Over $10 Millions

Over $10 Millions

Known as the most successful manufacturer ever to race in Formula One , Ferrari is also famous for its glorious sports car racing years. The Italians gathered no less than nine outright Le Mans wins and 13 World Sportscar Championships between the late 1940 and the early 1970s, being surpassed by very few companies in that department. Ferrari’s golden age of endurance racing came to a halt in 1974, when Enzo stopped all development of sports cars prototypes in order to focus on Formula One. Maranello lied dormant for nearly two decades until 1994, when the 333 SP, built at the request of amateur racer Giampiero Moretti, hit the track marking the brand’s return to sports prototype racing.

Designed by famed Italian chassis manufacturer Dallara, the 333 SP was offered to privateers who raced it with great success until 2003. The open-top race car not only managed to give Ferrari a triumphant return to sports car racing, it also became the only Ferrari to win the 24 Hours of Daytona and the 12 Hours of Sebring.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ferrari 333 SP

A 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO has become the most expensive car sold at auction after changing owners for a whopping $38,115,000 at Bonhams’ Quail Lodge Auction in Carmel, California. The classic Prancing Horse surpassed the auction record set by a 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196R Formula One race car that sold for $30 million at the 2013 Goodwood Festival of Speed Auction.

Only 39 of these Ferraris were built in the 1960s, with many of them fetching millions of dollars during either public auctions or private sales. One example that was owned by Stirling Moss changed hands for $35 million in 2012, while another 250 GTO sold for $52 million in 2013. Both were sold privately.

Powered by a 3.0-liter, V-12 engine, the 250 GTO shown above — chassis and engine number 3851GT — was driven to a second-place overall finish in the 1962 Tour de France by Jo Schlesser and Henry Oreiller. More a maintained car than a restored one, the 3851GT has been active all its 54-year-long life, being raced in many classic motorsport events. It’s one of the most often raced 250 GTOs and it has been in a single family ownership for the past 49 years. This pretty much explains the huge price tag, doesn’t it?

The $38-million 250 GTO wasn’t the only Ferrari to fetch big bucks at Bonhams’ sale in California. Ten other Italian sports and race cars crossed the block for a combined total of $65.9 million. The bundle included a 1962 250 GT SWB Speciale that sold for $6.8 million, a 1953 250 Mille Miglia Berlinetta driven by Phil Hill for $7.2 million, and a 1978 312 T3 Formula One car for $2.3 million.

Click past the jump to read about the Ferrari 250 GTO


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