Porsche 911 (997)

Porsche 911 (997)

Sometimes you just need a manual transmission to row. That’s how our friend Chris Harris feels before he hops in two of the last manual-transmission track cars still around, the older 997 Porsche GT3 RS and the famed 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 .

A rain-soaked racetrack nestled in the rolling English countryside provides the playground, and despite the standing water, the two cars stay planted on the tarmac. Sure, Harris has plenty of sideways action, but it seems nothing was unplanned.

The point of this little track test, according to Harris, isn’t to compare the Z/28 and GT3 RS side-by-side, but to just have fun rowing gears in a proper sports car — something our host isn’t used to saying in regards to a Camaro . Nevertheless, the Z/28’s engine with its high-tech internals and 7,000-rpm redline, provides plenty of fun. Its 305-series tires provide enough grip around the wet track to keep the 3,800-pound car from sliding into the wall.

Manual transmission-equipped sports cars are becoming less and less popular, as the performance numbers provided by these new flap-paddle gearboxes outdo those of the manual and as fewer people know how to drive stick. While it’s probable most folks looking to buy a hyped-up sports car know how to do the three-pedal dance, it’s undeniable that dual-clutch automatics are faster around a track.

But that begs the question; is speed everything, or is the connection and experience with the car worth more? Let us know what you think in the comments.

Sabine Schmitz is a name you might recognize; she is a professional driver who is referred to by many as the “Queen of the ‘Ring.” She was one of the first head drivers of the Nurburgring taxi service, and if you have ever watched Top Gear, she is the excitable young German lady that took a Ford Transit van around the Green Hell in Series 6. She also hosts German automotive television show, D Motor. To say she knows cars is quite an understatement, and that is what makes this video so interesting. Sabine owns a 997-generation 911 GT3 that she has driven for more than 12,000 miles on the Nurburgring alone, and she is set to compare it to the all-new 991-generation 911 GT3 . You know, the one that Porsche stopped selling because it caught on fire.

With Sabine’s intimate knowledge of the older GT3, it is really interesting to hear her take on the new car. She has the ability to really pick out the subtle things that make each car feel and perform differently. Now this is only a short performance test and drive time on a closed airfield, not a blast down the Nordschliefe, so Sabine can only say so much about the way the car drives, but she still seems impressed.

Click play to watch Sabine beat on both her personal 911, the new 911 , and as a bonus you get to hear lots of angry Porsche flat-six wail as she drags both cars screaming to their redlines. It a glorious thing, so turn that volume up.

Liveries and sponsors are an important part of motorsport. No wonder certain models are best recognized when wearing the colors of Martini, Gulf Oil or even Coca Cola. Take Porsche for instance; the Germans have scored some of their most important racing wins while wrapped in Martini, Gulf and Rothmans liveries. The 911 , 935 , 936, 956 and the 962 are all related to these brands. But there’s a certain livery that’s often overlooked when it comes to Porsche. The white, red and blue of Brumos Racing , a team established by Peter Gregg in Florida, in 1971.

A race driver himself, Gregg took on the IMSA GT Championship with sponsorship from Brumos Porsche, a dealerships that had been importing rear-engined sports car into America since 1959. Granted, Brumos never reached the heights of the Gulf- and Rothmans-sponsored Porsches, but it did win the 24 Hours of Daytona four times. Its first success dates back to 1973, while the most recent win occurred in 2009. Brumos’ career also includes appearances in the Can-Am series with the incredibly fast 917. Although the company folded in 2013, its white cars adorned by red and blue stripes remained iconic figures among endurance racing aficionados.

To honor Brumos Porsche and its successful track record, the Germans launched a special-edition 911 Carrera GTS in 2012. Dubbed B59, it consisted of only five bespoke units that came in Carrara White with the famous Brumos stripe design. These sports cars also payed tribute to Hurley Haywood, who raced Porsches for around 20 years and played a big part in Brumos’ success. All five were delivered to the United States, where they found homes in collectors’ and Brumos enthusiasts’ garages. Some keep them alongside other Porsches, while others store them in garages that also include British vehicles and pure American muscle cars .

They all share a common passion that has been captured brilliantly in the video above. Hit the play button to meet the owners and the story behind Brumos and Hurley Haywood.

Posted on by Simona  
Porsche 550

We heard the first details on the possibility of a new 550 shortly after Volkswagen unveiled the Volkswagen Bluesport concept . Back then, the 550 was believed to be one of the three production models rumored to be based on the Bluesport: one from Audi , one from Volkswagen would have joined Porsche. Unfortunately, that all ended when VW announced that the Bluesport would bot be produced.

Now, new details suggest that the 550 will instead be built as a new Speedster version of the new-generation 911. Reports suggest that it will be built as a tribute to the classic 550 Spyder built from 1953 to 1957. The new model is rumored to be unveiled sometime in 2015, and will be limited to only 550 units.

According to AutoBild, the new 550 will feature hidden door handles — just like the classic 550 — a chopped-down windshield and a fabric top that will reside under a rear cover made from carbon fiber. This makes it possible for the fabric top to be used only when it is absolutely necessary.

Click past the jump to read more about the previous 911 Speedster model.

Source: AutoBild

The Porsche 997 GT3 may have already been replaced by a slew of newer models, including the current generation 991 GT3 , but sports cars like this are the rare kind that really lasts the test of time.

That’s why a tuning company like Cam Shaft went out of its way to give the sports car quite an aftermarket program. You might notice that this 997 GT3 is wearing a pretty snazzy livery. Look closer and you’ll realize that Cam Shaft, no stranger to fancy dress-ups, gave the German sports car an individually customized Martini Racing design on top of the Pearly White full-scale foil. The Martini Racing livery is the real head-turner here, complete with all the trimmings, lines and even the iconic Mattes logo on the hood and doors.

