed at the 2003 Tokyo Motor Show took the MR designation traditionally reserved for Mitsubishi Motors high-performance models and used first on the Galant GTO. Other parts on the MR include BBS alloy wheels, Recaro bucket seats, Brembo brakes, and a MOMO steering wheel

 

In the United Kingdom, many special Evolutions were introduced, which included FQ320, FQ340, and FQ400 variants (FQ said jocularly to stand for ’Fucking Quick’). They each came with 320, 340, and 400 hp (239, 254, and 298 kW), respectively.

 

The FQ400, sold through Ralliart UK, produces 302.13 kW (405.2 hp), from its 2.0 L 4G63 engine as the result of being specially modified by United Kingdom tuning firms Ram Ram page, Owen Devel Devel opments and Flow Race Engines. At 202.9 hp (151.3 kW) per litre, it has one of the highest specific output per litre of any roadcar engine. With a curb weight of around 3200 lb, it achieves a 0-60 in 3.5 seconds and a 0-100 in around 9 seconds, while costing about £47,000. BBC’s television series Top Gear demonstrated that the FQ-400 could easily keep up with a Lamborghini Murcielago around a test track. The Stig recorded a Top Gear Power Lap Times of 1 minute 24.8 seconds.

 

The Lancer Evolution VIII was also the first Evolution to come to the United States, spurred by the success of the Subaru Subaru Impreza WRX which had been released there just three years prior. However, the internal components for the American versions were based largely on the specifications for the Japanese Lancer Evolution VII. No US-spec Evolution has active yaw control, including the 2006 Evolution IX. The American 2003 and 2004 GSRs are without the helical limited-slip front differential and 6-speed manual transmission. The 2004 US spec RS model, however, does have a front helical limited-slip differential. All 2003, 2004 and 2005 RS and GSR models have the Japanese Evolution VII’s 5-speed transmission. The MR edition was introduced to the US in 2004, the first model to sport the ACD and still (as of 2006) the only model with a 6-speed transmission. The 2005 US spec RS and GSR have the ACD standard, and the front helical limited-slip differential is now standard on all models. The timing and tuning are also slightly lower than its Japanese counterpart, allowing it to adhere to the strict emissions regulations of the United States.

 

Most Evolution VIIIs have a carbon fiber rear spoiler with matching body-color endplates, except for the MR Edition, whose endplates are painted black. The basic RS Edition does not come with a rear spoiler.

Frame: CT9A
 
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History
Engine Turbocharged 4G63 Inline-4

Position Front, Transverse

Aspiration Turbocharged

Valvetrain DOHC, 4 Valves per Cyl

Fuel feed ECI-MULTI Electronic Fuel Injection

Displacement 121.9 cu in

Bore 3.35 in
Stroke 3.46 in
Compression 8.8:1

Power 271.0 bhp @ 6500 rpm

Hp per litre 135.7 bhp per litre

Bhp/weight 184.35 bhp per weight

Torque  273 ft lbs @ 3500 rpm
Redline 7000

Drive wheels Full Time 4WD Front and Rear LSDs

Body / frame Unit Steel

Front brakes Vented Discs ABS

F brake size 14 in

Rear brakes Vented Discs ABS

R brake size 12 in

Front wheels 17 x 8 in

Rear wheels 17 x 8 in

Front tire size P235/45ZR17 Yokohama A-046

Rear tire size P235/45ZR17 Yokohama A-046

Steering Rack & Pinion Power Assist

F suspension MacPherson, Struts Lower Control Arms, Shock Absorbers, Coil Springs, Anti-Roll Bar

R suspension Multi-Link, Lower Control Arms, Shock Absorbers, Coil Springs, Anti-Roll Bar

Weight 3241 lbs

Wheelbase 103.3 in

Front track 59.6 in

Rear track 59.6 in

Length 214.0 in
Width 69.7 in
Height 57.1 in

Transmission 5-Speed Manual

Gear ratios 2.928:1, 1.950:1, 1.407:1, 1.031:1, 0.720:1

Final drive 4.529:1

Top speed 155.0 mph

0 - 60 mph 5.0 seconds

0 - 100 mph 13.0 seconds

0 - 1/4 mile 13.3 seconds

Epa city/hwy 21 mpg
 

2006 Evolution IX

Mitsubishi introduced the 2006 Lancer Evolution IX at the 2005 New York International Auto Show. The 2.0 L 4G63 engine got MIVEC technology (variable valve timing), boosting official power output to 286 hp (213 kW) and torque to 289 ft·lbf (392 N·m) - however actual figures are significantly higher. The Evolution VIII first offered in 2003 would produce dynamometer readings of approximately 225 WHP and 225 ft-lbs. WTQ with a flywheel power rating of 271/273 respectively. The Evolution IX typically pulls 255 WHP and 250 WTQ on a dynamometer, a difference of 30 horsepower, not even taking into consideration the drivetrain losses.