Availing of this design will cost you &euro2,400 for the Pearl White finish and &euro900 for the Martini livery. It’s not exactly cheap, but ultimately, it should be worth the investment if you have the finances to do so.

But the Martini Racing dress-up isn’t the only thing that makes this program stand out. Cam Shaft also gave the car’s engine a little tweaking of its own, courtesy of its in-house PP performance engine optimization program. With this &euro1,899 modification, Cam Shaft was able to increase the 997 GT3’s output to 435 horsepower, 20 ponies more than the standard output.

It still falls short of the current 475-horsepower output of the current 991 GT3 , but it’s still a nice bump in our opinion.

Click past the jump to read about the Porsche 997 GT3

Posted on by Simona  

At the end of July, Porsche set a new record for the largest parade of 911 models , with 1,208 different 911s lapping Silverstone at once. Now, two weeks later Porsche decided to finally unveil the video of the record parade.

The parade was part of the celebration of the 911 ’s 50th anniversary and was organized by Porsche Club Great Britain. Along with bringing together this amazing number of 911s from all generations, the parade also brought into focus legendary drivers and Mark Porsche, the son of Ferdinand Alexander ’Butzi’ Porsche who designed the original 911.

The parade brought together classic Carreras, 911 RSs, RSRs, 911 GTs, Speedsters, Targas, and 911 Turbo and you can spot them all in this short video. Check out the video and try to see how many models can you recognize and which ones would you like to own. We’ll take them all...

Posted on by David Hurth  

LOMA is best known for its work on the C6 Corvettes , but recently the German company has decided to turn its sights on Porsche. Because of the company’s location, all of the parts in the kit are made in Germany using carbon fiber, which is something a Porsche owner will prefer.

The 911 GT3 RSR is one of the most awesome Porsches ever built, but it’s not built to handle daily driving nor is it priced for the average Porsche buyer. To help satisfy your urge to own one, LOMA decided to make a kit to allow for you to turn your 997 into an RSR.

The 911 retains the stock engine that produces at least 325 horsepower, but LOMA offers a sports exhaust system to give the car more of a racecar soundtrack. The suspension and brakes also stay the same as the stock car, so the car doesn’t ride any lower than stock unless you decide to lower the car yourself.

Hit the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 RS1 by LOMA.

LA-based tuner, Misha, is at it again and this time around, a 997-generation Porsche 911 is its canvas. This all-new body kit, dubbed the GTM2, adds even more sportiness and a little more width to the last-generation 911 . This kit will fit on any wide- or narrow-body 911 between 2005 and 2011, and it is compatible with both versions of the 997.1 and 997.2 taillights.

The kit includes a new front bumper, a revised hood, a set of side skirts and an all-new rear bumper. Additionally, you get to choose from one of three styles of rear wing, including a sporty-looking duck-tail-style wing. If you need to save a little weight, you can opt for the front bumper lip, the rear diffusor and the wing blade to be made from carbon fiber.

The great thing about this kit is that it bolts directly to the 911’s existing mounting points. This eliminates the need for drilling and potentially ruining the value of your beloved sports car . Additionally, you can buy the entire kit for one bulk price or you can break it up piece-by-piece if money’s a little tight.

In talking to Misha, we found that the entire kit runs $6,795 and if you opt for the carbon-fiber upgrade, it jumps to $8,495. To purchase the components separately, you must contact Misha.

Professional photographer Nino Batista knows what people want. More specifically, he knows the pulse of the common warm-blooded man.

So when he as a car like the Porsche 911 GT3 Cup Racer and a model like Alicia Thill at his disposal, you know darn well that a photo spread is about to ensue.

As far as we’re concerned, we can’t decide what we like better: the car or the girl. Both are hot and both are just downright drool-worthy.

Fortunately, Batista knows the art of compromising. So instead of focusing on just one model, he decides to have both in his spread, to the gratitude of men all over the world.

For more details on this photoshoot, hop on over and check out the gallery below. There’s something to be said about a girl and a sports race car that seem to be at home with each other. This spread for Autodynamica featuring Thill and the 911 GT3 Cup Racer is one of those instances.

Source: Nino Batista

With only 500 units built and a total of 620 HP under the hood, the Porsche 911 GT2 RS is a car that many auto enthusiasts dream about. This is evident in the fact that, although it is priced at €237,578 (about $310,000 at the current exchange rates), the GT2 RS sold out almost instantly. Lucky for us, Wimmer Racing Technology grabbed on to one of the units and then updated it "a little bit."

Since the 911 GT2 RS is such an impressive car, Wimmer opted to leave the exterior as is and focused on the engine instead. Two optimized Wimmer turbochargers were added, as was an optimization of the air induction, sports camshafts and crankshaft, timing chains, machined cylinder heads, pistons and connecting rods, a fuel pump unit, two manifolds with bypass, and two 200 cell sport catalysts. As a result, the six-cylinder boxer engine now delivers an amazing 1,020 HP and 817 lb-ft of torque. With the extra 400 HP, the GT2 RS will sprint from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.4 seconds, to 124 mph in 8.7 seconds, and hit a top speed of 180 mph (however, the top speed indicator shows an amazing 241 mph).

In order to handle the extra power, the Porsche 911 GT2 RS has been equipped with a new set of custom-designed 19" wheels in combination with a 3-way adjustable Competition-suspension from KW.


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