 

The Lancer Evolution IX models (RS,IX,MR) vary in their performance capabilities. Subtleties unique to each model account for variations in acceleration, handling and top speed. The decontented RS is the purist’s car, reaching 60 mph in a mere 4.4 seconds, compared to 4.5 for the slightly heavier IX and MR models (which have power windows, rear spoilers, and Xenon lights). Weight savings of over 60 pounds give the RS a subtly sharper handling responsiveness that helps it shave fractions of a second off the lap times of the IX and MR on an identical course. The premium price of the top-model MR is not spent in vain if speed is a priority, as the MR’s 6th forward gear allows it to reach 165 mph at 7,000 rpm compared to 157 at 7,000 in 5th for the RS and middle-positioned IX models. (Note: Data relevant to U.S. model specifications)

 

The IX keeps all the Evolution VIII MR goodies like Bilstein shocks, a 6-speed manual transmission, vortex generators, BBS alloy wheels, Recaro bucket seats, Brembo brakes, MOMO steering wheel, and an aluminium roof. Additional revisions from 2005 include a closer gear ratio for the 5-speed transmission, new lighter Enkei wheels on non-MR models, a redesigned front end, a more efficient air dam (the most noticeable feature are the two small oval ducts to cool the intercooler pipes) and new rear bumper with a diffuser undersurface to smooth out the airflow coming out of the car.

 

All three models are available in the US. All models use the same 286 hp (213 kW) engine. All models use a front and rear LSD (Limited Slip Differential), and an ACD (Active Center Differential).

 

 * Standard/GSR - revised 5-speed, standard model

 * RS - revised 5-speed, aluminium roof, gauge pack, minimal interior

 * MR - 6-speed, Bilstein monotube shocks, aluminium roof, gauge pack

 

Three models are also available in Europe and Japan. Although all models use the same 286 hp (213 kW) engine, the torque differs from one model to another. The GSR produces 295 ft·lbf (400 Nm) of torque while the RS and GT produce 300 ft·lbf (407 Nm).

 

 * RS - revised 5-speed, aluminium roof, gauge pack, minimal interior, LSD and a titanium-magnesium turbine

 * GT - revised 5-speed, this is basically the RS mechanically, but with some of the GSR’s features (mainly interior pieces).

 * GSR - 6-speed, Bilstein monotube shocks, aluminium roof, gauge pack, AYC (Active Yaw Control), and double-din radio (this is roughly equivalent to the MR)

 

A 2,500-piece, limited edition Evolution IX station wagon was released in Japan soon after the sedan’s debut. It uses the back end of the Lancer Sportback wagon grafted onto the sedan. Two trim models will be introduced: the GT with a six-speed manual transmission and the GT-A with a 5-speed automatic. Other than the station wagon back end, redesigned seats, and some small chromed trim pieces, the car’s interior is the same as the sedan. There is some debate over whether or not the wagon will be introduced to the United States and other markets.

 

Mitsubishi also developed the Evolution MIEV, based on the Evolutions IX’s chassis but with 4 electric engines connected to the four wheels as a test bed for the Mitsubishi In-wheel Electric Vehicle (MIEV) next-generation electric vehicle. The in-wheel engines use a hollow doughnut construction to locate the rotor outside the stator unlike other electric motors where the rotor turns inside the stator. The result of this is a lighter engine which translates into lower unsprung weight in a system where the engines are mounted in the wheels. Each in-wheel engine produces a power output of 68hp, thus giving a massive combined output of 272 hp comparable to that of regular, gas powered Lancer Evolutions. The car subsequently competed in the Shikoku EV (Electric Vehicle) Rally 2005.

Evo IX uses the CT9A frame.
 
Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History
Engine Cast Iron Inline-4

Position Front, Transverse

Aspiration Twin Scroll Turbocharger Intercooler

Valvetrain DOHC, 4 Valves per Cyl MIVEC VVT

Fuel feed Electronic Fuel Injection

Displacement 121.9 cu in

Bore 3.35 in
Stroke 3.46 in
Compression 8.8:1

Power 213.3 kw / 286 bhp @ 6500 rpm

Hp per litre 143.21 bhp per litre

Bhp/weight 191.95 bhp per weight

Torque  289 ft lbs @ 3500 rpm
Redline 7000

Drive wheels Full Time 4WD active Center Differential, Front Limited Slip, Rear Mechincal Limited Slip

Body / frame Unit Steel

Front brakes Brembro Discs 4-Piston Calipers, ABS, EBD

F brake size 12.6 in

Rear brakes Brembro Discs Twin-Piston Calipers, ABS, EBD

r brake size 12 in

Front wheels 17 x 8 in

Rear wheels 17 x 8 in

Front tire size P235/45R17
Rear tire size P235/45R17

Steering Rack & Pinion Power Assist

F suspension MacPherson Struts, Bilstein Shock Absorbers, Trailing Links, Lateral Links, Stabilizer Bar

R suspension Mulit-Link, Bilstein Shock Absorbers, Trailing Links, Lateral Links, Stabilizer Bar

Weight 3285 lbs

Wheelbase 103.3 in

Front track 59.6 in

Rear track 59.6 in

Length 178.5 in
Width 69.7 in
Height 57.1 in

Transmission 6-Speed Manual

Gear ratios 2.909:1, 1.944:1, 1.434:1, 1.100:1, 0.868:1, 0.693:1

Final drive 4.538:1

Top speed 249.4 kph / 155 mph

0 - 60 mph 4.7 seconds

0 - 100 mph 12.7 seconds

0 - 1/4 mile 13.5 seconds

Epa city/hwy 19 mpg
 
 

As Mitsubishi’s product manager for the Lancer line, Hideyuki Iwata, insists there will be an Evo X, even though Mitsubishi Motors has lost almost $9 billion over the past five years and was hemorrhaging at the rate of $12.5 million per day back in February, according to Automotive News. Mitsubishi sold a piddling 12,500 Evos worldwide last year (4497 of them in the U.S.), but it’s a profitable business, says Hideyuki Iwata. Besides, he adds, Mitsubishi dealers routinely accept a Porsche or Mercedes in trade for an Evo. That’s a brand polisher for a company chin-deep in tarnish.

 

As the name subtly indicates the Mitsubishi Concept-X is the preview for the new Lancer to come, in it’s most potent version, the Evolution X. With styling that raises the bar on performance car looks it will boast Mitsubishi’s 4WD-based Super All Wheel Control (S-AWC1) vehicle dynamics control system, the very embodiment of "driving pleasure". The Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution X is expected to be released in 2007.

Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution History

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11 comments:

Lovely Evo history review, it became famous because of Tommy Makinen, and the problem with the STI is it’s weight. evo is light plus its handling are incredible.

Well said, EvoFan12. Put this thing on a mountain racetrack and it will outrun any Ferrari or Lamborghini,(something it has already done).

The only problem with the crap you just said is... well everything you just said. Watch top gear, they do a drag between an Evo and an STI. Evo wins, STI loses miserably. And around a track the Evo beats it even worse. And yes it was the 2004 STI which has the most HP and torque of any model, and no it wasn’t even the Evo MR. So don’t go off of the numbers. Not sure what fantasy world you’re living in but the Evo is basically the most amazing car ever built and i agree completely with the ferrari comment. It takes a true car fan to love the Evo. Personally i’d take an Evo over a ferrari any day. Especially the FQ400 smiley

The only problem with this crap is that the STI would always be better and faster.

Any idiot can see beauty in a Ferrari or Lamborghini, a high price tag makes anything beautiful. Only a true car fan can see the beauty of a car like this which(as mentioned above) are quite capable of smoking almost any high price tag cars.

GOOD & NICE

please send me the history of your company
and reviews of ur company and the concept car

diz is a hot looking,car, my sweet lord. i know i’m gettttttttttting one.i really hope mits keep it daz stilo.

diz is a hot looking,car, my sweet lord. i know i’m gettttttttttting one.i really hope mits keep it daz stilo.

this is the most fabulous and attractive car in the world

its vry vry goood

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